History

How this paratrooper got his trench knife back after 70 years

Which story is better – how he fought in Europe or how he got his knife back? You decide.

During the launch of Operation Market Garden, a young Nelson Bryant and thousands of fellow paratroopers from the 82d Airborne parachuted into occupied Holland in an attempt to dislodge its Nazi occupiers. Bryant, wounded in a previous mission, took shrapnel to the leg as he fell to Earth. After landing, he began freeing himself from his harness. Under fire from nearby German positions, he was forced to cut it off.

Without thinking, he dropped his knife as he scrambled for cover. It seemed to be lost forever — but it was actually only 73 years.

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GAMING

Yes, the mini-nuke launcher was a thing and yes, it was a terrible idea

In the game series Fallout, one of the weapons most coveted by players is a portable mini-nuke launcher that, as you might imagine, is capable of destroying basically anything it touches. It fits perfectly within the game's theme of roaming across the apocalyptic wasteland, dispensing wanton destruction.

Bethesda, the developers behind Fallout, weren't just pulling something out of thin air when they designed the digital weapon. In the late 1950s, when the threat of nuclear war with the Soviets was lurking around the corner, the U.S. actually created a functioning mini-nuke launcher of their very own.

It was called the M-29 Davy Crockett Weapon System. And the reason it never really made it out of initial testing was because it was probably the most poorly designed weapon system the U.S. military ever thought would work.

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History

This Medal of Honor recipient was the Navy's first ace-in-a-day

Not only did Navy Lt. Edward H. "Butch" O'Hare earn a Medal of Honor and down seven enemy aircraft in the war, he downed five of them in one engagement, resulting in "ace-in-a-day" status.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Edward H. "Butch" O'Hare was a pioneer of Navy aviation, establishing the Navy's first night fighter squadron, earning a Medal of Honor and ace-in-a-day status, and probably saving American carrier USS Lexington before his tragic death during a night battle in November, 1943.

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History

This terrifying disease started in World War I Europe

Encephalitis lethargica sounds more like a horror-movie disease than something out of real life. It puts some patients into an endless sleep while causing others, especially children, to lose all inhibitions and impulse control, leading them to conduct terrifying acts of self-mutilation, sexual violence, and other heinous crimes.

Encephalitis lethargica is a disease that seems to belong in a horror movie, complete with brain damage that causes victims to sleep for years or to hack away at their own bodies — and it all started in Europe during World War I.

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History

Why artillerymen should bring back their distinctive 'Redlegs'

Every combat arms branch within the United States Army comes with a long legacy. And with that legacy comes an accompanying piece of flair for their respective dress uniforms. Infantrymen rock a baby blue fourragere on their right shoulder, cavalrymen still wear their spurs and stetsons, and even Army aviators sport their very own badges in accordance with their position in the unit.

But long before the blue cords and spurs, another combat arms branch had their own unique uniform accouterment — one that has since been lost to time. Artillerymen once had scarlet red piping that ran down the side of their pant legs. In fact, these stripes were once so iconic that it gave rise to a nickname for artillerymen: "redlegs."

Due to wartime restrictions, artillerymen stopped wearing the red piping during WWI — and it never made a comeback.

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History
Ryan Pickrell

10 photos show the 108-year history of carrier aviation

Exactly 108 years ago on Nov. 14, 2018, carrier aviation was born from an experiment that would eventually evolve into one of the most important aspects of modern warfare.

Here are some impressive moments in the history of carrier aviation.

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History

That time high-value POWs were rescued from Nazis by the Nazis

The SS and the Wehrmacht did not get along.

Nazi SS forces tasked with guarding the Nazis' most high-value prisoners finally moved them all to a single place as the war (and the Nazi party) was nearing its end. Among those were troops with famous names, like Churchill. There were former world leaders who happened to be of Jewish descent, like Hungary's Miklos Kallay. Prince Philip Von Hesse was there, too. And there were members of high-ranking military families, like the Von Stauffenbergs (whose patriarch famously tried to kill Hitler in the Valkyrie plot).

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History

See the uniforms and kit that armies took to war in 1914

The armies at the start of World War I were underprepared for a global conflict, meaning that most soldiers marching to the front were forced to do it with inadequate gear or less-than-stellar uniforms. Here's what they wore to war.

When World War I broke out in 1914, European armies rushed to war with the armies they had, not the armies they wanted to have. Some soldiers, lucky enough to serve in forces that had recently seen combat, were well equipped for an industrial war with camouflaged uniforms and modern weaponry.

Others shipped out wearing parade gear.

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This is why Army officers aren't allowed to carry umbrellas

The United States Military is full of bizarre rules that, at some point, probably served some obscure purpose before being ingrained in tradition. For example, you're not allowed to keep your hands in your pockets. It all began because, apparently, putting your hands in your pockets "detracts from military smartness." I don't know about you, but in my lifetime, I've never equated pocketed hands with being aloof — but the rules are rules. Quit asking questions.

But if you're looking for an antiquated rule that's really nonsensical, look no further than the (now) unwritten rule that states officers of the United States Army cannot carry an umbrella. It might not be an official regulation anymore, but all Army officers generally adhere to the rule regardless, for tradition's sake.

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