Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY MOVIES
Luke Ryan

‘The Mandalorian’: An honest-to-god old western

Author's note: If you haven't seen "The Mandalorian" yet, go watch it and come back — spoilers ahead. For the rest of you: this is the way.

The internet has been buzzing about "The Mandalorian," the "Star Wars" series that follows a Mandalorian bounty hunter (of the same tribe and iconic armor as Boba Fett) who finds a young, force-sensitive creature who looks like a baby Yoda. The series hasn't just produced a slew of new memes, it's crushed the ratings on several platforms — IMDB has it at an 8.9, and Rotten Tomatoes rates it at 94 percent on the Tomatometer (with an audience score of 93 percent).


It has all the familiar, nostalgic elements of "Star Wars" — spectacular scenes in space, fun action-adventure, weird creatures, the conflict of good and evil, and, of course, the force. However, "The Mandalorian" also includes a host of cowboy movie tropes, which adds a freshness to the story. It's not like any old Western we've seen — after all, it's set in space with little alien wizards. It's also not a repeat of other "Star Wars" stories because it's basically an old Western set in a fantasy universe.

We can't publish an article on "The Mandalorian" without showing "the child" at least once.

(Photo courtesy of Disney+)

In order to understand old Western films, we need to understand where they came from. Many of the old Western tropes are American, but some are borrowed from older Japanese cinema. The obvious connection is the Japanese classic "Seven Samurai" being remade into the American cowboy classic "The Magnificent Seven." While this is the most famous connection between the two genres, it's not the only one. The music, the stories, the filmmaking techniques — watch any film by Akira Kurosawa and you'll see elements of the Western left and right.

"The Mandalorian" borrows from both.

It makes sense to begin with the Mandalorian's religion — his weapons. Our protagonist carries around his handheld blaster and a disintegration rifle (known as a modified Amban Rifle). These are clearly the equivalent of a revolver and a rifle, the cowboy's typical loadout in most Westerns. Mando generally draws and fires his blaster from the hip, just like the classic Wild West draw. Any bigger weapons brought onto the battlefield are typically large, mounted weapons — the equivalent of the evil antagonist breaking out a Gatling gun mounted to a train or on a tripod. The lasso is another quintessential tool for the cowboy of old Westerns — depicted in "The Mandalorian" by his grappling line. Mando wraps a few enemies up in his "lasso" throughout the story, hog-tying his targets.

Several specific moments also call directly back to the films of the Wild West. For example, the classic "horse whisperer" scene where Mando tames and breaks a blurrg. He is bucked and thrown as the wise, old man watches from the edge of the corral. Finally, our hero mounts the beast and they ride into a few sunsets together.

We mentioned that the Japanese film "Seven Samurai" was the direct inspiration for "The Magnificent Seven" — both films feature bandits who are hell bent on raiding a village, forcing the townspeople to enlist the help of some elite warriors to train them and defend them against the next onslaught. Sound familiar? This same story played out in a chapter of "The Mandalorian" with some unique, sci-fi twists — we don't remember an AT-ST in "Seven Samurai."

The comparisons are obvious.

(Photo courtesy of Disney+.)

On top of congruent storylines, one of the most significant ways that Japanese cinema inspired old Westerns was with its music; "Star Wars" also features some of the most iconic music in film history. Ludwig Goransson's score of "The Mandalorian" fuses the two by combining elements from old Westerns (and perhaps old Japanese films) like the heavy beating of drums with "primitive" sounding percussion, bizarre flutes, and interesting stringed instruments. The hollow melody of the main title would be just as at home if it was played over a lone gunslinger in the Wild West, riding off to save a small town from nefarious bandits. The score cloaks the Mandalorian himself in a shroud of mystery.

Start with some old Japanese film score elements, mix in a bit of Ennio Morricone, then top it off with heavy sprinkles of classic "Star Wars" sweeping scores — and you've got yourself a soundtrack fit for the halls of Mandalore.

"The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly" (left), and "The Mandalorian."

(Photos courtesy of United Artists and Disney+.)

The setting and wardrobe also highlight the connection of this magical, dystopian science-fiction narrative to the Wild West. Most of the events in "The Mandalorian" are set in barren places — not on the lavish planet of Naboo or the bustling cities of Coruscant, but out in the lawless desert where guns and criminals abound. And Pedro Pascal (the Mandalorian) sports a cape eerily similar to how Clint Eastwood wears his poncho in classics like "A Few Dollars More" and "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly." Instead of high-tech visors, many of the inhabitants of these barren locations wear old-school goggles, and they wear their blasters low on their hip just like the cowboys we know from the Old West. The Mandalorian even keeps rounds strung across his chest — one wouldn't expect the need for that in a science-fiction universe, but it all falls in line with the classic Western aesthetic.

A lot of old Westerns are films about rugged individualism. They follow rough characters who have to navigate their way through an even rougher world. The protagonist then finds at least one redeeming aspect about the unforgiving, desolate landscape on which they fight — something precious among the thorns. Upon that discovery, the cowboy or lawman or mercenary finds that their ability to fight, to be strong, to kill — it all suddenly has meaning — it suddenly turns into the ability to protect a village, a woman, a friend… or a child.

Jon Favreau has taken a beloved franchise and breathed new life into it by fusing it with these classic elements from old Western films, and it's been a wild success. Audiences around the world have expressed how thrilled they are at this new installment of "Star Wars," and I, for one, can't wait for the second season.

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.