7 ships sunk at Pearl Harbor fought in World War II

A shocking number of the ships sunk at Pearl Harbor got a chance at revenge.

While "salvage operations" aren't usually stories of perseverance and ingenuity, the actions of brave sailors and officers after the Pearl Harbor attacks formed a miracle that is legitimately surprising. While the battleships Utah, Arizona, and Oklahoma were permanently lost after the Pearl Harbor attacks, seven combat ships that were sunk in the raid went on to fight Japanese and German forces around the world, and at least three non-combat ships saw further service in the war.

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See how an individual scout survived the massacre at Little Bighorn

Scout William Jackson prepared a lengthy statement on what happened that fateful day...

The soldiers fighting at Little Bighorn in 1876 were facing long odds. The initial attack seemed to favor federal government forces, but they quickly found that the Native forces were much larger and stronger than originally suspected. Scout William Jackson, a member of the Blackfeet Tribe, also known as Sikakoan, recalled the fighting in an Army historical document. It's as dark as you might expect, but also (surprisingly) funny at times.

Let's take a ride:

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Why Germany was always the underdog in World War II

The Third Reich had a fatal weakness that it was unlikely to ever overcome.

Don't get me wrong; I'm not here to make you sympathize with the Nazis. They were literally a hate group that committed murder on a national scale in addition to helping start and prosecute the deadliest war in human history. They were evil, so don't let a title like "Underdog" garner them any sympathy. It's the fault of the fascists that this war ever happened in the first place.

But, while the German military was one of the most feared and successful in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the Third Reich had a severe weakness that would hamper the military at any turn: economics.

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That time the Royal Navy welded together a 'Frankenship'

At the onset of World War I, the warring powers needed all the help they could get on both land and sea. So, when the British Empire lost two of her ships to mines and torpedoes, they did the only logical thing they could think of: welded the remaining pieces together and sent the ship back into the war.

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Abraham Lincoln challenged US troops to this strength test

Of all the things our 16th President is remembered for these days, his uncanny strength is often overlooked. During his days on the American frontier, he was known for his strength and wrestling prowess. The "Rail Splitter" (Lincoln's nickname), was a volunteer soldier during the Black Hawk War and even manhandled a violent viewer during one of his political speeches, leaving the podium to toss a man 12 feet away from the crowd.

The Confederacy clearly didn't know who they were dealing with.

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Why the Soviet Union wanted to nuke this hot dog stand

For around 30 years, the food court at the center of the Pentagon's courtyard was an easy source of mid-afternoon calories for the hungry planners of a potential World War III with the Eastern Bloc. There was just one problem, and it wasn't the food.

It was said the Soviet Union had at least two nuclear missiles pointed at it at all times.

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How Teddy Roosevelt's gun was as awesome as he was

In April 1990, the FBI was called to Teddy Roosevelt's house. No one would dare steal from TR while he was alive, but since he had been dead for 70-plus years and his house was long ago turned into a museum, the thief was able to rob the place and make off with an important piece of Americana: Teddy Roosevelt's piece. They stole the pistol he used at the Battle of San Juan Hill.

To this day, no one knows who took it, and only the FBI knows who turned it in, but now it's back where it belongs. Its history is America's history, and the history of Teddy Roosevelt's sidearm matches the legacy of the man who wielded it. It started with a sinking ship.

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5 crazy random things people added guns to

Different weapons serve different purposes in combat, but every fighter in history has looked for an edge – one advantage that could mean the difference between life and death for the combatant. In an era where everyone is cutting each other with increasingly sharp blades of different sizes, wouldn't it be great if that ax also shot bullets?

If you happened to be the one holding the ax, then yes: that would be great. Unless your opponent was holding a shield – especially if that shield also shot bullets.

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The chemical weapon so deadly even the Nazis couldn't use it

A toxic chemical that can melt tanks? No thanks.

In World War II, every country was looking for an edge, so it's pretty amazing that the Nazis found one and then decided against it – and rightly so. Chlorine trifluoride ignites on contact with almost any substance, burns at over 2000°C, and will melt tanks, bunkers, schools, and pretty much anything it comes into contact with.

Some things are better left alone.

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