MIGHTY TACTICAL
Senior Airman Beaux Hebert

The Air Force put some guys in a freezer to test out new survival gear

US airmen assigned to the 354th Fighter Wing tested a new arctic survival kit for the F-35A Lightning II in downtown Fairbanks, Alaska, Nov. 5, 2019.

A team of airmen from the 356th Fighter Squadron, F-35 Program Integration Office, 354th Operation Support Squadron Aircrew Flight Equipment and 66th Training Squadron, Detachment 1, used a subzero chamber to replicate the extreme temperatures of interior Alaska.

The test was performed because the current arctic survival kit won't fit in the allotted space under the seat of an F-35A. The 354th FW is expecting to receive its first F-35A in April of 2019.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Morgan McFall-Johnsen

How the hunt for alien life is about to get real

NASA and other agencies are building a handful of telescopes to probe the universe's most puzzling mysteries.

From vantage points on Earth and in space, the upcoming telescopes will rely on next-generation technologies in their attempts to answer some of scientists' biggest questions about dark matter, the expansion of the universe, and alien life.

Some will provide 100 times more information than today's most powerful tools for observing the skies.

The first of these telescopes, NASA's highly anticipated James Webb Space Telescope, is slated to launch in 2021, then start scanning the atmospheres of distant worlds for clues about extraterrestrial life. As early as 2022, other new telescopes in space will take unprecedented observations of the skies, while observatories on Earth peer back into the ancient universe.

Here's what's in the pipeline and what these new tools could reveal.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Ben Mack

Check out United's new 'Star Wars'-themed Boeing 737 plane

Luke Skywalker may have claimed the Millennium Falcon was a "piece of junk" when he first saw it (even though it could, you know, make point-five past lightspeed) — but he probably wouldn't be saying that about United Airlines' shiny new Boeing 737-800.

To celebrate the December 2019 theatrical release of "The Rise of Skywalker," billed as the last film in the nine-film Skywalker saga, the airline has launched a special "Star Wars"-themed plane — and though it can't travel at lightspeed, it does look pretty spiffy, or at least nothing at all like the heavily modified ship of a certain scruffy-looking nerf herder (sorry, Han Solo).

The plane made its first flight earlier this month, from Houston to Orlando, Florida. Though there were plenty of evil First Order stormtroopers on hand, thankfully no one was taken away for questioning by Kylo Ren.

Here's what the plane is like inside.

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The Air Force wants to retire these 8 aircraft

Get ready for a new A-10 budget fight. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein wants to fund new initiatives in connectivity, space, combat power projection, and logistics starting in 2021 – to the tune of $30 billion on top of what it is already using. One way to do that, says Todd Harrison, a defense budget analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, is to retire $30 billion worth of legacy aircraft.

That is, get rid of the old stuff to make room for the new.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Christopher Woody

Hint about big changes coming to naval aviation hidden in new seal

November 2019, the US Navy unveiled the official seal for the future aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy, which was officially launched on Oct. 29, 2019 — three months ahead of schedule.

The Kennedy will be christened in Newport News, Virginia, on Dec. 7, 2019, and even though it likely won't be commissioned into service until 2020, the carrier's seal reveals what naval aviation will look like aboard the Kennedy in the decades to come.

The seal, which is meant to honor Kennedy, his Navy service, and his vision for space exploration, depicts several of the aircraft that will operate on the carrier.

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The Indian Army made a grenade from ghost peppers

Look out, Pakistan, the Indian Army just weaponized one of the world's hottest peppers. If it can stop a charging elephant, it can likely make militants think twice about starting trouble in Kashmir. The newest biological weapon on the market is a homegrown substance for India: Ghost Peppers.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Oriana Pawlyk

US F-35 fighter jets are all still 'below service expectations'

Even though the F-35 program is making strides, each of the Joint Strike Fighter variants is still coming up short on combat readiness goals, according to the Pentagon's top weapons tester.

Based on collected data for fiscal 2019, the Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy variants all remain "below service expectations" for aircraft availability, Robert Behler, director of the Pentagon's Operational Test and Evaluation Office, said Nov. 13, 2019.

"Operational suitability of the F-35 fleet remains below service expectations," he said before the House Subcommittee on Readiness and Tactical Air and Land Forces. "In particular, no F-35 variant meets the specified reliability or maintainability metrics."

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Lance Cpl. Alison Dostie

US Marines take the Humvee's replacement out for a spin

Multiple units on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton have started to introduce the new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle to their Marines by teaching them the basic operations of one of the Marine Corps' newest ground vehicles.

"The JLTV is a lot more capable than the Humvee," said Mario Marin, the JLTV lead instructor with the I Marine Expeditionary Force JLTV Operator New Equipment Training course. "The ability for the driver to actually manipulate the system itself, using what's called a MUX panel, a multi-plex panel, or the driver smart display. The driver has, at his finger tip, a lot of control of the vehicle. It has a lot of technological advances that the Humvee does not, and that is just your basic JLTV."

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Lisa Eadicicco

Huawei's Harmony OS may be ready for smartphones in 6 to 9 months

Chinese technology giant Huawei will decide whether it will have to move forward with bringing its Harmony OS operating system to its smartphones in the next six to nine months as it remains prohibited from working with American companies like Google, Vincent Pang, Huawei's senior vice president, told Business Insider during a press dinner on Nov. 12, 2019.

"We cannot wait more, we missed one flagship," Pang said, referring to Huawei's recently launched Mate 30 smartphone. That phone runs on the open-source version of Android that doesn't include any of Google's services or apps, including the Google Play Store.

The United States Commerce Department placed Huawei, the second largest smartphone vendor in the world by market share, on a trade blacklist that prevents it from doing business with American companies unless those firms obtain government permission.

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