GAMING

This is why becoming a Spartan from 'Halo' would actually suck

When you think about the Halo series of video games, you probably reminisce about a great story, an excellent multiplayer experience, and a slew of badass weaponry that makes us yearn for the future. If you've played even a single story mission, then you know about the Spartans: highly trained, augmented super soldiers designed to withstand any condition and defeat any enemy. In theory, it sounds pretty cool to be a Spartan. In reality, however, it'd suck. Majorly.

In the world of Halo, the SPARTAN-II program started as a way to combat insurrectionists and later became a way to stem the advance of the alien empire known as The Covenant. The goal was to pair advanced exoskeleton technology with a mechanically and biologically enhanced soldier.

But the process of creating a Spartan, were it to happen in real life, would be brutal, unethical, and extremely controversial. Here's what a to-be Spartan would experience:

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5 of the biggest ways the Marines prepares you for college

College is an amazing thing. In fact, there're few better ways to spend your time after the Marines than going to get an education in whatever way you see fit. Chances are, you got out because you were done with the military lifestyle and you were ready to move forward with your life. You were ready to find the next big challenge.

Contrary to what your chain of command told you, getting out of the military does not guarantee that you'll spend your days living in a van down by the river. Not only did you build an arsenal of great life skills while in the service, you also earned yourself the G.I. Bill, which, in some cases, pays you to go to college.

Don't be nervous at the prospect. The truth is, the Marines (or any other branch for that matter) has prepared you for the adventure of college in ways you might not have noticed.

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Entertainment

The 3 reasons why 'Generation Kill' feels so authentic

Any post-9/11 Marine could easily sit down and binge through all seven episodes of the HBO miniseries, Generation Kill. In fact, if you've sat in your squad bay at Camp Wilson while there for a training exercise, you've probably already watched it a few times. Why is it so popular with the Devil Dogs? Simple: it feels pinpoint accurate.

There aren't a whole lot of accurate depictions of Marines out there. At least, not many that really, 100% capture the true nature and mannerisms of Marines — the Infantry-type especially. That's what sets Generation Kill apart from the rest. Based on the novel written by Evan Wright, a reporter for Rolling Stone, who was embedded with the 1st Recon Battalion during the invasion of Iraq, Mr. Wright set out with the goal of showing Marines as they were, unfiltered.

And that he did — but the miniseries adaptation took it a few steps further. There were aspects in production that not only honored Mr. Wright's material, but Marine culture as well:

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History

This is what you should know about the 'Aztec Eagles'

Though a select few get most of the credit, a lot of countries were involved in the Allied efforts of World War II. There were so many moving parts that it's easy to forget that certain groups, including our own U.S. Coast Guard, were actively involved. While we might make jokes about Canadians being overly polite today, we must certainly not forget that they kicked some serious ass in Europe. However, there's another country that played a significant role in the global conflict that many seem to gloss over outside of discussing the Zimmerman Telegram: Mexico.

There was no real shortage of volunteers during WWII, but more help was always appreciated. That's where Mexico comes in. Pissed about losing oil ships in the Gulf, Mexico declared war on Axis powers in 1942. Shortly thereafter, Mexico became one of the only Latin American countries to send troops overseas.

The most widely recognized group to deploy was the Mexican Army's Escuadrón 201 — the Aztec Eagles. Here's what you should know:

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5 leadership lessons you can learn in the Marines

If there's anything the United States Marine Corps is known for (aside from striking fear into the hearts of America's enemies), it's teaching young Americans how to be leaders. The mission of the Marine Corps is simple: make Marines and win battles. But to find success in the latter, someone has to teach Marines how to lead other Marines into combat. That's exactly why a big part of boot camp is instilling the idea that every Marine is a leader in their own way.

Granted, not everyone who serves in the Marines becomes a good leader — those rare even among those who enjoy a long, illustrious career — but everyone learns leadership skills. If you move into a leadership position over the course of your service, you'll likely learn these lessons:

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This is what basic Marine infantry training is like

Of course there's rain.

If you know anything about Marines, you know that we've built up one h*** of a reputation over the past 243 years. Whether it's destroying our enemies or our profound capability to drink an entire town dry of alcohol, one thing is for sure — we've made a name for ourselves. But, the biggest and most important reputation is the one we have on the battlefield.

But the infantry plays the biggest role — closing with and destroying the enemy. Some may even regard us as the best in this respect but, to be the best, you have to train like the best from the ground up. This all starts at the Marine Corps School of Infantry so here are some things you should know about how the Marine Corps makes Infantry Marines:

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5 big reasons why you should've gone to the Marine Corps Ball

So, the time for you to go to your first Marine Corps Birthday Ball came and went. Everyone got together to celebrate that time a bunch of drunks gathered at a bar in Philly and started a world-class war-fighting organization. And yet here you are, a couple hundred years later, so disillusioned by your command that you didn't spend the $80ish on the ticket.

The Marine Corps has a long-standing history of warfare and professionalism. Our fighting spirit has been recognized by forces all over the world, both those we've fought against and those that've fought at our side. The Birthday Ball is a celebration of this history; that's why we wear those sexy dress blues that the first Marines wore into battle.

Just because you don't like your command or the politics of the military doesn't mean you should skip out. Here's why you should buy a ticket next year.

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5 of the best things that can happen while you're in the field

When you're infantry, your life is going out on field operations to train for war or, you know, actually going to war. Field ops, in short, can be miserable. It's always raining, you have to eat garbage in a pouch, and there's that one staff NCO who won't let up on being a d*ck about grooming standards. That being said, there are little things that happen out there every so often that make things just a little more bearable.

You're going to eat, breathe, train, and sleep in the rain and the mud for days on end. But sometimes, your battalion will have mercy on your poor grunt soul and deploy some niceties that will restore that waning glimmer of hope.

Here are some of those things:

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5 of the most accurate military representations on screen

A common gripe among those in the military is that there aren't enough accurate representations of us in film and on television. There's plenty of representation, sure, but "accurate" is the operative term, here — and Hollywood tends to get more wrong than they do right. Every once in a blue moon, however, you'll stumble upon a tiny golden nugget truth on screen. That special piece of media will ignite a fire within you and you'll be forced to stand up and shout, "that right there! THAT is what it was like!" to all your civilian friends.

Now, we're not saying Hollywood does a piss-poor job. Service members have a tendency to be extremely nit-picky when it comes to military depictions on screen. We see even the smallest flaw and we say, "nope. They got it wrong again." Realistically, there are many reasons why that happens, but it's most likely because they didn't have someone on set who knew what they were talking about.

But when they get things right? Well, you get the items on this list:

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