This carrier, a veteran of the Doolittle Raid, was just rediscovered after 76 years

In October of 1942, Charles Mason took one last look at the hulking gray warship the US Navy had entrusted to his command, ensuring that all other personnel had been accounted for and evacuated from its massive long decks. Seconds later, Mason jumped into the cold waters of the Pacific Ocean to be picked up by nearby American destroyers, leaving his now-empty and thoroughly damaged aircraft carrier — the USS Hornet — to its fate.

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This is how Beretta ended up as the US military's sidearm for three decades

This article is not meant to disparage Beretta's products. The 500-plus-year-old company has supplied arms to every major European war since 1650, and the results are just what a weapons manufacturer intends their products to do. When it came to replacing the legendary M1911 as the U.S. military's trusty sidearm, no one expected the Italian company to carry the day, but cost was the final factor for the Air Force. From there, it spread to all the branches.

The Army was not pleased.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Ms. Dawn M Arden

Army Military Police receive new Sig Sauer M17 and M18 pistols

The U.S. Army began fielding M17 and M18 Modular Handgun Systems to the Military Police School at Fort Leonard Wood in December 2018 to replace the force's aging Beretta M9, a weapon that has been in use since the mid-1980s and is quickly reaching its serviceability limits.

Sporting an integrated rail system, a polymer grip module and self-illuminating sights, the modernized 9 mm pistol produced by Sig Sauer couldn't have come at a better time, according to Mark Farley, USAMPS deputy commandant.

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A French company is developing target-acquiring drones for tanks

Remotely piloted aircraft, more commonly known as drones, have become an established part of warfare, serving as both intelligence/surveillance/reconnaissance (ISR for short) assets as well as attack platforms.

More recently, smaller man-portable drones have been proposed as a way to provide infantry units with a faster organic method of scanning the battlefield around them and relaying critical intelligence and data back to infantry leaders. Now, Nexter — a French defense contractor — wants to take drone usage in a different direction and attach them to heavy armored vehicles.

More specifically... tanks.

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The bug-out bag that allows you to be ready for anything

When you gotta go, you gotta go.

This article is sponsored by Propper, the guys dedicated to equipping those who commit their lives to serving others. In addition to the Propper gear that's perfect for the mission, we've scoured the market for the very best from other brands to build out a kit that's perfect for getting out of dodge in a hurry.

We don't know what you're preparing for. Maybe you've found yourself in hot water with a local gang, maybe you're convinced that the rise of automation will lead to SkyNet, or perhaps you have the very real concern that molemen will come out of the internal layers of the earth and demand large segments of surface world (an attack to which we are vulnerable thanks to everyone poo-pooing Capt. John Symmes' expedition to the center of the Earth).

Regardless, our friends over at Propper want to help you prepare. For our illustrative case, we're going to use a possible zombie outbreak model, because that's fun for us and something all patriotic Americans should prepare for.

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This is why the US Navy doesn't use battleships anymore

Long gone are the days where the United States Navy roamed the seas with heavily-armed battleships as its primary capital ships. Not everyone who talks naval warfare entirely agrees with mothballing the biggest guns of the American Navy, but there's a reason the old battleships are gone – and a reason they're never coming back.

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The 48th Fighter Wing gave 3 F-15s badass D-Day commemorative schemes

To observe the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the US Air Force's 48th Fighter Wing took 3 F-15 Eagles and gave them incredible paint jobs, reminiscent of the colorful and squadron-specific adornments featured on American fighters during the Second World War.

One jet from each of the 48th's fast mover units — the 492d, the 493d, and the 494th Fighter Squadrons — was briefly pulled from service to be spruced up with a custom color scheme selected by members of the 48th Equipment Maintenance Squadron.

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The Pentagon's alleged 'Killer Robots' are just a fantasy

The truth is much more boring. For now.

The U.S. Department of Defense just outlined its strategy to reap the benefits of artificial intelligence and the result is less Terminator and more Alexa. Rather than deploying a weapon that knows how to target and kill America's enemies, the Pentagon's AI strategy wants to focus on more mundane things here at home rather than blowing up exotic locations abroad.

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Why your future bunkers might be made of wood

The material used by the second-dumbest of the Three Pigs is making a comeback.

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but they're also great building materials. And the Department of Defense is eyeing a return to stick-based construction in some places where it currently uses concrete and similar materials. Fire and blast tests have already gone well, and the Army is working with universities to test its performance against ballistic weapons.

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