Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY TACTICAL

The US Army actually had a man-portable, four-barrel rocket launcher

(20th Century Fox)

The Army's recent order of a four-bore rifle prototype made some waves. It's a pretty exciting piece of technology, but if it gets picked up, it won't be the first four-barrel weapon that American troops have fielded. And while this new prototype rifle fires 6mm rounds at an impressive rate, the older system packed a bigger wallop.

This older four-barrel system wasn't a rifle, however, it was a rocket launcher called the M202 FLASH. "FLASH," in this case, stood for FLame Assault SHoulder weapon. It packed four 66-millimeter M74 rockets that were held together by a clip.


As the full name of the rocket launcher suggests, the rockets were equipped with incendiary warheads. It replaced the traditional flamethrowers that had seen a lot of action in World War II, much to the relief of the grunts who once carried them.

Traditional flamethrowers, like this M2 being used in the Pacific Theater, were effective, but had a lot of drawbacks.

(US Army)

Traditional flamethrowers were backpack-mounted. The canisters on their backs were filled with what was, essentially, jellied gasoline. To make matters worse for the GI carrying a large, flammable target on their back, they had to get within 47 yards of the enemy to use a traditional flamethrower.

While flamethrowers were devastating to enemy positions and extremely effective at clearing terrain, the guy who carried it on his back was in danger of becoming a very crispy critter should his flamethrower get hit. And there's no hiding who's carrying a flamethrower. This made the specially-trained operators a target.

The M202 entered service in 1978 and has seen action in the Global War on Terror.

(US Army)

The M202A1 eliminated a lot of those drawbacks. Any number of grunts could be trained to use the system. The weapon is still distinctive but, according to U.S. Army Training Circular 23-2, it has a maximum range of just over 800 yards. While you're not always going to be firing from maximum range, it's a lot better than being within a stone's throw.

Each of the M74 rockets fired by the M202 packed about 1.3 pounds of what the Army called a "thickened pyrophoric agent," called triethylaluminum. This burned at temperatures of up to 2200 degrees Fahrenheit, similar to white phosphorus ("Willie Pete").

The M202 has been obscured — largely because it had its share of hiccups. Still, it's seen some action in the War on Terror — and in a few of our favorite movies and games. The M202 made an appearance in Arnold Schwarzenegger's Commando, Capcom's Resident Evil, and Overkill Software's Payday 2.

Take that, T-Virus.

(Capcom)