Veterans

Why this new program is the smartest thing the VA has done recently

Let's be completely honest: Getting veterans the help they need is a tricky task. What works for one person may not work for another. Simply telling veterans they have the option to seek help if they need it is important, yes, but it's not going to pull those who are blind to their own struggles out of the shadows.

There are many veterans who can personally attest to the successes and benefits of the fine mental health professionals within the Veterans Administration. There are others, however, who end up opt for heart-breaking alternatives to talking about their feelings with a stranger. There's no easy solution to getting help to those who don't seek it and there's no magic wand out there that can wish away the pain that our veteran community suffers daily.

But the first step is always going to be opening up about the pain.

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Why the US military needs to seriously rethink 'recruiter goals'

Each year, the United States Armed Forces projects the amount of troops that will exit the service and how many new bodies it needs to fill the gaps in formation. This number is distributed accordingly between the branches and then broken down further for each recruiting station, depending on the location, size of the local population, and typical enlistment rates of each area.

This is, at a very basic level, how recruiter quotas work. If the country is at war, the need for more able-bodied recruits rises to meet the demand. When a war is winding down, as we're seeing today, you would reasonably expect there to be less pressure on recruiters to send Uncle Sam troops — but there's not. Not by a long shot.

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This is what troops do when they're wintered over in Antarctica

Winter sucks everywhere. Sure, the bugs have finally frozen over and you can finally break out that coat you like, but it's cold, you're always late because your car won't defrost in time, and no one seems to remember to tap their brakes when stopping at intersections.

But, as any optimist might tell you, things can always get worse! While it sucks for us up here in the middle of December, it's actually the nicest time to be in Antarctica — nice by Antarctic standards anyway.

It doesn't last, though, as the winters there begin in mid-February and don't let up until mid-November. And don't forget, we have brothers and sisters in the U.S. Armed Forces down there embracing the suck of the coldest temperatures on Earth.

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History

The Donner Party really should have taken the Army's advice

At some point while growing up, every kid is issued a stern warning from their parents to not touch the hot stove when it's on. Most kids take that advice at face value and never risk it. But then there are the other kids; the ones who repeatedly try to poke at the red hot coils. Eventually, there comes a time where the curious kids get burnt.

This is basically what happened to the ill-fated and infamous Donner Party in 1847. History often paints the pioneers as unfortunate travelers, but it also often glosses over the fact that they were issued repeated warnings by the United States Army, who told them to stay away.

Spoiler alert: They didn't stay away and it didn't end well for thirty-nine of them — and if they were petty enough, the Army could've issued the survivors a "so, what did we learn?"

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The 13 funniest military memes for the week of December 14th

A new study was recently released by the VA that monitored the effects of drinking alcohol heavily on a daily basis. In case you weren't yet aware, regularly binge drinking is bad for you.

So, instead of joining in with the rest of society and bashing the VA for studying the painfully obvious, I'm actually going to take their side. Tracking. Sure, it's still a gigantic waste of time and money, but it's clever as f*ck if you think about it. Imagine being a doctor on that study. You've got nothing to do for a few months but drink free booze, you're still getting paid a doctor's salary, and the answer is clear as day well before you're done? F*ck yeah! Sign my ass up!

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Why making a cup of tea in a British Tank isn't all that silly

Perhaps even more so than the queen, dry humor, and flavorless foods, Brits love their tea. There's nothing more stereotypically British than tea. That's why it's absolutely hilarious to the rest of the military world that British tanks come standard with a device that can make tea.

That's right. British tanks come equipped with a "boiling vessel" that, as you can imagine, is commonly used to brew up a cup of tea during the tankers' downtime. But there's more to this device than you might think. Yes, it's there so tankers can fit teatime into their war schedule, but the boiling vessel can also used for a plethora of other things.

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History

How our modern body armor was created by an irate pizza guy

Necessity is the mother of invention. If a certain need exists and the thing that satisfies such a need does not, then some endeavoring soul is bound to create it. Richard Davis embodied this mentality when he took some Kevlar and fashioned it into a lightweight vest — and his revolutionary design changed war fighting forever. With just a few slight modifications, Davis' design became the body armor that police officers and troops wear into combat today.

You might be wondering why Davis, a pizza guy from Detroit, would need such a thing. Well, what would you do if you were tired of getting shot at while delivering pies?

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NEWS

Why moving Fort Campbell's Gander Memorial Park is for the best

On this day in 1985, two-hundred and forty-eight Screaming Eagles and eight crew members were on their way home for Christmas after a six-month peacekeeping mission on the Sinai Peninsula. Their plane stalled due to iced wings and crashed less than a mile from the runway at Gander, Newfoundland, Canada. There were no survivors.

This horrific plane crash resulted in single largest loss of life the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) has ever endured and December 12th has since been a solemn day at Fort Campbell. The citizens of Gander donated a sugar maple tree for each life lost, planting a total of 256 trees in Kentucky in their honor. The trees stand in formation, each before a plaque bearing the name of a fallen soldier. For more than thirty years, this memorial has remained in the median separating Airborne Road.

After much consideration and with an extremely heavy heart, it was decided that the memorial needed to be moved to the nearby Brig. Gen. Don F. Pratt Memorial Museum.

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Entertainment

How Godzilla films were actually a metaphor for how postwar Japan saw the world

The new trailer for Godzilla: King of Monsters came out and, like other Godzilla movies of the last twenty years, it has one fundamental mistake: it has nothing to do with the extensive lore behind Godzilla and the large cast of supporting (and opposing) monsters.

On one hand, that's exciting. A fresh take on giant monster fights might be exactly what the Godzilla series needs — and we're sure it'll be worth the popcorn money. But on the other hand, it's a shame that the newer Godzilla films have all moved away from their original, more nuanced meanings.

If you go back and rewatch the original films by Ishiro Honda, in addition to a skyscraper-sized brawl, you'll get a snapshot of Japan's post-war foreign relations — if you can properly assemble the metaphors.

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