MILITARY CULTURE
Military Spouse Team

The top 10 perks of being an Army wife

Deployments, moving, nights in the field, hardship tours – there are lots of reasons to hate the Army. No one promised that Army life would be easy, in fact, everyone said it would be hard. But if it were all bad, if there were no perks, so many of us wouldn't have opted to stay in for 'life' – if by 'life' we mean about 20 years.

In fact, for some of us now nearing that magical 20-year mark, a future spent as something other than an Army spouse is actually kind of scary.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Guest Author

4 reasons spouses don't want to join Milspouse clubs

I have a confession to make. I'm not a member of the Spouses' Club, nor will I likely ever be.

While spouse clubs can certainly be wonderful sources of connection and involvement, the constant push to increase membership, extreme volunteerism, and the "social overwhelm" that tend to accompany a spouse club isn't a fit for everyone.

However, trying to tactfully explain why my default response of, "Thanks, but no thanks," is usually met with thin smiles and barely concealed cold stares. So here's the blunt truth.

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Migrant children in the US might be moved to military bases

The Trump administration is considering housing up to 20,000 unaccompanied migrant children on military bases in coming months, according to lawmakers and a Defense Department memo obtained by The Washington Post.

In a notification to lawmakers, the Pentagon said that officials at the Department of Health and Human Services asked whether beds could be provided for children at military installations "for occupancy as early as July through Dec. 31, 2018."

Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) addressed the issue on the Senate floor on June 21, 2018.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Tyler Medina

3 gifts you get from having military parents

Who knew that folding clothes the "navy way" and putting on sheets so tight that you could bounce a quarter off of them would have such a profound affect on my life.

I grew up in Virginia Beach, where most students came from military families and knew what it was like to have military parents. They knew the struggle of parents who had to leave for months at a time, the amount of discipline that was applied to daily chores and homework, and of course the expectation to succeed at anything you do.

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Lists
Amanda-lee Pitzer

5 things you should never say to a milspouse

1. When does he leave?

Please, please, please. Don't ask this question. We are trying very hard to live in la la land. Right now that date is spoiling everything and haunting our every thought. Do you go to buy milk at the grocery store and cry when you happen to see THAT date on it? No? We do. We know you mean well, but instead of reminding us of impending doom….distract us. Oh, and don't ask when he's coming home either.

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Military Life
Kristi Adams

What you learn while living in hotel during a 6 month PCS

When we received PCS orders to the Washington D.C. area, our plans certainly did not include living in a hotel for six months with an escape artist cat.

In our minds, we would be in temporary lodging for a few weeks while we closed on a new house. With a July move, we fully expected to have household goods delivered by August and be celebrating the holidays in our new home.

My husband and I had firmly decided we wanted to buy a house in the area. He was a cyber operations specialist and I had just separated active duty myself, and still maintained a current security clearance. Between a heady mix of defense contractor jobs available for me and the likelihood of an extended military assignment for him, we knew buying would be a smart move.

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transition

The 4 biggest new expenses you face when leaving the service

Leaving military life is a challenging transition for anyone, whether your service member is getting out after four years or retiring from the military after twenty years of service.

Even the most prepared may have a difficult time moving on to the civilian world when they decide leaving the military is right.

One of the biggest issues of transitioning out of the military is finances.

Ideally, military families should begin saving for life after the military long before their service member separates; but unfortunately, that isn't always possible.

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NEWS
Janine Boldrin

Military spouses demand an end to the 'Widow's Tax'

Imagine the worst happens. The person you have loved, your service member spouse, dies. Maybe you have been married for ten years. Or maybe you have been married for fifty years. But you navigated the craziness of military life together only to be told you need to forfeit your Survivor Benefit Plan, the money meant to help you survive this time. This was a part of your deceased service member's well-planned safety net for you, and the government has yanked it away at your most fragile moment.

It's called the Widow's Tax. But it's not a tax.

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NEWS
MJ Boice

This military spouse just won a California primary

It isn't every day we see headlines like this, but today is a proud day for the military spouse community. Why? Because it's OFFICIAL: Air Force spouse Tatiana Matta prevailed in the primary election for California's 23rd Congressional district; winning the chance to face U.S. Congressman Kevin McCarthy in the November 2018 general election.

For military spouses like you and I, it's not uncommon for us to get down on ourselves when we encounter roadblocks in our careers or goals. That's why Tatiana's primary win in this election for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives is such a big deal. She is tangible proof that hard work, tenacity, grit, dedication and a passion to serve others – (trademarks in the military spouse world) – can, indeed, make a significant impact…ESPECIALLY when we acknowledge those who help move us forward to greatness (i.e. our tribe, our clan, our people… our surrogate family).

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