SPORTS

This is how the Army ended up with a mule for a mascot

Take a look at the jerseys for the sports teams of the United States Military Academy at West Point. At first glance, you'd probably assume that their mascot is a golden knight — which is strange, because they're known as the "Black Knights." What's even more strange is that their mascot isn't a knight at all; it's a mule.

That's right. The West Point mascot is the crossbreed between a horse and a donkey — just as it is for the rest of the US Army. It isn't the best looking animal by any stretch of the imagination, nor is it anywhere close to being the most majestic. But all of the things it represents — strength, wisdom, and stubbornness determination — sum up the Army as a whole.

Keep reading... Show less
GAMING

Yes, the mini-nuke launcher was a thing and yes, it was a terrible idea

In the game series Fallout, one of the weapons most coveted by players is a portable mini-nuke launcher that, as you might imagine, is capable of destroying basically anything it touches. It fits perfectly within the game's theme of roaming across the apocalyptic wasteland, dispensing wanton destruction.

Bethesda, the developers behind Fallout, weren't just pulling something out of thin air when they designed the digital weapon. In the late 1950s, when the threat of nuclear war with the Soviets was lurking around the corner, the U.S. actually created a functioning mini-nuke launcher of their very own.

It was called the M-29 Davy Crockett Weapon System. And the reason it never really made it out of initial testing was because it was probably the most poorly designed weapon system the U.S. military ever thought would work.

Keep reading... Show less

5 ways to make mandatory fun days actually, you know... fun

Ahh, organizational days. On paper, it sounds like a great time. Why not have everyone in the unit come together to relieve stress for an afternoon and enjoy some quality team-cohesion time? Here's the problem: Troops very rarely ever have a good time at what is mockingly referred to as a "mandatory fun day."

If you're in a leadership position and you're honestly expecting an organizational day to raise the morale of your troops, then you're going to need to do a few things different. Don't worry, we're not about to suggest major changes or anything that could jeopardize the professionalism of your unit, but you should lighten up and actually try to make sure your troops enjoy themselves if an increase in morale is your intended goal. Makes sense, right?

Try these:

Keep reading... Show less
History

Why artillerymen should bring back their distinctive 'Redlegs'

Every combat arms branch within the United States Army comes with a long legacy. And with that legacy comes an accompanying piece of flair for their respective dress uniforms. Infantrymen rock a baby blue fourragere on their right shoulder, cavalrymen still wear their spurs and stetsons, and even Army aviators sport their very own badges in accordance with their position in the unit.

But long before the blue cords and spurs, another combat arms branch had their own unique uniform accouterment — one that has since been lost to time. Artillerymen once had scarlet red piping that ran down the side of their pant legs. In fact, these stripes were once so iconic that it gave rise to a nickname for artillerymen: "redlegs."

Due to wartime restrictions, artillerymen stopped wearing the red piping during WWI — and it never made a comeback.

Keep reading... Show less

The 13 funniest memes for the week of November 16th

The weeks between major four-day weekends always blow. You get into a rhythm of sitting on your ass, drinking, and playing video games for an extended period of time only to have a few days of extremely intense duty to make up for all the work you've been missing and will miss over the holidays.

Meanwhile, you're getting pressure to get that damn certificate in to the training room because Uncle Sam won't let you take block leave unless you've proven to them that your car isn't sh*t and you won't drive while tired.

But on the bright side, it's payday week and there're a lot of video games coming out for you to waste your paycheck on. Anyway, enjoy some memes.

Keep reading... Show less

How the Army museum is shaping up to be an amazing tribute to all soldiers

Museums aren't just buildings constructed to hold relics of a bygone era so that bored school kids can sleepily shuffle around them. They're rich representations of lives once lived; they're a way to reflect on those who came before us so that we can learn the history of the men and women who shaped the world we all live in today.

This is what the National Museum of the United States Army, currently under construction at Fort Belvoir, VA, will offer once it's completed in 2019. As a living museum, it will encompass the full military history of the United States Army, from its humble beginnings as ragtag colonial militiamen in 1636 to the elite fighting force it is today — all to inspire the soldiers of tomorrow.

Keep reading... Show less

These are the airborne firefighters that handle the most intense wildfires

Within the military, being airborne comes with a special brand of badassery that you won't find within any non-airborne unit, or, as we call them, "legs." Even more badass are the troops that have proven themselves by jumping directly into combat — like the paratroopers over D-Day or the 75th Rangers at Objective Rhino in Afghanistan.

But jumping into certain danger with nothing but your gear and a parachute isn't something exclusive to the military. There exists a certain breed of firefighters who are so fearless that they are always on-call to jump into newly-formed wildfires.

Meet the Smokejumpers.

Keep reading... Show less

This is why Army officers aren't allowed to carry umbrellas

The United States Military is full of bizarre rules that, at some point, probably served some obscure purpose before being ingrained in tradition. For example, you're not allowed to keep your hands in your pockets. It all began because, apparently, putting your hands in your pockets "detracts from military smartness." I don't know about you, but in my lifetime, I've never equated pocketed hands with being aloof — but the rules are rules. Quit asking questions.

But if you're looking for an antiquated rule that's really nonsensical, look no further than the (now) unwritten rule that states officers of the United States Army cannot carry an umbrella. It might not be an official regulation anymore, but all Army officers generally adhere to the rule regardless, for tradition's sake.

Keep reading... Show less
Veterans

5 reasons why veterans are perfectly suited to become firefighters

After troops leave the service, many of us are left feeling like the skills we learned while on active duty don't perfectly apply to the civilian world. While that couldn't be further from the truth, the idea rings true in the back of many veterans' minds. The truth is that countless employers around the country would scoop up a veteran in a heartbeat.

Now, whether the civilian job will match the high-energy, high-risk, high-reward aspects of military life is another question. But if you're looking for your next challenge, your local fire department is usually taking applications.

The most rewarding part of serving was the ability to give back to your country and your community. Working in the fire department is another way for vets to take a hands-on approach to helping out.

Keep reading... Show less