Photo: Don Cler/US Army, video TechLink.

The Army Combat Capabilities Development Center (CCDC) Research Lab is testing a new suppressor with an integrated muzzle brake that will help soldiers maintain accurate and quiet fire on the enemy in future battlefields. This new device is aptly named "Smuzzle."

Smuzzle's design was originally meant for the Army's 155mm howitzers, yet the inventors turned afterward to one of the army's most common automatic weapons, the M240B. Greg Oberlin, Daniel Cler, and Eric Binter, the inventors of the new equipment, were trying to reduce recoil and muzzle flash while also reducing the sound from the machinegun.


Standard suppressors for the 7.62 mm caliber were unable to withstand the intense heat of the M240B (which is known as "the pig" by the soldiers who carry it in the field).

The device is currently undergoing testing on the M240B with the NATO 7.62×51 mm round as well as the Next-Generation Squad Weapon Technology 6.8mm round. (The 6.8mm round reduces the volume at the shooter's ear by half, volume downrange by 25 percent, and recoil by a third said Oberlin, a small arms engineer at the Army's CCDC Army Research Lab.)

The three inventors began their research back in 2007. They were recently awarded a 20-year utility patent with the Army in late March 2020.

"A few years ago, we were asked whether our next-gen squad weapon should have a muzzle brake or a suppressor," Oberlin said in an interview with TechLink. "We asked ourselves 'why not both?'"

Like any small-caliber muzzle brake, this new device vents the pressurized gas of each shot to counteract the recoil of the rifle. By venting the gas through a series of tiny asymmetric holes, the device has — in testing thus far — reduced volume by 50 percent and flash signature by 25 percent with minimal weight increase (0.8-3.0 pounds). "Suppressors are notorious for increasing flash," Cler said. Furthermore, the Smuzzle adds only three inches to the weapon's overall length.

When a weapon is fired using a suppressor, gases are trapped inside from the sound rings from the front of the suppressor back to the breech. That spreads the carbon throughout the weapon. It can force the soldier to clean the weapon more frequently.

"That brake baffle actually has a curvature to it borrowed from a 155mm muzzle brake I designed," Cler said. But the researchers have stated that the device is scalable to any caliber.

"It was designed for automatic and semi-automatic weapons, but it'd be useful for anyone shooting magnum cartridges," Cler said. "It has what you could call a bottom blocker that also reduces how much dust kicks up." A smaller Smuzzle weighing 0.8 lbs and other larger versions weighing approximately 3 lbs have been developed to be used depending on a weapon's caliber.

Binter said in a piece with the Army Times that although they have not yet tested the prototype devices to failure, nevertheless some of them had already fired 10,000 rounds through the weapons which continue to hold up to the sound, recoil, and accuracy standards.

In one test the researchers fired hundreds of rounds through one prototype Smuzzle attached to an M240B machine gun in a full auto failure test. (See video below.)

"It was glowing red, but it never failed," Cler said.

In testing the weapon is expected to be able to sustain a rate of fire of 600 rounds per minute.

This article originally appeared on SOFREP. Follow @sofrepofficial on Twitter.