This WWII veteran played a song for the sniper trying to kill him

Just two weeks after American forces landed at Normandy on D-Day, Jack Leroy Tueller, one of those Americans, was taking sniper fire with the rest of his unit. Tueller played the sniper a beautiful song from his trumpet.

He was orphaned at age five, but before World War II, Jack Tueller would play first-chair trumpet in the Brigham Young University orchestra. After going to war as a pilot, his trumpet skills would serve him well, along with at least one German soldier and both their families.

Jack Tueller served in the Army Air Forces in the European Theater, flying more than 100 combat missions in a P-47 Thunderbolt. He earned the Silver Star and the Distinguished Flying Cross, among others. After the war, he became a missilier in the newly-formed U.S. Air Force and would serve in Korea and Vietnam as well. But his most memorable military moment would always be a night in Normandy when the power of music risked — and saved — his life.

It was a dark, rainy night in Northern France when then-Capt. Tueller decided to play his trumpet for everyone within earshot. The only problem was that not everyone in the area would be very receptive to a song in the dead of night — especially not the sniper trying to shoot him dead.

Keep reading... Show less
History

5 reasons bourbon is the most American drink of all time

Bourbon is a liquor that has a place in your hand all-year round. Whether it's sipping a mint julep on a hot summer's day or spiking the egg nog (like George Washington might) to make Christmas with the family that much more fun (or bearable), there is just never a bad time for a bourbon beverage.

Despite being named for a house of French kings, there are myriad reasons why we should take a moment to take stock (literally and figuratively) of America's distinctive, home-grown, and distilled liquor.

And if you want to get technical, those French Bourbon kings helped George Washington and the Continental Army create America, so show some respect.

Bourbon's all-American status goes well beyond the fact that it's an American-born corn-fed whiskey created by a Baptist minister in Kentucky — although I can't think of a more American birth for anything.

Unless you can figure out how to get cheese, baseball, and apple pie in there, too.

A 1964 act of Congress made bourbon the official spirit of the United States of America, or as they put it, "America's Native Spirit." Which says a lot, both about America and the U.S. Congress... and probably the people who voted for them.

It should be noted that many, many great bourbons are Kentucky-based but it isn't necessary for a bourbon to be made in Kentucky for it to be considered a bourbon. This is not champagne we're talking about. The necessary qualifications for a whiskey to be a bourbon are as follows:

Tag ID: watmfs_728x90_970x90_300x250_320x50_InArticle1
  • It's made with 51 percent corn.
  • It must be aged in a new white oak barrel, with the inside charred before adding liquor.
  • It can't have any color or flavor additives
  • Bourbon must be between 80 and 160 proof (40-80 percent alcohol)
There are real reasons why bourbon is a product that could only have been American-made. So, put that vodka-soda down, comrade, and get a bottle of Evan Williams for the coming July 4th holiday. Your friends and family will thank you.
Keep reading... Show less
History

6 incredible facts about 'Flying the Hump' in World War II

"The Hump" was the nickname Allied pilots gave the airlift operation that crossed the Himalayan foothills into China. It was the Army Air Force's most dangerous airlift route, but it was the only way to supply Chinese forces fighting Japan — and things weren't going well for China.

World War II began in 1937 for Chiang Ki-Shek's nationalist China. By the time the United States began running supplies to the Chinese forces fighting Japan, the Western part of the country was firmly controlled by the invading Japanese. The Japanese also controlled Burma, on India's Eastern border, cutting off the last land route to the Chinese. Aid would have to come by air and American planes would have to come from the West — over the "Roof of the World."

But getting there was terribly inefficient.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Why Navy SEALs will storm the beaches of Normandy in 2018

Jumping into freezing water is just part of the legacy of being a Navy SEAL. During World War II, the U.S. Navy Combat Demolition Units were just a handful of guys equipped only with a pair of shorts, a knife, and maybe some explosives. But those amphibious roots are still close to the hearts of the Navy special warfare community — that's why they still call themselves "Frogmen."

Some 74 years ago, in the English Channel during the predawn hours of June 6, 1944, these Navy Combat Demolition Units braved the freezing waters — not to mention the thousands of Nazi guns pointed at the water's edge.

They were trained for this.

They weren't necessarily trained to be the secret first wave of invaders up against some of the most fortified positions in the world. No, instead they were trained to win against any and all odds or obstacles. These men were the precursor to modern day SEALs, moving to do their part on the beaches before the D-Day Landings.

That's how SEAL training works to this day. Recruits are taught to overcome the things they think can't be done. Now, in tribute to those few who landed at occupied France well before the rest of the Allies, 30 current and former Navy SEALs, as well as some "gritty" civilians, will recreate those NCDU landings.

Today's SEAL reenactors will do a seven-mile swim to land at Normandy, where they'll scale the cliffs of Omaha Beach to place a wreath in memorial. At that point, they'll gear up with 44-pound rucks to do a 30-kilometer march to Saint-Lô.

Tag ID: watmfs_728x90_970x90_300x250_320x50_InArticle1

Why? To raise awareness (and funds) for the Navy SEAL Heritage Museum in Fort Pierce, Florida — and the wide range of programs they offer to support family members of SEALs who fell in combat, doing things only the U.S. special operations community would ever dare.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

7 songs that will impress your unit at karaoke night

If you spend any time at all in the military after passing basic training, chances are good that you're going to end up in a bar with members of your unit. Chances are very good that one of those evenings will involve karaoke.

