This is why 'silencers' don't really exist — suppressors do

There's a common idea among people who get their gun education from movies and video games that all you need to make a firearm completely silent (or at least barely as loud as someone whispering, "pew") is to attach a silencer to the front of it. For the record, they are sometimes called "silencers," but they are still far from silent. The more accurate term is "suppressors."

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This is why no one uses water-cooled machine guns anymore

It was a common sight in World War I – the image of a machine gun spewing bullets from a barrel protruding from what looks like a giant canister. That canister is a healthy indication that the barrel of the machine gun in question is being cooled by water in the canister and that the water will soon be as hot as the barrel.

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Why did the US military switch from 7.62 to 5.56 rounds?

In the modern era, the M-16 style rifle chambered in 5.56x45mm has become ubiquitous in imagery of the U.S. military, but that wasn't always the case. America's adoption of the 5.56mm round and the service rifle that fires it both came about as recently as the 1960s, as the U.S. and its allies set about looking for a more reliable, accurate, and lighter general issue weapon and cartridge.

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This is what became of the Army's futuristic M-16 replacement rifle

The US military has long explored the idea of replacing its M-16 assault rifle with something newer and deadlier. From the 1990s onward, German arms giant, Heckler & Koch, was heavily involved in helping the US Army attempt to reach that objective, creating newfangled firearms that bear considerable resemblances to the guns you'd find in futuristic, sci-fi movies and TV shows.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Dorothy Mills-Gregg

All-female Air Force team wins bomb-building competition

The first all-female team to compete in the Rapid Aircraft Generation and Employment competition at Aviano Air Base, Italy, took home the win, the Air Force announced last week. And they did it while wearing costumes that paid tribute to Rosie the Riveter.

The RAGE contest began last October to highlight several adaptive basing procedures and is being held quarterly. Last year, a team named "Wing it" won.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Senior Airman Benjamin Cooper

How the Air Force's metals techs keep aircraft flying

The 100th Maintenance Squadron's aircraft metals technology technicians aim to achieve the highest levels of precision when grinding, welding, fabricating or repairing parts for Team Mildenhall aircraft.

For the airmen of the aircraft metals technology section, it's their job to ensure that Team Mildenhall has the tools and parts needed to accomplish the mission.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Karen Hunter

Targets to take your firearms training to the next level

What do you take to the shooting range? The most thought generally goes into firearm and ammunition selection, and the contents of your range bag will include most of the other essentials: eye protection, ear protection, and various tools. But in addition to the gun and the projectile, it's worth taking a few extra minutes to think about what you're shooting at. While it's easy to let targets be a part of the "range bag" — a standard piece of equipment that you need but don't put much thought into — they should be considered for each range session based on your goals.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Brittany Chang

Aston Martin teamed up with Airbus to create luxurious helicopter

Aston Martin and Airbus have teamed up to create a specially designed ACH130 helicopter.

The new ACH130 represents the first helicopter Aston Martin has ever created, according to the automaker.

"[The ACH130 marries] ACH's key values of excellence, quality and service with Aston Martin's commitment to beauty, handcrafting and automotive art to bring a new level of aesthetics and rigorous attention to detail to the helicopter market," Airbus wrote in a statement.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Oriana Pawlyk

The Air Force is studying ways to help airmen sleep

The Air Force has begun a formal study to analyze the sleep habits of airmen in an effort to prevent mistakes and mishaps caused by exhaustion.

The service said its 711th Human Performance Wing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, will examine sleep, fatigue and overall performance by tracking sleep habits "while also evaluating sleep-monitoring technology to ensure its accuracy and ability to work in an operational setting," officials said in a recent release.

"It's a multi-pronged approach to studying sleep and fatigue," said Dr. Glenn Gunzelmann, 711th HPW Airman Systems Directorate training core technical competency lead, in the release.

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