MIGHTY MOVIES

You know you're a vet when 'Catch-22' triggers you

One of my NCOs gave me a copy of Joseph Heller's satirical novel Catch-22 as a promotion gift when I became a captain.

It was an ironic gesture, given that he was probably the person I commiserated with the most about ridiculous military rules. Now, George Clooney has directed a six-episode adaptation of the book so you can relive the blood-boiling insanity of active duty all over again.


Watch the official 'Catch-22' trailer

The series centers on Christopher Abbott's Captain John Yossarian, a World War II bombardier going crazy trying to stay alive while his commanding officer, Colonel Cathcart (Kyle Chandler), tries to impress his superiors by continually increasing the number of missions his men must fly. Yossarian has already flown 50 and he wants out.

There's a rule which allows pilots who are crazy to be grounded, but because being driven crazy by fear is fundamentally rational, he's certified fit to fly. This is the titular catch-22 —and the reason everyone now knows the phrase.

In Heller's words, "[He] would be crazy to fly more missions and sane if he didn't, but if he was sane he had to fly them. If he flew them he was crazy and didn't have to; but if he didn't want to he was sane and had to."

The military's response to logic.

Based on the jokes in the trailer, it looks like the series will attempt to capture Heller's satirical commentary on the absurdity of war (especially when bureaucracies are involved) — and Heller wrote Catch-22 before the United States even became completely entrenched in asymmetrical war-fighting!

Any veteran, especially one who has served in combat or during wartime, can attest to the fact that military decision-making is often based on antiquated laws, procedures, and mindsets. While the United States has continued to maintain global military superiority thus far, we're certainly not achieving our prime objectives so much as holding a defensive line — and we're definitely not taking care of our service members the way we should (especially for the amount of money allotted in the defense budget).

Been there, buddy.

I have a feeling the series will capture what it feels like to serve in a system that expects its troops to "shut up and color," rather than fostering innovation, mental health, and, oh I don't know, watering the grass with water instead of blood blood blood?

The TV adaptation debuts on Hulu on May 17, 2019, and also stars Kyle Chandler, Hugh Laurie, Giancarlo Giannini, and Daniel David Stewart.