History

Condoms: Good for love, better for war

Condoms have a long history of preventing pregnancies and the sexual transmission of diseases, but they also have a shorter history of protecting troops in combat. Here are just some of the times that troops used their little MOPP gear in wartime.

Rubber, sheep skin, love sock, penis sheath, raincoat, scum bag, prophylactic, the goalie, nodding sock, the Royal wanker, MOPP gear, or, if you're feeling vanilla, just plain ol' "condom."

No matter what you call it, condoms are great for conducting amphibious landings when you don't want to exchange fluids with the host country. But they're also good for a host of other things, as numerous enterprising service members have discovered over the years.

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History

This is the history for each branch's battle cry

It's a general call to action. The formation snaps to attention and the unit shouts out their branch's battle cry. It gets used as a general stand-in for regular words and the listener can often pick up context clues to infer what the word replaces. Soldiers can respond to most things with a simple "hooah" and their leader can assume they're saying either "yes," "no," "I don't really want to, but whatever," or "screw you," all from a single, guttural grunt.

Though each branch's battle cry sounds similar, they different meanings and vastly different origins. Because there are no official records of the exact moment a word was first uttered, many of these have multiple origins. What follows are the most agreed upon.

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History

These are the 7 finest moments in Army history

The U.S. Army has over 240 years of storied history, defending America in war after war. The branch ensures American ideals around the world and has stood strong against fascists, dictators, and kings. These are seven of their finest moments.

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History

How the legendary Dam Busters crippled Germany

The legendary 617 Squadron "Dam Busters" were specially formed to destroy German dams in the Ruhr region of Germany in World War II, crippling German industry, forcing the Nazis to shift thousands of forced laborers to rebuild the dams and get the factories going. All at a time when they needed tanks to defend against Soviet invasions and workers to fortify Normandy.

One of the most legendary successes of the Royal Air Force in World War II was a bombing raid that was written off for decades as a largely symbolic victory, but was actually a technically challenging operation that choked Nazi industry in 1943 and helped ensure that German factories couldn't produce the materiel necessary to win.

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History

Germans tried to assassinate Hitler all the time

Look, killing Baby Hitler may be unethical — in fact, there's a whole mind game centered around that idea (I'm in the camp that you kill Baby Hitler, but whatever) — but killing Adult Hitler is less controversial, and the Germans actually attempted it very often. Here are four of the best attempts, all of which narrowly failed.

Lots of people like to play a mind game that centers around one moral quandary: Would you kill baby Hitler? Yeah, it's Hitler, but it's also a baby... Hell, this same question was even jokingly debated during an episode of Superstore, where the crew tries to decide whether you should help a celebrity steal baby Hitler. Apparently, "killing" Hitler was a step too far for NBC.

But it wasn't for Germans living under the Third Reich, who actually tried to kill adult Hitler multiple times. In fact, if you add in assassination attempts from the Allies, there were at least 15 attempts on Hitler's life, with more planned but never executed. Here are four of the best assassination attempts by German citizens:

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History

These are the 7 finest moments in Air Force history

The Air Force is now aged well into its seventies and the branch that started as an offshoot of the U.S. Army is looking at having a child of its own — the U.S. Space Force. Even though the mere need for the U.S. Air Force is one that is still debated in some circles, it's pretty safe to say the service is here to stay, and for good reason. The men, women, and aircraft of the U.S. Air Force have accomplished some of the most incredible feats in military history.

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History
Karl Smallwood

These insane defenses allow Switzerland to remain neutral

The tiny mountainous country of Switzerland has been in a state of "perpetual neutrality" since the major European powers of the time declared it as such during the Congress of Vienna after the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815.

Why did they do this?

The French conquered Switzerland in 1798, establishing the Helvetic Republic in attempt to make Switzerland something of a strategically positioned French satellite state. Not long after, Austrian and Russian forces invaded the country in their war against France. The Swiss, rather than fighting alongside their French overlords, largely refused. This ultimately led to the Act of Mediation, giving the Swiss back much of their former independence. Twelve years later, they got the rest thanks to the aforementioned Congress of Vienna in which their neutrality in the wars of their neighbors was officially recognised.

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History

Iran banned this most American of hairstyles

Forget business in the front, party in the rear. Iran is all business. There's no party around back. At least, not for the most American of all possible hairstyles: the mullet. The mullet is so American, in fact, that it's banned in Iran for precisely that reason. Iran's Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance said goodbye to the haircut for being "un-Islamic."

The haircut was on a list of "decadent Western haircuts" that were banned, alongside ponytails, spiked hairstyles, and long hair in general in 2010.

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History

These are the only combat jumps US troops have made since 9/11

It was once the most heroic thing a soldier could do. They'd strap themselves up with the barest of combat essentials and jump out of the back of a perfectly good aircraft into uncertain danger — often ending up miles away from their intended drop zone and, sometimes, completely on their own.

Combat jumps led the Allied Forces to victory in WWII. These same tactics were employed during the Korean War and Vietnam War and, eventually, were used by Rangers and Green Berets in Grenada and Panama. When it came time for the Global War on Terrorism, well, let's just say there are only a handful of combat jumps that come without asterisks attached.

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