MIGHTY MOVIES
Cameron LeBlanc

Those $200 lightsabers at Disneyland might actually be worth it

(Disney Parks)

The Disneyland iteration of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge is finally open. Early reviews — from those who were able to navigate a less-than-stellar ticket reservation system — are positive. An especially bright spot: the souvenir lightsabers available exclusively at the park.

As we've reported before, the lightsabers are customizable — guests choose their components and assemble their saber themselves — and pricey. The total price with tax comes to $215.49, exactly $215.49 more than a souvenir coaster from Olga's Cantina. Still, the sabers themselves and the experience of designing your own are getting rave reviews from the lucky fans who've already had the chance to get theirs.


The Los Angeles Times has a good rundown of what the experience is like, and it seems that, in true Disney fashion, narrative is front and center. The story created around Savi's Workshop, the exclusive home of the customizable lightsaber, is that it has to masquerade as a simple scrap metal shop.

Light-up blades come in red, blue, green, and Mace Windu purple.

(Disney Parks)

The employees who work there play along, reminding visitors who say the l-word that they don't want any trouble from the First Order.

They will help you pick out the pieces of "salvaged" scrap metal you'll need to build your lightsaber, with drawers full of hilts of four different themes. Pick your hilt and you'll get a corresponding pin when you set up an appointment to build your saber as part of a group with 13 other "Builders."

After some practice assembling lightsabers outside — which may be interrupted if Stormtroopers happen to walk by — you're ushered inside to a room dominated by a large table. You'll hear a spiel about Jedi history and the power of the Force before guiding you through the process of choosing the remaining parts and assembling your lightsaber.

Once assembled, everyone inserts their assembled blade into a pod for a final ceremony that ends with everyone igniting their lightsabers.

Whether or not that experience and the saber itself are worth the steep cost depends on your budget and how much time you're willing to spend at Savi's (line are, predictably, quite long). But if your trip won't feel complete without bringing a lightsaber home, it looks like Disney has created an attraction that goes beyond a simple gift shop to create an immersive, narrative experience.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.