MIGHTY MOVIES
Jason Guerrasio

6 biggest twists from 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' explained

(Sony Pictures)

Warning: Major spoilers below. Do not read if you haven't seen "Spider-Man: Far From Home."

Director Jon Watts calls "Spider-Man: Far From Home" a "con movie," and if you've seen it already, you know exactly why. The movie uses the audience's collective knowledge of the Marvel Cinematic Universe to present a story that completely messes with their heads.

From the real motives of the movie's villain, Quentin Beck (aka, Mysterio; played by Jake Gyllenhaal), to the surprise cameos, "Far From Home" is a rapid-fire series of twists, all the way to the post-credit scene.

And Watts said that sleight-of-hand feel was ingrained in the project from the development phase — which began just weeks after "Spider-Man: Homecoming" opened in theaters in 2017 — because of the movie's villain.


"It was such a core concept because it's Mysterio's whole philosophy," Watts told INSIDER. "When you're dealing with a character who works in illusions and deception, that's going to be one of the major themes."

So Watts beefed up on his con movies, specifically spending a lot of time studying "The Sting" and "The Usual Suspects," and embarked on telling a unique Marvel movie, one where almost everything is not what it seems.

Below, Watts gave INSIDER insight on 6 of the biggest spoilers in "Far From Home," including stuff you may not catch until you see the movie again.

1. The moment Watts knew the bar scene, in which Peter Parker hands over the E.D.I.T.H. glasses to Mysterio, would work.

(Jay Maidment/Sony Pictures)

Halfway through the movie — after Spider-Man (Tom Holland) and Mysterio defeat one of the Elementals — the two have a celebratory drink at a bar. The scene gradually becomes a dramatic moment in which Peter Parker questions if he has what it takes to be a superhero like his idol, Iron Man. He even doubts if he's worthy to have the high-tech E.D.I.T.H. glasses that Tony Stark had Nick Fury give him earlier in the movie. By the end of the scene, Parker hands Mysterio the glasses, which have an AI embedded in them that can power all of Stark Industries' weapons.

But once Parker walks out of the bar, it's revealed that Mysterio played a huge trick on him. The bar was actually an illusion. Many of the patrons were working for Mysterio and the decor was all artificially projected by clones (they were actually sitting in an abandoned storefront). It was all a con job to get the glasses from Parker so Mysterio could have control of Stark's high-tech weapons. Even the Elementals Spidey was battling was an illusion put together by Mysterio.

The ambitious scene was one Watts knew had to hit perfectly with the audience if the movie was going to work.

"The movie hinges on that scene," Watts said. "It's a culmination of Mysterio's con. I anticipate that a lot of people will know that Mysterio is the villain, they aren't just exactly sure how or why."

Watts said there were not multiple versions of the scene shot. What you see in the movie is how the scene was scripted. And though he spent months with the screenwriters getting the scene to feel right, he wasn't convinced it would work until Holland and Gyllenhaal got their hands on it.

"What's great about working with actors like Tom and Jake is that they bring it to life," he said. "They have to make sure that none of it feels false. I remember the first time we ran it, we tweaked a couple of lines but as soon as they started going through it between the two of them, it was a huge relief for me. It was one of those moments where you have talked about it a lot and prepared so much, but it has to come to life with the actors or the whole movie feels false."

2. The bar scene is also filled with hidden messages to influence Peter Parker to give up the glasses.

(Sony Pictures)

The whole trick with the bar scene is Mysterio has to get the glasses without ever asking for them. Peter has to be the one who hands them over. Watts said to drive that home, along with watching how classic con movies from the past have done it, he also studied how deception is done on people in real life. And his major takeaway was visual persuasion.

"You may not have caught this, but all the things on the wall behind Quentin [in the bar scene] are things that feed into the idea that Peter would hand the glasses over to him," Watts said. "So even the art direction is part of the con. There's military medals, that sort of helps remind Peter what Quentin said about being a hero soldier. There's a picture of glasses, again, embedding that idea. So there are all these things in the background of the bar in Peter's eye line that will subconsciously motivate him to hand these glasses over."

Did you catch any of those visuals? Keep an eye out for them in the bar scene next time you see the movie.

3. The origin of “The Blip” term.

(Sony Pictures)

One of the funniest moments in the opening of the movie is the reveal of the term "The Blip," which refers to people who were affected by Thanos' snap that happened in "Avengers: Infinity War" and then came back after the events in "Avengers: Endgame."

Watts said it was something that they came up with while writing the movie.

