N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains - We Are The Mighty
Asperiores odit

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains

The remains have not yet been confirmed by U.S. specialists to be those of American servicemen

Asperiores odit

Saudi Arabia is paying $15 billion for this advanced anti-missile system

The Pentagon says the US State Department has approved the possible sale of the advanced THAAD missile-defense system to Saudi Arabia for $15 billion, citing Iran among threats in the Middle East.


The Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency said in an Oct. 6 statement that it had notified the US Congress about the possible sale, saying the deal would “support the foreign policy and national security objectives of the United States.”

“This sale furthers US national security and foreign policy interests, and supports the long-term security of Saudi Arabia and the Gulf region in the face of Iranian and other regional threats,” the statement said.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
The first of two Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptors is launched during a successful intercept test. DoD photo courtesy of Missile Defense Agency.

Washington deployed THAAD, which is used to guard against ballistic-missile attacks, to South Korea this year for defense against North Korea.

Iran maintains one of the largest ballistic-missile programs in the Middle East, seeing it as a key element of defense against the United States and other opponents, including Israel and Gulf Arab states.

Both Washington and Saudi Arabia accuse Tehran of aggressive and disruptive behavior in the region.

Asperiores odit

17 photos that show the pain of MPs getting Tazed and maced

The training to carry oleoresin capsicum (pepper spray) or a Tazer generally requires that a military police officer experience the sting of their weapon before they can carry it. Some troops are even required to recertify and be sprayed and Tazed every six months.


Here are 17 photos and one video that show what the training is like:

1. Pepper spray, training opens with the service member getting a blast straight to the face.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Lance Cpl. Andrew Kuppers

2. The spray forces the eyes closed and irritates the skin.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Cory D. Polom

3. In most cases, the students have to complete certain tasks and training lanes after being sprayed.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: North Carolina National Guard Tech. Sgt. Brian E. Christiansen

4. Part of the training lane is fighting against a simulated aggressor while still blinded.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Marine corp Cpl. Khoa Pelczar

5. Students may be required to fight with batons or riot gear.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Army Staff Sgt. Russell Bassett

6. Trying to use weapons while under the spray’s effects is especially challenging.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Army Spc. Justin A. Naylor

7. But the soldiers are expected to force their way through.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Maria Blanchard

8. Near the end of the training, the students will usually have to subdue a subject.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Marine corp Cpl. Khoa Pelczar

9. Once they finish the lane, they can rinse out the spray.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Army Spc. Robert Holland

10. Removing the chemical agents is a welcome step.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: North Carolina National Guard Tech. Sgt. Brian E. Christiansen

11. It takes a lot of water to get the oleoresin capsicum off.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Scott Dunn

12. Even after rinsing, the eyes and face will likely be sore and inflamed for a while.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: US Coast Guard PA2 Tom Sperduto

13. Tazers are an entirely different beast.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Screengrab US Marine Corps Cpl. Joey Holeman

14. The shock of the Tazer can immediately incapacitate a trainee.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Screengrab US Marine Corps Cpl. Joey Holeman

15. The faces of those being shocked are usually pretty funny.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Screengrab US Army Sgt. Stephanie Logue

16. Other troops will support the students during the shock so they won’t hurt themselves as they fall.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Screengrab US Marine Corps Cpl. Joey Holeman

17. Attempting to resist the 50,000 volt shock is useless as the Tazer overwhelms the nervous system.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Screengrab US Marine Corps Cpl. Joey Holeman

To see Marines going through pepper spray, Tazer, and riot control training, check out the video below:

NOW: How it feels to get attacked by a military working dog

Asperiores odit

Assault on Germany in World War Two

In 1944, the Allies fought their way from the beaches of Normandy towards German soil. Their sites were firmly set on pushing all the way to Hitler’s capital Berlin and putting an end to WWII. Success in Europe required soldiers with a wide variety of skills. Robert Weiss was a US Army forward observer. His mission was to move ahead of the troops and find targets for the artillery, but being out in front placed him closer to the enemy and a greater risk of being cut off from his comrades. These are his experiences In His Own Words.

Asperiores odit

D-Day Diary

1994 was the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Throughout that year, The Honor Project sat down with dozens of veterans off the Normandy Invasion to hear their stories and to put these Heroes of Our Nation On Record. O.B. Hill was a member of the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, one of four regiments of the 82nd Airborne Division. In this Episode, he recounts dramatic stories of his training and combat experiences and he eloquently expresses his thoughts on the nature of war and and how it impacted him and his fellow paratroopers.

