Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY MOVIES
Ethan E. Rocke

Watch: Navy filmmaker's 'Top Gun' inspired mini-documentary

When Matthew Callahan was first introduced to the movie Top Gun at 2 years old, the film became an instant favorite.

So when the award-winning video producer for the Navy's All Hands Magazine was tasked with producing a series of videos for Naval Air Station Oceana's Virtual Air Show last month, Callahan drew inspiration from director Tony Scott's Cold War classic.

"Top Gun was my first true love of cinema," Callahan told Coffee or Die Magazine. "It's a movie of its time — the late '80s, when they were just overdoing everything — but the way it's filmed is beautiful. I'll never forget that opening scene with footage at sunrise or sunset on the ship. You don't often see military personnel and equipment framed that way, where it's kind of treated like a total spectacle, and I try and capture that same feeling with a lot of my stuff because it cuts through a lot of noise."


Callahan was part of a three-man production team including All Hands video producer Jimmy Shea and Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Jorge. Together, they spent five days producing eight videos for NAS Oceana's virtual air show. Trying to convey the excitement and spectacle of an air show with a series of short videos is no easy task, but Callahan and his team worked hard to translate their own passion for viewers.

"We produced eight or nine video products in five days," Callahan said. "The tempo was pretty nonstop. It was exhausting but also amazing."

The standout production from the trip is a roughly three-minute video about NAS Oceana's Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106. The Virginia Beach-based training squadron prepares freshly minted F-18 aircrews for fleet service.

Callahan said for that video he supplemented the team's production from Virginia with footage provided by the Navy's advertising agency.

"I asked for cool, sexy carrier footage, and the ad agency really delivered," Callahan said. "It seems like Top Gun really set a kind of visual precedent for filming jets on an aircraft carrier, and I wanted to produce something fast but serious in a brass-tacks kind of way."

Callahan said that while he realizes most of his audience engages with his productions online or on mobile devices, he still tries to include some audio and visual treats for true cinephiles who might watch on a larger TV screen or with noise-canceling headphones.

"I'm always editing and creating soundscapes for that one person who might wanna watch these stories on a big display with a good sound system," he said. "It's almost never the case, with most folks engaging on mobile, but there's always gonna be someone who does. I hope that there's a payoff for those few who chose to watch that way."

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.