This Kazakh independence symbol is a golden suit of armor

For most Americans, Kazakhstan evokes images of Sacha Baron Cohen's Borat character, driving across America, uttering timeless quotes about his wife, his neighbor Ursultan, or those a**holes in Uzbekistan. Those interested in military history might want to look beyond Borat's neon green bikini – it was a Kazakh who hoisted the Soviet flag over the Reichstag during World War II after all and until it was absorbed into the Soviet Union, Kazakh tribes remained largely undefeated in military history.

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These were the Mercy Dogs of World War I

Man's best friend has also been man's battle buddy for as long as dogs have been domesticated. The mechanical, industrialized slaughter in the trenches of World War I didn't change that one bit. All the belligerents let slip the dogs of war, some 30,000 in all. They were used to hunt rats, guard posts as sentries, scout ahead, and even comfort the dying.

The last were the mercy dogs of the Great War.

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This enemy of France earned its top military honors

Emir Abdelkader is sometimes called the "George Washington of Algeria," and he was perhaps best known for rallying tribes to Algerian independence, something that France wasn't too keen on since it controlled Algeria. But, when Emir found his community persecuting Christians, he sheltered them and earned France's top military honors.

Emir Abdelkader was born the son of a respected military leader who had helped harass French occupiers in Algeria. As might be expected, young Emir continued his father's war against the French in a conflict that had religious overtones since, you know, the Algerians were mostly Muslim and the French predominantly Christian. But when he rode forth to save Christians from angry mobs in 1860, France conferred on him its top military honors, the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor.

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A sixth grade history project exonerated the captain of the USS Indianapolis

In 1945, the USS Indianapolis completed its top secret mission of delivering atomic bomb components to Tinian Island in the Pacific Theater of World War II. The heavy cruiser was sunk on its way to join a task force near Okinawa. Of the ship's 1195 crewmembers, only 316 survived the sinking and the subsequent time adrift at sea in the middle of nowhere. Among the survivors was the captain of the Indianapolis, Charles B. McVay III.

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MIGHTY HISTORY
Reynaldo Leal

How Navajo code talkers helped win the Battle of Iwo Jima

Thomas H. Begay didn't want to be a radio operator. In fact, up until he graduated from bootcamp, he thought he was going to become an aerial gunner for the Marine Corps during World War II.

"They sent me to a confidential area," he said. "I walked in and there's a whole bunch of Navajo."

His previous MOS didn't matter. Begay would attend code talking school.

The Navajo language had become the basis of a new code, and they were going to train to become code talkers. It was hard to see it then, but Begay and his fellow Navajo would help turn the tides of war and save countless lives.

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Coke exists thanks to this wounded warrior from Civil War

You know that common bit of trivia about how Coca-Cola used to have cocaine in it? Well, it turns out the inventor had good reason for a constant trickle of anesthesia. He was trying to get some relief from the unhealed saber wound in his chest, a souvenir from his cavalry service at Columbus, Georgia.

There's a fun fact that you can't escape in the South: Coca-Cola used to have cocaine in it. The Coke brand is everywhere down here, and every 14-year-old will bring up the cocaine fact a couple of times a week for the first six months after they learn about it.

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MIGHTY HISTORY
Petty Officer 1st Class Lynn Andrews

Navy uses WWII-era 'bean-bag drop' for aircraft communication

One-hundred-ten degree heat radiated from the flight deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) as an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter swooped in and dropped a message resurrecting an 80-year-old aircraft-to-ship alternative communication method.

Historically, war tends to accelerate change and drives rapid developments in technology. Even with superior modern capabilities, the US Navy still keeps a foot in the old sailboat days and for good reason.

During the sea battles of WWII, US Navy pilots beat enemy eavesdropping by flying low and slow above the flight deck and dropping a weighted cloth container with a note inside. This alternative form of communication was termed a "bean-bag drop."

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This pilot crashed his plane into the guns that shot him down

U.S. Air Force Maj. Charles Loring Jr. was leading a dive bomb attack on Chinese and Korean artillery and anti-aircraft positions in 1952 when those same guns managed to heavily damage his plane. Instead of calling off the attack, he leaned into it and crashed his entire jet into the people shooting at him.

Air Force Maj. Charles J. Loring Jr. was a veteran of World War II, former prisoner of war, and an accomplished fighter and bomber pilot when he took off on a mission over Korea on Nov. 22, 1952. When North Korean batteries scored hits on his plane that would normally force the pilot to abort the mission, Loring turned his dive bomber into a kamikaze plane instead.

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One guy might be the reason we haven't found Amelia Earhart

The tragic disappearance of Amelia Earhart in 1937 remains among the most pervasive mysteries in American culture. Earhart, a groundbreaking female aviator and celebrity in her own time, knew her goal of circumnavigating the globe in her Lockheed Electra was a dangerous one, but she and the American public seemed assured that she would be successful, just as she had been so many times before.

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