Asperiores odit

Vote Home Bru

/pp.home-header {/pp background: #000 !important;}/pp


N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains

Thanks for Voting!

Come back tomorrow for another chance to vote for your favorite act

Don’t forget to visit the Base*FEST site for more info on the NAS Penscola Base*FEST, October 7th, 2017.

var exdate=new Date();exdate.setHours(23);exdate.setMinutes(59);exdate.setSeconds(59);document.cookie=’IVotedMusic=1; expires=’+exdate+’; path=/; domain=.wearethemighty.com’;

Asperiores odit

Turkey raises alarm with purchase of Russian-made S-400 missile system

Turkey finalized its purchase of the Russian-made S-400 surface-to-air missile system earlier this month.


The acquisition has stirred concern in other NATO countries since it was first reported several months ago, and the sale comes at time of increased tensions between Ankara and the West, the US in particular, over the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as well as the US-led campaign against ISIS in Syria.

Turkish state-run news agency Anadolu appeared to make pointed references to the S-400’s potential use against NATO and US planes on Sept. 20, when it tweeted out an infographic displaying the specifications of the S-400 and which US planes it could shoot down.

The graphic, as noted by Military Times, says the S-400 can react to targets in less than 10 seconds and can hit targets at a range up to 250 miles while traveling at about 10,000 mph. It also says the system can eliminate such US aircraft as the B-52 and B-1 bombers; F-15, F-16, and F-22 fighters; as well as surveillance aircraft and Tomahawk missiles.

 

Ankara’s purchase of the S-400 raised alarm among other NATO countries for the consequences it would have for military cooperation as well as the signals it appeared to send about the contentious diplomatic relationships within the defense alliance.

Militarily, the missile system would not be interoperable with NATO defense systems and would not be subject to the same restrictions on deployments, meaning Turkey could put it in places like the Armenian border or Aegean coast.

The S-400 is Russia’s most sophisticated missile-defense system (though Turkey is unlikely to get the most advanced version). It can detect and target manned and unmanned aircraft and missiles, and hit targets up to 250 miles away.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
SA-400. Photo by Vitality Kuzmin

A Turkish official said this summer that the S-400 would not come with friend-or-foe-identification system, meaning it could be used against any target. Turkey has said that a domestic firm would install software so it could distinguish between friend and foe aircraft, but there are doubts that process is technically feasible.

Diplomatically, the sale seemed to be the culmination of a period of frosty relations between Turkey and its partners in Europe and the US.

Ankara has clashed with Germany in the wake of a failed coup against Erdogan, after Berlin criticized the Turkish government for a crackdown on people accused of involvement.

Turkish-US relations have also suffered because of the war in Syria, where the US backs Kurdish fighters who Turkey sees as aligned with the Kurdish PKK, which both the US and Turkey have designated a terrorist group.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Kurdish PKK Guerilla. Photo from Flickr user Kurdishstruggle

Turkey has threatened to target US-backed Kurdish fighters in Syria several times.

The deal also underscores for many in the West who believe there is an increasingly cozy relationship between Russia and Turkey.

Some view the sale as another step by Moscow to undermine NATO — a sentiment Russian presidential adviser Vladimir Kozhin may have tried to nurture earlier this month by saying, “I can only guarantee that all decisions taken on this contract strictly comply with our strategic interests.”

Asperiores odit

Amphibious Assault in the Pacific

By 1943, the war in the Pacific burned in its full fury. On November 20th, the Allies launched the first amphibious assault against heavily defended beaches in US history. The 2nd division of the US Marine Corps, used amphibious tractors and assault boats to reach the beaches of the Tarawa atoll, an enemy stronghold protected by 5,000 hardened Imperial Japanese marines. Ed Moore and Tommy Reed were decorated veterans of the 2nd Marine Division during the island campaigns in the Pacific War.

Asperiores odit

Declassified photos show the US’s final preparations for the only nuclear weapons attacks in history

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives


On August 6th and 9th of 1945, the United States dropped atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, causing significant death and destruction in both places. To this day, the bombings remain history’s only acts of nuclear warfare.

A lot has been established about the immediate preparations for the dropping of the bombs, known as “Little Boy” and “Fat Man,” which were loaded onto airplanes on the North Field airbase on Tinian Island, part of the Northern Mariana Islands to the south of Japan.

