MIGHTY HISTORY

6 reasons why Vikings were just like our Marines, long before Tun Tavern

Troops today love to liken themselves to the warfighters of old — Spartans, crusaders, knights, pirates, or whatever else. It helps our troops buy into the classic warrior mentality and it makes us feel more badass. When it comes to U.S. Marines, there's really one comparison that stands out above the rest as apt: the Vikings of the middle-ages.


I'm not going to sit here and tell you, young Marine, which historical badass you should try to emulate — you do you. But if you're looking for some inspiration from history's toughest customers; if you're looking for some sea-faring, slightly-degenerate tough guys that howl for a fight, you'd do well to start your search with the Vikings.


Here's where Vikings and modern Marines overlap:

1. Both were masters at disembarking amphibious landing ships to fight on land

First and foremost, there are no two groups in history more feared for their ability to storm beaches and absolutely destroy everything within range than Vikings and U.S. Marines. The Vikings are famous for their sieges on Northumbria while the Marines are known for successes during the South Pacific campaign of WWII. For both groups, their presence alone is often enough to force a surrender.

But their skills on the coastline don't discredit their ability to fight inland. Vikings, accustomed to the frigid north, fared extremely well when fighting in the Holy Lands — not too far from there was where the Marines fought in the Second Battle of Fallujah.

2. Both are known for intense post-combat partying

Another key trait of the Viking lifestyle that isn't too far off from what happens in the average lower-enlisted barracks of any Marine Corps installation: consuming volumes of alcohol that would incapacitate mere mortals is just the pregame for Vikings and lance corporals.

Hell, one of the stories of Thor is about him basically trying to drink an entire ocean made of booze.

3. Both share a deep brotherhood with their fellow fighters

Most troops, regardless of era, become friends with the guys to their left and right, but Marines and Vikings are known for taking that brotherhood to a new level.

The Viking mercenaries, known as the Jomsvikings, followed a strict code that revolved around brotherhood among their ranks and their motto is roughly translated as, "one shield, one brotherhood." This way of live was written into their 11 codes of conduct. It doesn't matter who you were before you became a Jomsviking, but so as long as you're a brother, you will not fight with each other and you will avenge another should they fall in combat. And if there was infighting, the dispute was mediated by the leadership (or chain of command).

All of these things are essentially within the UCMJ.

​I'm highly confident that a Jomsviking leader would have been completely cool with wall-to-wall counselling to solve any issues. 

4. Both had a penchant for giving each other nicknames

Giving someone a terrible nickname after they made a silly mistake is one of the more bizarre tidbits of Viking lore — but it is exactly what Marines still do to one another today. The platoon idiot is "boot," the big guy in the unit is "Pvt Pyle," and you know damn well that certain guy they call "Mad Dog" did something to earn that name.

History speaks of the famed viking warrior named Kolbeinn Butter Penis (named after his sexual exploits) and Eystein Foul-Fart (named for the noxious small that came from his ass). Hell, even Erik the Red got his name because he was a ginger — or because he was a violent sociopath at the age of ten... nobody can say for certain there.

Or the story of Harald "Bluetooth"... because he ate a blueberry that one time.. Yep, Vikings were creative like that.

5. Both believe that the older the fighter, the more terrifying the man

There's an old, anonymous saying that's often attributed to Viking culture:

Beware of an old man in a profession where men usually die young.

The only thing more terrifying than a 47-year-old Master Gunnery Sergeant who's fueled entirely by alcohol, tobacco, and hatred was a 47-year-old, bearded-out berserker who's lived in the woods for the better part of twenty years.

Unlike their contemporaries, Vikings had a special place in their groups for the older warrior men and treated their cumulative knowledge as sacred. Younger Vikings would pick their brains, trying to learn their tactics. And, at the end of the day, the old viking were said to fight even more ferociously in battle, knowing that their time was short. After all, dying sick in bed won't get the Valkyries' attention — only through glorious combat could they earn entry into the hall of Valhalla.

On the topic of Valhalla, Marines hold Tun Tavern with about the same level of respect.

6. Both enjoyed fighting more than anything else

The most glaringly obvious similarity between these two groups of warriors is how sacredly they hold the concept of fighting. Much like a Marine being told their deployment got pushed back a few months, Vikings would complain if they weren't given their time on the battlefield.

Vikings' culture wasn't based entirely on fighting, but man, were they good at it. That's probably why nobody ever talks about the Vikings' expansive trading network. There's also a reason why people never really talk about a Water Dog's "water purification skills."

Ah, vikings. You unruly, blood-thirsty a**holes. Some things never change.

H/T: to Ruddy Cano, U.S. Marine Corps veteran and fellow We Are The Mighty contributor, for helping with this article.