History

A Korean War POW escaped from captivity after 55 years

In June 2008, a 74-year-old North Korean farmer and former coal miner was swimming across the Tumen River, where it makes the border between the reclusive North Korean regime and Communist China. He was escaping the Hermit Kingdom like many North Koreans before him, except Kim Jin-Soo wasn't North Korean.

Keep reading... Show less

5 reasons the F-15 might be the best fighter of all time

Before the development of the F-22 Raptor, the F-15 Eagle ruled the skies. It replaced the vaunted F-111 as the U.S. military's primary fighter bomber and, for much of its life, it was the fast-moving air superiority fighter, king of all air superiority fighters. In much of the world, it still rules — and there are many, many reasons why.

Keep reading... Show less
History

That time the Louisiana National Guard celebrated 'Saudi Gras' in Desert Storm

Everyone who deploys during a holiday makes a special effort to feel as if they aren't really missing it. No matter how short the war is, no one wants to miss one of those crucial days. Even if the entire buildup and fighting lasted just a few months, you still want that piece of home. The Louisiana National Guard was no different in the Gulf War. No way were they going to miss Mardi Gras.

Keep reading... Show less

The 8 biggest differences between military and civilian prison

From the moment you don the uniform of the U.S. military, the biggest threat looming over your nascent career is being forced to "turn big rocks into little rocks" at Leavenworth.

Keep reading... Show less

Why a judge willingly shared this green beret's jail sentence

A fellow veteran goes "into the foxhole" with another vet.

Joe Serna escaped death so many times while deployed with the Army's Special Forces. He was blown up by explosive devices on multiple occasions over three combat deployments to Afghanistan. One threw him from his vehicle, another nearly drowned him in an MRAP in an irrigation canal, and a Taliban fighter detonated a grenade in his face. Like many combat veterans of his caliber, both mental and physical wounds followed him home.

After his medical retirement, alcohol-related events landed him in hot water with the law until the day he violated his probation and ended up in front of North Carolina Judge Lou Olivera.

Keep reading... Show less
History

World War II's most decorated woman was a housewife-turned-spy

French-born Odette Sansom was a sickly child. She wrestled with a slew of childhood illnesses, including a bout with polio that left her blind for three years. The adversity she overcame as a youth was good preparation for what she would do as an adult: joining the British "Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare."

Keep reading... Show less

This amazing robot could be the future of amphibious drones

Marines can fight in the air, on the ground and at sea – and soon they'll have a robot that can tag along for at least two of those. Pliant Energy Systems' Velox robot can track you on both land and sea. Snow, sand, ice, mud, it doesn't matter the terrain; the Velox can follow you anywhere. But its true "natural" habitat is underwater, where its undulating propulsion system and efficient electrical drive can keep up with any target.

Keep reading... Show less
Military Life

An American is now a senior ISIS commander in Syria

In April, 2015, the son of a New Jersey pizza shop owner left the United States. His destination was an Islamic State training camp in Syria. Shortly after arriving, he allegedly emerged in a video posted to social media, beheading Kurdish fighters captured by ISIS. Now, Zulfi Hoxha may be in command of ISIS fighters in the country.

Keep reading... Show less
History

The daring sabotage raid that kept Nazis from getting The Bomb

For much of the Second World War, German engineers and scientists were at the top of their game in developing nuclear fission. As early as 1939, the best minds in Germany were put to work on splitting the atom. They were attempting to use heavy water to control the fission process. Their main source of heavy water production was in occupied Norway, which was a devastating mistake.

They would never get the chance to develop an atomic bomb because Norwegian resistance fighters would blow up the heavy water facilities rather than help the Nazis win World War II.

Keep reading... Show less