Karaoke doesn't care if you're a good singer or a bad singer (although the people subjected to your voice might have an opinion). Karaoke just needs your active and (hopefully) positive participation. Remember, even if you suck, you still had the intestinal fortitude to get up on a stage before a crowd full of drunken strangers — and that's a victory of its own.

What that crowd is most likely to judge you on is your choice of song. If you get up in front of your coworkers and sing "I Touch Myself" at the top of your lungs, you will never, ever live it down. In fact, you might as well change your name and go into hiding.

songs to impress your unit cable guy My name wasn't "Stilwell" until I attempted a Bjork song after three shots of Cabo Wabo.

Your audience will forgive a lot, especially your coworkers and battle buddies, as long as you don't make it too difficult to forgive. So, make sure you get up on that stage with energy and good humor. Have a good time and the audience will have one with you.

Before we begin, let's go over a few ground rules. First, if you're with your unit, remember that you'll likely have to see these same people every day for the next four-to-six years — but never forget to read your audience. If you're in a bar where everyone keeps rapping Dr. Dre and they're really good at it, maybe save your rendition of "Friends In Low Places" for a more receptive crowd.

Tag ID: watmfs_728x90_970x90_300x250_320x50_InArticle1
Keep reading... Show less
Military Life

David Goldfein is the leader the military needs right now

Another Memorial Day has come and gone and, along with it, comes another report from the family of a service member who was killed in action about encountering a man in civilian clothes at Arlington National Cemetery. Calling himself Dave, the man talked to a Gold Star spouse for a bit, then moved on.

The wife of the fallen service member had no idea she was talking to Gen. David Goldfein, the 21st Chief of Staff of the Air Force.

She only found out because her friend noticed the coin that "Dave" left on the headstone of her husband — the coin of his office. She posted the story on social media some time later, which was confirmed by the popular Air Force Facebook page Air Force amn/nco/snco.

That's the kind of person General Goldfein is. This isn't an isolated incident. On Memorial Day 2017, an airman at Arlington spotted a man in his dress blues walking among the graves at Section 60 — the resting place for those who fell in Iraq or Afghanistan — putting his hand on each for a moment of reflection.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

This simple exercise will help determine if you really want to be a sniper

Quora is the ultimate resource for crowdsourcing knowledge. If you're unfamiliar, you ask the Quora world a question and anyone with expertise (and some without it) will respond. One user asked the world what service he should join if he wanted to be a sniper. One Marine veteran gave him some necessary information.

Choosing what branch to join can be tough for anyone. Different branches have different lifestyles, they come with different job opportunities, and they each have their own difficulties. If you're 100-percent sure you want to be a sniper, that doesn't narrow your selection. At all.

Yes, the Air Force has snipers.

To be fair, the asker asked, "Which branch is better?" Many users thoughtfully answered his question with answers ranging from the Coast Guard's HITRON precision marksmen to arguing the finer points about why Army snipers are superior to SEALs and Marine Scout Snipers (go ahead and debate that amongst yourselves).

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

6 things military veterans will love about History's 'Six'

The second season of History's Six is underway and there are a few new faces. Olivia Munn joins the cast as CIA officer Gina Cline. Walton Goggins returns as Richard "Rip" Taggart, who was dramatically rescued in the last season. Led by Barry Sloans' Joe "Bear" Graves, the team will hit Eastern Europe (even as far as Chechnya) this season to track down a terror network.

Veterans are hard to please when it comes to depicting military life and veterans onscreen. We demand accuracy. We demand realism. Most of the time, we find ourselves disappointed. History's Six will not disappoint you.

Suspend your disbelief for a moment, fellow veterans. To be perfectly fair, there's a lot to like and a lot to overlook when it comes to Six — just like any other show on television. Not everyone is going to be a fan. But there is so much more to like from Six. Even the most discerning veteran will find that Six is better than they expected.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

This is "The World's Leading Distributor of MiG Parts"

The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom acquired many nicknames over its storied career: Snoopy, Old Smokey, St. Louis Slugger, the Flying Anvil, and many more. The best, by far, came from the sheer number of Soviet-built MiGs taken down by the plane.

The F-4 was truly an amazing aircraft. Even at the end of its service life, it was winning simulated air battles against the United States' latest and greatest airframes, including the F-15 Eagle, which is still in service today. Even though it was considered an ugly aircraft by pilots of the time, it's hard to argue with 280 enemy MiG kills — which is how it acquired its best nickname, "The World's Leading Distributor of MiG Parts."

After being introduced in 1960, it was acquired by the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Navy as an interceptor and fighter-bomber. In Vietnam, the Phantom was used as a close-air support aircraft and also fulfilled roles as aerial reconnaissance and as an air superiority fighter.

U.S. Air Force Col. Robin Olds lands his F-4 Phantom II fighter, SCAT XVII, on his final flight as Wing Commander of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, Ubon Thailand in Sept. 1967.

All of the last American pilots, weapon systems officers, and radar intercept officers to attain ace status did so in F-4 Phantom II fighters over Vietnam — against MiGs.

Keep reading... Show less