"We had our own logic," he said. "'The Snap' was what made everyone disappear, but for everyone who came back it was like no time had passed. So we felt, 'It's just like a blip to them.' That's just how we started talking about the passage of time. And we also felt it was just a funny phrase to refer to this devastating event."

And thanks to the term, a running joke came out of it.

Though The Blip felt like just moments for people affected, they were actually gone for five years. So they came back five years older. It does wonders for one of Peter Parker's high-school classmates, Brad (Remy Hii). Pre-blip he was a short geek, but in those five years, he hit puberty and post-blip he's a hunky stud clashing with Parker for MJ's (Zendaya) affection.

4. Quentin Beck is behind some of the most memorable Stark Industries tech, but never got the credit.

(Marvel)

Another great thing about the bar scene is that it gives us Mysterio's backstory. And it's steeped in MCU lore.

It turns out he's the one who created B.A.R.F., the binary augmented retro-framing tech Stark shows off in the beginning of "Captain America: Civil War" — though it was Stark who came up with the silly name (and took the credit).

Mysterio's past in the movie is a little different than his origin in the comics. In the pages of "The Amazing Spider-Man," Quentin Beck is a special-effects wiz and stunt man who turns to crime when his dreams of making it big in Hollywood fizzle out. But for the movie, Watts realized that Beck would fit perfectly in the MCU if he made him a bitter former employee at Stark Industries.

"The idea around that was we knew Quentin would have a relationship with Tony," he said. "The illusion tech that Quentin uses, we've actually seen it in the Marvel universe from the beginning. Tony has always dealt with holographic tech, but it's never been said who made it. And then it really comes to the fore in 'Civil War.' But Tony didn't make it. He doesn't build all the Stark tech on his own, there's a whole organization that does it. So we thought that would be how Mysterio pulls this all off. Once that clicked, then we just decided he would have a team of disgruntled Stark Industries employees. We used that B.A.R.F. flashback as a jumping-off point."

5. The return of J. Jonah Jameson.

(Columbia Pictures)

The mid-credit scene in "Far From Home" is a fun moment for those who were fans of the Sam Raimi movies, as the beloved character J. Jonah Jameson makes a cameo. And like those movies from the early aughts, actor J.K. Simmons returned to play the role.

In the scene, Jameson is not the loud-mouthed editor of the Daily Bugle, but a loud-mouthed host of an Alex Jones-like TV show. In the middle of Manhattan, Jameson appears on a billboard and shows shocking footage of Mysterio, just before his death (which he doctored to make it look like Spider-Man killed him), revealing the true identity of Spider-Man: Peter Parker.

"It made so much sense in the context of the story we were telling," Watts said of bringing back Jameson. "We knew we wanted Mysterio to be the one who revealed Peter's identity and it had to be on the news, so we felt if it's on the news it has to be the Daily Bugle, and if it's going to be the Daily Bugle, it has to be J.K. Simmons. There was never any question about. And if he didn't do it, we weren't going to do it. We would have come up with something else."

But why make Jameson a TV personality? Watts said putting him on TV instead of overseeing a newspaper was just commenting on the times we live in today.

"He's still doing a very similar character to what he was doing in the Sam Raimi movies, but now there's just a real-world comparison that there wasn't before," he said. "It's less that he has changed and more that the world has changed."

6. Nick Fury and Maria Hill were really Skrulls.

(Disney)

"You didn't see that one coming, right?" Watts asked with a laugh.

We certainly did not. In the scene that immediately follows the end credits, we are given the movie's biggest con: Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and fellow S.H.I.E.L.D. member Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders) were really Skrulls the entire movie. Yes, Skrulls, those shape-shifting beings we were introduced to in "Captain Marvel."

It turns out Talos (Ben Mendelsohn) and one of his compatriots came to Earth with instructions from Fury (who we learn is lounging out in space on a big ship) to hand deliver the E.D.I.T.H. glasses to Peter Parker. Clearly things got a little complicated. But it is a fun coda for a movie that completely messes with the audience.

"Once you get into the vocabulary of a con man movie like this, I feel you have more leeway to just keep doing reversals like that," Watts said. "Everyone is lying. Everyone is hiding something. No one is who they seem. It just made sense that at the end of it we would do this. As we were developing the story, there was always a lingering question of, 'But, how could anyone fool Nick Fury? His super power is being skeptical.' But we knew he needed to be fooled in order to make the story work. So as soon as I saw 'Captain Marvel' it became obvious how we do it."

Watts added: "When you watch the movie again with this knowledge about the Skrulls there are some fun things you will catch, especially Fury's dialogue."

This article originally appeared on Insider. Follow @thisisinsider on Twitter.