Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY HISTORY

13 new photos from the Air Force's D-Day flyover

Seventy-five years ago, tens of thousands of men were churning their way through the hedgerows of Normandy, fighting tooth and nail to liberate French towns and to ensure the security of the tenuous toehold that the Allies had opened against Germany in Operation Overlord on D-Day. This toehold would grow until it was a massive front that made it all the way to Berlin in less than a year.


Now, 75 years later, the U.S. and Allied militaries are celebrating their forebears' success with a series of events in the U.K. and France. As part of these celebrations, the U.S. Air Force flew two F-15E Strike Eagles with special, heritage paint jobs over the fields and hedgerows of modern day Normandy on June 9, 2019. Here are 13 photos from an Air Force photographer sent to document the event:

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

The special Strike Eagles are part of the 48th Fighter Wing and took off from Royal Air Force Base Lakenheath, England, for the flyover. During the D-Day invasion, U.S. Army Air Corps fighters and bombers took off from English air bases to support the landings on the beaches, pushing back the Luftwaffe screens and reducing the number of bombers and dive bombers that troops on the ground would have to endure.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

The Army Air Corps' bombs softened targets and reduced enemy artillery positions and other defenses, but the fight in the hedgerows was still bloody and vicious. And the German coastal artillery had to be eliminated to keep as many pilots in the sky as possible.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

But the pilots who preceded the modern Air Force began the important preparations for D-Day months ahead of time, sending increased bomber formations against Germany, including Berlin, for five months ahead of D-Day. These bomber formations doomed the Luftwaffe, Germany's air force, in two ways.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

First, there's the obvious. The bombers destroyed German factories and war machines, annihilating German equipment and crippling the country's ability to rebuild it. But Germany responded by sending up their fighters to stop the bombers, and that's where new American fighters came into the fray.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

The P-47s with drop tanks led the charge in 1943, but other fighters joined the fray at the end of '43 and start of '44. The P-51B, along with other fighters including the British Spitfires and Typhoons, slayed the German fighters that rose to counter the bombers. By June 1944, the Luftwaffe was a shadow of its former self.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

Army Air Corps pilots gave their lives to prepare for June 6, 1944, and other pilots would make the ultimate sacrifice on D-Day and in the weeks and months that followed. But that perseverance and sacrifice paid dividends, allowing for the Allied defeat of Nazi Germany in May 1945.

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)

(U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Plew)