Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY GAMING

6 of the biggest blue falcons in gaming

The video game community is filled with the same amount of douchebags as regular society. The majority of gamers hop online, as they have for years, to enjoy spending some time playing their favorite title — then, some as*hole comes in and ruins it all in a blink of an eye.

It's an inevitability. There's always that one dick who ruins the fun for everyone else just because they can. In gaming, they're generally referred to as "trolls," but in the military, we call them "Blue Falcons" — or buddy f*ckers. Even the most kindhearted, polite person might unleash their inner as*hole when they're safely behind the anonymity of their video game avatar.

At the end of the day, when these online Blue Falcons do their dirty work, no one really gets hurt — it's still just a game and players usually just respawn somewhere else (or log off for a while). That being said, the level of time, effort, and dedication these guys put into f*cking with some random players is beyond astounding.

"How do you kill that which has no life?"(South Park Studios)


6. Snipers

We're not referring to the guys who pick up a rifle and camp in one spot for (seemingly) hours just to score a kill (we'll get to that in a minute). Instead, we're talking about the people who go out of their way in the "real life world" to hunt down someone's virtual character — just to kill them or harass them.

This type of Blue Falcon became much more popular with the rise of game streaming. Now, some people take it as a point of pride to track down whatever high-profile streamer is on air and kill them — even if it's against the rules. But your average stream sniper doesn't even come close to that one time a father hired virtual assassins to hunt and kill his son's characters in hopes that it'd make him give up video games.

But seriously though, if you're interested getting your kids to stop playing video games - there's definitely a market for that.

(Bluehole Studios Inc.)

5. Team killers

Online games assume that once you're randomly placed onto either the blue or red team, you'll be loyal to the other players out of a mutual desire to win. Not all games have friendly-fire turned off, so it's important to watch your aim.

It sucks when someone on your team accidentally shoots you — but it's infuriating when they do it on purpose... and it's in the spawn zone. Now, the other players on your team have to either kill that douche or let them continue trolling. Either way, the other team won't mind.

I just blame it on a terrible grenade throw.

(Ubisoft)

4. Campers

Games often provide a wide-open world for players to enjoy themselves in. In fact, some games are so massive that they're comparable to actual states in America. They've got all that room to play in and yet some assholes still feel the desire to hole up somewhere — to set up camp and sit with a shotgun, just waiting for you to round the corner.

"Camping," as it's called, is most egregious when you're the last player alive on your team. Not only does the enemy need to search every single corner, but your teammates are often stuck waiting for a chance to respawn, too. Some game developers will put in a system that punishes "camping" after a while, but that won't stop the dedicated.

And yet camping is a legitimate strategy in real life.

(Bungie)

3. Scammers

Remember when the internet was first introduced and everyone was extremely wary of online creeps and scammers? Well, apparently, all of that is thrown out the window when it comes to video games.

"Scammers" in online games take many forms, from people trying to sell you junk for gold to those who run extremely complex banking schemes in games like EVE Online. That's right — in CCP Games' space-based MMO, players would loan out virtual money to other players, manage a massive system where players have, essentially, created an investment bank, and then make off with trillions of Isk, the in-game currency.

After a certain point in EVE, if you want to get insanely rich, you need to get nefarious.

(CCP Games)

2. Players who bring disaster into low-level areas

In most online games, threats are appropriate to their area. If you want to fight a dangerous baddie, you'll have to do it over there, near those other dangerous baddies. Some clever players, however, have figured out how to drag extremely tough bosses or (or virtual plagues) into major player hubs.

In the early days of World of Warcraft, players could bring a massive demon, Lord Kazzak, directly into Stormwind City, where he would proceed to evaporate players with barely any effort.

To make matters worse, Lord Kazzak would heal himself with each player he killed...

(Blizzard Entertainment)

1. Event Crashers

On rare occasions, players band together and decide to not fight each other — usually for a good reason. Then, one person comes in and breaks the armistice when they see a good chance to kill everyone. The most famous example of this was in World of Warcraft. When a well-respected player passed away in real life, players gathered for a virtual funeral. Then, players of the opposing faction learned that they were holding it in a neutral area and without weapons and, well... you guessed it.

But this doesn't just happen in MMOs. Recently, a Fortnite player named Elemental_Ray took advantage of an in-game event to rack up a massive kill count. Players gathered on an easily-destroyed ramp to get a good view of an in-game rocket launch. When this Blue Falcon destroyed the bottom of the ramp, it all came crashing down — firmly placing Elemental_Ray at the top of Fortnite's all-time leaderboard for number of kills in single match: 48.