4 of the worst things about being a platoon medic

Being a platoon medic is one of the toughest and most rewarding jobs in the military. You are expected to go above and beyond to render care to the sick and wounded troops — under some insane environmental conditions.

Through selfless sacrifices, platoon medics create a special, lifelong bond with the brave infantryman they have the pleasure of serving alongside. Being called "Doc" by the men that trust you with their lives is an absolute privilege, but it isn't without its drawbacks. Although the occupation has tons of upsides, these 4 downsides are tough to swallow.

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History

This is why the term 'cup of Joe' came from disgruntled sailors

Coffee is, without question, one of the most popular drinks in the entire world. Service members around the globe wake up every morning to enjoy a tasty cup of the brewed beverage and drink it throughout the day to get a critical mid-day boost.

It's reported that coffee was discovered centuries ago on the Ethiopian plateau — which covers the majority of the country and the Horn of Africa — by a goat herder named Kaldi. After his goats ate the beans from a nearby tree, they had crazy energy that kept them from falling sleep. Humans gave it a shot and, unsurprisingly, felt the same things.

Since then, the bean has been sold throughout the world. People of all ages consume countless gallons of the special drink we commonly refer to as a "cup of Joe." But have you ever wondered where that nickname came from?

Turns out, it was used long ago as a way to talk sh*t about a man who changed Naval history forever.

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5 of the best tips to get you back into shape after serving

Serving in the military requires us to be in top physical shape so we spend long hours carrying heavy equipment and kicking down the bad guy's door. Being physically fit ensures that we can take the fight to the enemy and outlast them in any combat situation. It's one of our strongest battlefield advantages.

Unfortunately, when we transition out the service, many of us trade out those brutal workouts in favor of spending more time relaxing on the couch. Those six-pack abs we used to sport at the beach have now gone AWOL. In fact,

"Veterans have a 70-percent higher chance of developing obesity than the general public," Army veteran and fitness expert Jennifer Campbell says.

One reason for this statistic is the dramatic change in a veteran's daily routine once they're out of service. Where once a troop was expected to gear up and get out there for PT every morning, there's no such demand on a veteran. This huge shift away from daily activity makes an equally huge impact on a veteran's body. And, after reaching a certain point of inactivity, a lot of veterans just give up on their physique. Unfortunately, we're not taught how to properly step back into the routine and achieve that lean look you had while serving.

Let's fix that. Here are a few simple few steps that will ease you back into maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

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Here's the origin of the respected battlefield cross

Troops die in battle — it's an unfortunate fact, but it's the nature of the job. Countless men and women have sacrificed themselves to protect their fellow service members, their friends and family back home, and the lifestyle we enjoy here in the U.S.

"Battlefield crosses" were created to honor the fallen. A deceased troop's rifle is planted, barrel-first, into their boots (or, in some cases, the ground) and their helmet is placed atop the rifle. Like all things military, this cross is part of a long-standing tradition — a tradition that has evolved since its first use on the battlefields of the American Civil War.

Despite the fact that it's called a cross, there's no single religious ideology attached to the practice.

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History

Here's the gear an average soldier carried in the Civil War

In the chaotic days of the American Civil War, troops from both the sides used to storm the battlefield and go head-to-head in a ruthless campaign to destroy the opposition — an opposition filled with those they once called fellow countrymen. The multi-year war was the deadliest to ever take place on American soil. Approximately 620,000 people were killed during the war, leaving several Southern states in ruin.

To fight a ground war, troops need supplies. But back in the mid-19th century, the way we outfitted our troops was very different from today. Budgets and technologies were limited.

Outside of itchy and hot uniforms, the gear each man carried was very similar on both sides.

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Military Life

3 reasons why yelling cadences will get you through a tough workout

Service members spends countless hours stomping across the base, running in formation while yelling a repetitive song at the top of their lungs.

Military cadences, or close-order drills, date back hundreds of years as a way to keep troops aligned as they march onto the battlefield. Today, it's primarily used to keep service members in step as they run, landing their feet at the same time to create a motivating, captivating rhythm.

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Lists

5 ways your service animal is trying to talk to you

Over the last several years, we've seen a significant increase in the number of veterans looking to service and therapy animals to aid them through daily life. These faithful companions help vets navigate through various environments, provide crucial emotional support, and retrieve beers from the fridge (we wish).

Now, before anything else, let's answer the important question: Yes, you can still pet these animals as long as the owner gives you permission.

Since our little buddies have thoughts and emotions just like us, they need to find a way to relay information. After a while, humans pick up on the little personality quirks that our furry friends put out there, like tapping the water bowl with a paw when they're thirty or standing next to the door when it's time to pee.

These tiny messages are easy to pick up if you're paying attention, but some other messages are so subtle that you need to be a dog whisperer to understand. So, to help you out, we've compiled a brief list of those important messages.

You're welcome, doggos.

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International

Why Royal Marines don't wear undies to bed will make you think twice

In America, when you go without wearing any underwear, we jokingly call it "going commando." If you've ever deployed to a joint military base and you've worked alongside Royal Marines, then you understand the term better than most — you've probably received an uncalled-for eyeful when these troops wake up for the work day. That's because they tend to sleep in just their birthday suits.

But it's not for comfort's sake — it's hygienically sound.

It's no secret that, when the mission calls for it, military personnel sometimes have to live in tight berthing areas. Because of this close-quarter living, illnesses and bacteria can quickly spread from person to person.

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This is the 'stress hormone' that's making you gain weight

Testosterone, estrogen, and leptin are just a few of the hormones that our bodies naturally produce. These hormones allow us to grow muscle, regulate our reproductive systems, and boost our metabolisms so we can lose weight. However, the stress generated by deployment cycles and our hectic schedules causes the human body to also produce a complex stress hormone, called cortisol.

This vital hormone is created by the adrenal glands, which are located just above your kidneys.

Cortisol dictates how your body manages the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins that you intake during meals. It lowers the amount of inflammation in your body and is one of the contributing factors to the sympathetic nervous system's "fight or flight" response.

Experiencing chronic stress makes for increased levels of this powerful hormone. Having too much cortisol results in mood swings, "brain fog," interrupted sleep patterns, and increased visceral fat (fat stored within the abdominal cavity).

But don't worry — getting rid of those extra layers on your tummy doesn't have to be difficult.

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