History

4 things you didn't know about the easiest medal you'll ever earn

When young men and women join the military, the majority of them dream of making a huge impact, day one, on America's armed forces — if not the world. From the moment we touch the training grounds of boot camp to the graduation ceremony, we show up ready to make our mark on history by earning different accolades.


Those accomplishments are represented in form of certificates, letters of recommendation, and, of course, ribbons and medals.

Although some of those distinguishments are tough-as-hell to earn, others get pinned on our chest just for making it through boot camp.

One of those earnings, the National Defense Service Medal, or NDSM, is one of the simplest medals you'll earn.

Related: 5 things you didn't know about the Navy's Medal of Honor

Here's what you didn't know about the NDSM:

4. Its origin

The NDSM was inked into existence when former President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed Executive Order 10448 on Apr. 22, 1953. It was to serve as a "blanket" campaign medal for service members who honorably served in the military during a period of "national emergency."

President Eisenhower, 1954. (Photo under public domain)

3. You actually earned the medal?

Since the medal's establishment, there have been periods of time in which the U.S. isn't been involved a major conflict. Many veterans who served during those times don't rate to wear this medal since they didn't serve during "national emergency" periods.

Those who served during the Korean War, Vietnam, the Gulf War, and the Global War on Terrorism all rate to wear the ribbon above their heart if they've served for more than 89 days — including boot camp.

2. The medal's front design

The medal features an eagle perched on a sword and palm branch. The eagle, of course, is the national symbol for the United States, the sword represents the armed forces, and the palm branch is symbolic of victory.

Also Read: 5 reasons why the Volunteer Service Medal is the most ridiculous medal

1. The meaning behind medal's reverse side

The center showcases the great seal of the United States, flanked by laurel and oak, which symbolize achievement and strength.