Until recently few photographs were available of the final hours before the bombings. But newly declassified pictures shed additional light on the procedures leading up to the nuclear attacks, giving a chilling glimpse into how and where the most destructive bombs ever used in warfare were loaded.

(First seen on AlternativeWars.com)

Soldiers check the casings on the “Fat Man” atomic bomb. Multiple test bombs were created on Tinian Island. All were roughly identical to an operational bomb, even though they lacked the necessary equipment to detonate.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

On the left, geophysicist and Manhattan Project participant Francis Birch marks the bomb unit that would become “Little Boy” while Norman Ramsey, who would later win the Nobel Prize in Physics, looks on.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

A technician applies sealant and putty to the crevices of “Fat Man,” a final preparation to make sure the environment inside the bomb would be stable enough to sustain a full impact once the bomb was detonated.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Soldiers and workers sign their names and other messages on the nose of “Fat Man.”

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Here’s a closer look.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

“Fat Man” is loaded onto a transport trailer and given a final once-over.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

The bomb is then escorted to the nearby North Field airbase on Tinian, shrouded in tarp.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

At the airfield, “Fat Man” is lined up over a pit specifically constructed for it, from which it is then loaded into the plane that dropped it over Nagasaki on August 9, 1945.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Both pits for “Little Boy” and “Fat Man,” each roughly 8 feet by 12 feet, still exist today on the island and now serve as a memorial.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photos: National Archives (L) and Flickr/Jeffrey Tripp (R)

The bomb and its trailer are lowered down into the pit using a hydraulic lift.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Workers check “Little Boy” one last time, keeping the tarp on for security reasons. They used a similar lowering procedure for “Fat Man” three days later.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Once “Little Boy” is ready, the Enola Gay, a Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber, is reversed and positioned over the trench.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

The tarp is removed and the bomb is readied for loading.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Using the hydraulic lift, “Little Boy” is carefully raised and loaded into the belly of the Enola Gay.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

Once inside the plane, the bomb is secured and all connections and equipment are checked again.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: National Archives

From there, both “Little Boy” and “Fat Man” were flown over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, and detonated. World War II ended shortly afterwards, but at a cost: an estimated 250,000 people were killed or injured in the attacks, most of them civilians.

N. Korea provided just 1 dog tag with 55 sets of war remains
Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Hohum

Video of the preparation and loading also exists.

More from Business Insider:

This article originally appeared at Business Insider Defense. Copyright 2015. Follow BI Defense on Twitter.

Asperiores odit

survey

/pp.home-header{overflow: hidden;}/pp.ribbon {display: inline;}/pp.ribbon:before, .ribbon:after{/pp content: url(http://www.wearethemighty.com/wp-content/themes/watm3/build/star_stripe.svg);/pp display: inline-block;/pp padding-left: 10px;/pp width: 0;/pp transform: scale(1.5, 1.5);/pp top: -15px;/pp position: relative;/pp}/pp.ribbon:before {/pp transform: scale(-1.5, 1.5);/pp}/pp.surveyheader H1{/pp font-weight: 600;/pp margin: -10px;/pp}/pp.maru-survey-btn {/pp background: #002d73;/pp padding: 8px 15px;/pp border: 0;/pp color: #fff;/pp margin: 10px;/pp display: inline-block;/pp font-size: 30px;/pp}/pp.rules {/pp font-size: small;/pp color: #666;/pp}/pp.maru-details {/pp max-width: 900px;/pp margin: auto;/pp}/pp@media only screen and (max-device-width: 559px) and (min-device-width: 320px) {/pp .ribbon:before, .ribbon:after{/pp top: 0px;/pp transform: initial;/pp }/pp .ribbon:before {/pp transform: scaleX(-1);/pp }/pp .maru-details {/pp padding: 0 10px;/pp width: 100%;}/pp}/pp


THE MIGHTY

SURVEY GIVE AWAY

We Are the Mighty has partnered with a research firm, Maru/Matchbox, to provide an opportunity for you to share your opinions on how you use and interact with media and technology in your daily life.

This online survey will take about 12 minutes to complete, and can be done on either a computer or mobile device. As a thank you for your time and input, once you complete the survey you will be able to enter our sweepstakes to win one of 5 prizes! Winners will have their choice of either a Playstation 4, a Microsoft Xbox One S, a Nintendo Switch or an Amazon Gift Card for $300! Read the sweepstakes rules here.