MIGHTY CULTURE

We tried Google's veteran job search after their Super Bowl commercial

Firing 155mm howitzers at targets spotted with high-tech drones in order to open a corridor for sappers and infantry to break through enemy defenses is great and fun, but it doesn't translate easily into corporate skills.

So now, Google is helping make a translator that will match up veterans and corporations.

As companies realize more and more that veterans as a community bring many ideal traits to the business place, such as an accelerated learning curve and attention to detail, there's a bigger push to hire a vet. So now it's just a matter of translating "COMBAT ARCHER linchpin; prep'd 4 tms/1st ever JASSM live fire--validated CAF's #1 F-16 standoff capes" into a resume bullet.

Enter Google.


First: watch the commercial

In one of two 2019 Super Bowl commercials, Google advertised their Job Search for Veterans initiative, where service members can enter their military occupational specialty codes into a google search and find relevant civilian jobs that require similar skills.

"Will a cubicle in the corner work for you?"

By typing "jobs for veterans" in Google followed by the appropriate MOS/NEC/AFSC/etc, they can pull up a more streamlined job search. It still seems to be a hit-or-miss function, but I just assume most computer algorithms get more efficient with time. Remember CleverBot?

I should definitely ask We Are The Mighty for a raise...

Google picked up on my management experience and even though I don't have a business background, I feel confident that I could go in and land any of these jobs. As an Air Force intelligence officer, however, I have one of the easiest careers to transition into the civilian work place.

So then I tried it out on Logan Nye, one of our Army guys:

Logan, come back to Los Angeles.

According to Nye, "[Public Affairs Print Journalist] doesn't learn video at all. You know, the 3rd entry in that list. And public relations managers mostly build programs, which is a 46A thing. Editor is arguably within reach for 46Qs. Assistant editor is definitely within reach for good 46Qs. But the rest of these have only a limited connection to what 46Qs actually do and learn."

Nye argued that it might be the most difficult for junior- to mid-enlisted vets to step straight into these kinds of six-figure jobs, especially given how specific military training is in reference to the equipment used and the culture that surrounds the job. Troops considering getting out will need to make sure they're developing the skills needed for the target job, because the military "equivalent" won't be a perfect match.

That might be true, but I would maintain that this gives veterans insight into civilian careers similar to their own. This gives them a place to begin with adjacent training requirements.

I'll bring it back to the accelerated learning curve. Vets are used to moving around and learning on-the-job training quickly; we're conditioned to adapt because of our military foundation: discipline, hard work, mission-focused, service before self.

At the end of the day, I appreciate any resource or hiring initiative out there for veterans, many of whom put their careers on hold to serve in the military. Adjusting to the civilian workforce can take some time, but 'Job Search for Veterans' seems to make it just a little bit easier — and will hopefully give vets more confidence about the jobs they apply for.

Just keep your quirks to yourself until after you get the job.