History

The odd and beautiful art form of the Afghan war rug

(Photo by Cpl. Mariah Best)

As troops walk through the bazaars of Afghanistan, they'll always see the same collection of things for sale. Bootleg DVDs of shows that weren't even interesting during their time, horrible knockoffs of brand-name clothing, souvenirs with the names of neighboring countries (mostly) scraped off, and gorgeous, handcrafted rugs depicting the mujahedin fighting the Soviets.


It's almost surreal. Among the piles of junk are these masterpieces marred with spelling errors.

Afghanistan has a history filled with constant warfare. So, it makes sense that their cultural art reflects this. Afghan carpets have been a staple of the culture's art for hundreds of years, but it was during the 1979 Soviet invasion that the rugs were used as a form of quiet protest.

To every other vet who's been to Afghanistan, it's nice knowing their most common design has barely changed. (Courtesy Photo)

Their AK-47s and tanks were woven into the rugs next to geometric shapes and flowers. The Baluch or Tup-e-Tung (or just "war rugs") began appearing all over the country. The tradition continued well into America's intervention in 2001. Contemporary war rugs now include the attack on the World Trade Center and drones.

The rugs are often so well made and sell for such a high price, a single rug sale could bring a family out of poverty. (Photo by Sgt. Heidi Agostini)

Funnily enough, the Afghan people prefer not having a constant reminder of the warfare that has plagued their homeland for generations. However, Westerners go crazy for them. War rugs almost exclusively sold to foreigners can fetch up to $25,000 at auction — but are often bartered for much less.

While it's true that they're very well-crafted and are the cause for much employment in the country, it still needs to be said that the U.S. Department of Labor recognizes that some are created using child labor. The rugs sold on U.S. and NATO military bases in Afghanistan are carefully vetted to avoid the exploitation of children.

Still a worthwhile addition to any vet's collection. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Teddy Wade)