After much back and forth, it looks like the summit between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un is back on schedule. The details are starting to emerge about the quickly-approaching June 12 conference, including expected talking points, the venue, and the extensive security measures in place.

Each leader is responsible for bringing their own security detail from their own nation, but the overall security is going to be overseen by none other than the world's most intense fighting force: the Nepalese Gurkhas.

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Gurkhas have earned a reputation for being the hardest and most well-trained mercenaries in the world. They've formed a strong bond with the United Kingdom's forces in East Asia and used Hong Kong as a base of operations until 1997. Today, they're based out of the UK and are still the premier fighting force in East Asia.

That also makes them extremely close American allies.(Photo by William B. King)

They maintain a relatively low profile considering their legendary status in law enforcement. Recently, they watched over a security conference between Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, and other East Asian ministers in Singapore.

They'll be at it again when President Trump and Kim Jong-un meet for the first time.


Each Gurkha is rigorously trained and outfitted with some of the best armor and weaponry in the world. In addition to this high-tech armory, each Gurkha is armed with their signature khukuri knife. It's said that this knife must draw blood each time it's unsheathed.

Gurkha police officer And their blades are thirsty. (Courtesy Photo)

As Tim Huxley, an expert on Singapore's armed forces, told Business Insider,

"They remain very much a substantial and frontline force, and the demands of this kind of event are precisely the sort of special operation that the Gurkhas are trained to handle."

It is unknown how many Gurkhas will be deployed for the conference but the International Institute for Strategic Studies lists the total number of Gurkhas in the Singapore police at 1,800, divided among six different paramilitary companies.