(U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Reportedly, the first treadmills were created in 1818 by an English civil engineer named Sir William Cubitt. He constructed the "tread-wheel" for use in jail — prisoners were placed on the tread-wheel and were used for their cheap labor. Each time the prisoners stepped, their weight would move the mill and pump water out or crush grain.

Today, the tread-wheel is referred to as a "treadmill," and it is still sometimes thought of as a form of punishment as many gym goers push themselves on the machine to burn fat in the gym.

Building a home gym is great for fitness, so many people purchase their own treadmills for private use. It's a way to save money on a gym membership each month, but many people just run out and purchase the classic cardio machine without thoroughly thinking it through.

So we came up with a few things that everyone should consider before investing in this expensive piece of equipment.


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1. Set a budget

Due to how popular treadmills have become for private use, fitness companies design them to fit nearly any budget. Treadmills can cost anywhere between $300 to $8000+ without before taxes or warranties. That's a crazy amount of money to spend on one piece of gym equipment.

When you're ready to purchase a treadmill for your home, it's important you establish a reasonable budget before you even start searching. Although financing fitness equipment is possible through the retailers, it's critical that you set your budget after examining how much you'll use the unit versus getting a gym membership.

Make sure the treadmill will eventually pay for itself or it could be a bad investment.

2. Make at least two trips to the store

The best advice anyone can give on purchasing a treadmill is test the product before you buy it. This might mean taking a few trips to the fitness store and walking on the unit a few times and learning its distinct features. Write down a few treadmill model numbers and research for competitive prices online before swiping your credit card to purchase it.

You could get a few discounts if you competitively shop for your new fitness equipment. Your bank account will thank you later.

3. Confirm where you're putting the unit

It's easy enough to find a location for your treadmill, but there are a few pitfalls to avoid.

First, make sure you measure the space. You're not going to want to move that thing twice, and if it arrives and doesn't fit you'll be sorry.

Second, anticipate future living arrangements. You could regret buying the unit because if you move or rearrange furniture. Treadmills usually find their way to the owner's backyard or garage when that spare bedroom gets repurposed.

4. Evaluate your medical conditions

There's a wide variety of treadmills available on the market, so make sure you understand what type will better fit your medical needs. Some treadmills are equipped with different shock absorbing belts for runners with lower back and knee pain.

There's nothing more annoying than buying an expensive item only to find it's aggravating to use.

5. Understand the warranties

The majority of treadmills on the market run solely on electricity. That said, electronic items are known to break over time from normal wear and tear. Since most pieces of exercise equipment come with a hefty price tag, it's important to understand what damage is covered under the factor and extended warranties.

Factor warranties can cover the product for a period of 30 days, all the way up to a whole year. It's easy to forget when this unique insurance is about to expire as consumers deal with hectic work schedules and family. So, its beneficial to fully understand all the fine print that comes with both types of warranties.

Paying out-of-pocket costs to repair these expensive pieces of cardio machinery can break the bank.

6. Check out the resale value

Walk into any second-hand fitness store or check online for used treadmills. Your eyes will be flooded with the number of treadmills up for resale. It just one of those favorite household items that just gets pushed off the side when its owner decides that aerobic exercise isn't for them.

If you're in the market to buy a brand new treadmill, research the resale value of the other models that fall into the class of machinery that you're about to purchase. You could be losing some significant cash when you put the cardio machine back up on the market later on.

It won't matter how much you paid — interested buyers rarely pay top dollar for second-hand goods.