It was not an ending befitting a man of Lincoln's personal stature. He died in a bed at the House of a local tailor, William Petersen. He didn't die right away, instead dying the next morning after a night of labored breathing. His assassin, John Wilkes Booth, bolted out the door and made for Maryland, crossing the Navy Yard bridge after the evening curfew. From there, he and his conspirators made their way to Virginia, where they were captured and eventually executed.


The killing was dramatic, public, and caused a popular outcry that has persisted for generations – and continues to this day.

The manhunt for Booth and the co-conspirators, those who also attacked Secretary of State William Seward and failed to murder Vice-President Andrew Johnson, was the largest in American history. It was personally led by Lincoln's Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton. A reward for a sum equal to more than $800,000 when adjusted for inflation was offered for Booth and searches were conducted by the U.S. goddamn Army.

You know you maxed-out your wanted level when the U.S. military is after you.

Booth and accomplice David Herold made it to a Virginia farm one night and were asleep in the barn when the 16th New York Cavalry came calling. Herold surrendered when the cavalry ordered the men to come out, but Booth would not be taken alive. As soldiers set fire to the barn, the assassin gathered his weapons and made for the back door. Unfortunately for Booth, Sgt. Thomas "Boston" Corbett was already there, having snuck around to the back earlier. He shot Booth in the back of the head just below where Booth hit President Lincoln. The assassin was paralyzed immediately and died outside the farmhouse, surrounded by Union cavalry two hours later.

Of the eight people arrested for the conspiracy, four were hanged (including Herold), three were given life sentences, and one served six years. Booth's body was rolled into a horse blanket and eventually buried next to the four who were hanged for their crimes. They were moved briefly before being turned over to his family in 1869. They moved his body to their family plot near Baltimore. There, in that plot, you'll find a small, unmarked stone – one likely covered in pennies.

Visitors believe this to be John Wilkes Booth's final resting place, and leave pennies on top of the marker as a means to mock the assassin, more than a century after his death. The penny (in case you don't use cash) usually features the image of President Lincoln. It's far more economical to get your kicks in with a penny than with a $5 bill.