Military Life

4 of the best things about being stationed at Camp Pendleton

(Photo by Sgt. Christopher O'Quin)

Twentynine Palms, Camp Lejeune, and Quantico are just a few of the Marine Corps bases that house those who've earned the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor. Although the various duty stations each offer their own benefits, none compare to the awesomeness that is Camp Pendleton.

In 1942, the government purchased land in Southern California from a private owner for $4,239,062. The property was soon named in honor of Maj. Gen. Joseph H. Pendleton for his outstanding service, thus creating Camp Pendleton. Some might tell you there are downsides to be stationed there, but, in general, it's considered the best. Here's why.


1. It has everything you need

Shopping, recreation centers, and schools are just a few amenities that make the historic property a full-scale, working city. The Camp has been designed and developed to fulfill the every need of those stationed within the gates.

The Marine Corps Exchange located on the main side of the base. If you can't find what you're looking for here, it's not Marine Corps-quality.

2. There're so many activities

The San Diego Zoo, Sea World, and Universal Studios are just a few of the places you can take your family to visit on a sunny afternoon. The drives will take you typically take around an hour or so, depending on traffic, but since you live so close, you don't have to spend money on a hotel room — which makes sh*t cheaper.

3. That SoCal weather

Do you like doing PT in the pouring rain? Well, if you do, Camp Pendleton isn't the place for you. According to U.S. Climate data, Camp Pendleton receives an average of 13.3 inches of rain per year. Compare that to the national average of 32.25 inches.

Camp Pendleton is starting to sound pretty impressive, isn't it?

Visit Camp Pendleton today and notice there's not a cloud in f*cking skies!

(Photo by Marine Sgt. April L. Price)

4. It has its own beach

The beach in Del Mar has places where you can camp or rent small cottages for a few days. These private areas can get you close to the ocean enough to hear waves crash onto the shoreline while keeping you near enough to the base to hear the Marines call out their famous and well-rehearsed cadences as they run by.

It's a perfect location.

Members of the Western Army Infantry Regiment, Japan Ground Self Defense Force, and Marines with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit play a game of football on the Del Mar Beach at the conclusion of Exercise Iron Fist 2013

(Photo by Sgt. Christopher O'Quin)