What Russia's deadliest nuclear sub could do to the US

Russia has two classes of nuclear submarines that could absolutely annihilate American military installations and cities if even a single one of the submarines attacked us at home. So, what would happen if these submarines attacked, and what keeps them from doing so?

In the inky black water, a predator slowly rises from the depths of the Gulf of Mexico like an Old God or Godzilla, but even more devastating and lethal: The Russian submarine Yuri Dolgoruky with 16 nuclear-tipped Bulava cruise missiles on board. When it begins ripple-firing its missiles, it could send 96 warheads into American cities and military installations.

It's a real submarine that's in service right now, and it could annihilate American cities in a surprise attack.

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GEAR & TECH

What it's like to be strapped into the U-2 Dragon Lady

The Air Force needs more pilots for its highest flying spy plane, the U-2 Dragon Lady. The plane has flown for over 60 years, but keeps beating retirement predictions because of its low costs, high mission readiness, and ability to quickly deploy to international emergencies.

The Air Force needs new spy pilots, especially for the Cold War-era U-2 Dragon Lady that has flown since 1955, but piloting the U-2 is different from nearly any other aircraft in the world right now. Pilots are strapped into the plane by a dedicated crew and then fly at the edge of space, capturing photographs and signals intelligence.

Here are 13 photos that show what that's like:

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History

How our modern body armor was created by an irate pizza guy

Necessity is the mother of invention. If a certain need exists and the thing that satisfies such a need does not, then some endeavoring soul is bound to create it. Richard Davis embodied this mentality when he took some Kevlar and fashioned it into a lightweight vest — and his revolutionary design changed war fighting forever. With just a few slight modifications, Davis' design became the body armor that police officers and troops wear into combat today.

You might be wondering why Davis, a pizza guy from Detroit, would need such a thing. Well, what would you do if you were tired of getting shot at while delivering pies?

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History

That time an F-14 killed three MiGs with a single missile

A lot of crazy sh*t happened in the Iran-Iraq War. The backbone of the Iranian Air Force at the time was the beloved F-14 Tomcat, a plane the Iranians still fly. Purchased by the Shah of Iran before the rise of the Islamic Republic, Iran's Air Force consisted of dozens of the two-seat fighter aircraft, which gave them an edge in the air war against neighboring Iraq.

But tech can only take you so far. And it was the skills of Iranian pilots that allowed the IRIAF to claim three kills with one missile.

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Why the Army Futures Command is a great step forward for science

A new innovation for the United States Military means an innovation for the entire world. Something as simple as the creation of the GPS, which started as a DoD project in the 70s, quickly became one of the most useful quality-of-life tools used in today's society — and this isn't the first (or last) time military tech landed in the hands of civilians.

A large portion of the government's tech eventually trickles down to the people. Recently, the Army established an entire command unit dedicated to research and development, called the Army Futures Command (AFC). Everything about this newly-formed group of soldier-scientists seems like it can only mean great things for moving science — and society at large — forward.

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GEAR & TECH

Russia hasn't shown its laser weapon fire a single time

The internet is in a tizzy over Russia's new video of its hyped laser weapon, but we still haven't seen it fire. And these claims are coming from a regime known for over-hyping and under-delivering when it comes to advanced weaponry.

As Russian propaganda blows up the internet with the unveiling of a new laser weapon, this is just a friendly reminder of a couple things. First, Russia lies about new tech all the time. Second, it hasn't shown the weapon fire. And, most importantly, this weapon was originally announced in a press conference filled with other over-hyped weapons.

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History

That time an F-22 pilot told the Iranian Air Force to go home

I hope he has a Polaroid of it.

The opening few minutes of the movie Top Gun make for, arguably, one of the coolest aerial scenes ever caught on film. There's a reason it's the enduring air power movie of the 1980s. Too bad for the Air Force that Top Gun featured the Navy.

Except Air Force pilots do that sh*t in real life.

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GEAR & TECH

SciFi loves nuclear hand grenades, but you'll never get one

Nuclear hand grenades pop up in all sorts of science fiction, from Star Wars to Fallout, but you'll never throw one unless you can send a 50-pound kettlebell 350 yards.

Ever since America figured out nuclear bombs, science fiction writers have flirted with all the different ways that nuclear weapons could work. But while lots of SciFi weapons have come to fruition, like drones and pain rays, the nuclear hand grenade will always be a weapon of fiction.

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GEAR & TECH

Why everyone feels better with a SuperCobra overhead

The SeaCobra and SuperCobra are the Marine Corps' custom build of the Army's AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter. Their version includes added power and a new weapon and has enjoyed a number of upgrades in the decades since its first flight. It's still, despite being over 40 years old, the bird of prey that can cut through enemy forces and protect Marines on the ground.

It's an airframe that dates back to the Vietnam War, but it's served for nearly 50 years and is still a comforting presence for those protected by its missiles, guns, and rockets: Meet the AH-1 SuperCobra.

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