Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY MOVIES
Brittany Ramjattan

Movies with the most realistic combat scenes, according to veterans

There's no shortage of media featuring the good, bad, and ugly aspects of life at war or in the military. In fact, as we come out of the biopic zeitgeist and set our sights toward the digital era, the number of films, television shows, movies, and other forms of content featuring these elements is only growing. But not all depictions of combat are created equal.

It's easier to make a film about war than it is to stay true to its source — so, which movies treat its combat with the most respect and realism? We asked some veterans, and here's what they had to say.


“Dunkirk”

While Christopher Nolan didn't take home the 2018 Oscar for this particular war blockbuster, "Dunkirk" has gained universal acclaim as one of the best World War II films to date. It tells the story of trapped British and French forces attempting to evacuate a war-torn beach in May 1940, while German forces closed in. The clean-shaven soldiers may not be a testament to the details, but "Dunkirk" thrives on its atmosphere and closed cinema, which is used to communicate the overall gravity of the battle.

"'Dunkirk' succeeds in recreating the plight of tending to your fellow soldier while being under constant threat of bombardment," said Tan Vega, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. With gritty visuals and stellar performances, the film uses tight angles and extreme close-ups to create and emanate panic, desperation, and fear to its audience. In moments of true cinema, we can examine the bonds forged between the troops, as well as the intense pressure they're under to survive.

“Saving Private Ryan”

With Empire Magazine lauding the Omaha Beach landing as "the best battle sequence of all time," this entry should come as no surprise. "Saving Private Ryan" uses its artistic license to enrich its characters and depict realistic events of war in a way that had never been done before. The movie focuses on the personal journey of a few soldiers venturing behind enemy lines to save fellow soldier Private James Ryan.

"The most realistic thing about 'Saving Private Ryan' is nothing is off the table," said Gay Dimars, a veteran of the Vietnam War. "The water's bloody, the soldiers are nauseous, and as an audience, we're there with them." However, Steven Spielberg did sacrifice historic authenticity in favor of dramatic effect — the film's climax is strewn with inaccuracies, but with top-notch performances depicting the effect of war and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the film solidifies its place among the best war movies ever made.

“Platoon”

"Platoon" is the first Hollywood film to be written and directed by a veteran of the Vietnam War. The script capitalizes on Oliver Stone's experiences in various combat units to expertly depict the severity of combat as well as the rippling effects of war. As such, the toughest critiques of the movie come from Stone's former platoonmates, some of whom say they felt too exposed after the film's release. "Platoon" was shot on location in the Philippines and utilizes long lenses, careful lighting, and talented actors to craft the atmosphere of the Vietnam War and inform the audience of the confusion, psychological trauma, and deep-seated violence Vietnam veterans endured.

“Black Hawk Down”

The film "Black Hawk Down" has faced criticism for wavering from the highly accurate book upon which it was based. "The combat is realistic, but many details miss the mark," said Sharm Ali, a U.S. Air Force veteran. "What it does really well is explain how a noble cause could go south really quickly."

"Black Hawk Down" tells the story of the Battle of Mogadishu, during which U.S. service members were sent to kill or capture Somalia's key warlord, Mohamed Farrah Aidid, in a broader effort to stabilize a country in the midst of a humanitarian crisis. However, Somali forces shot down their helicopters and effectively trapped them on the streets of the foreign country, forcing them to fight their way out. The film is most impressive in its depiction of the harsh realities of urban combat that soldiers were forced to endure during the Somali conflict, and was notable in that it lifted the curtain on the types of operations the shadowy Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) were conducting at the time.

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.