Military Life

4 tips for corpsmen who want to earn their FMF pins

(Photo by Marine Sgt. Justin J. Shemanski)

It's the goal of almost every young corpsman who enters into their first unit to one day earn a Fleet Marine Force pin. Like everything else in the military, the pin is earned through plenty of hardship and many hours of studying.

The FMF pin itself has a beautiful design. It's an extension of the Marine Corps' Eagle, Globe, and Anchor, adorned with a wave that's crashing onto a beach, signifying the historical sands of Iwo Jima. Two crossed rifles lie behind the globe, symbolizing the rifleman's ethic that this program is designed to instill into sailors assigned to Marine Corps units.

All hail the mighty FMF pin. Semper Fi(Photo by Marine Cpl. Rose A. Muth)

Before a corpsman can proudly wear the badge, each sailor has to prove themselves through a series of written tests and oral boards. These tests are stringent, but we've come up with a few tips to help you navigate your way into earning the beloved pin.


1. Study the manual

When a sailor checks into their first unit, they will receive a thick book full of Marine Corps knowledge that's nearly impossible to memorize. It's a good thing you won't have to.

The information within the manual is divided up into three different sections: the Marine Division (infantry), Marine Logistics Group (supply), and the Marine Air Wing (pilots and sh*t).

Outside of Marine Corps history, all you have to study are the sections that apply to you — which is still a sh*tload.

Sailors with the Ground Combat Element Integrated Task Force listen as their senior Fleet Marine Force corpsmen instruct them on FMF knowledge at the unit's task force aid station.

(Photo by Marine Cpl. Paul S. Martinez)

2. Learn by doing

For many sailors, it's tough to sit down, read from a book, and retain all the information you need to qualify. Many of us learn better by doing. Go through the channels necessary to get your hands on a few weapon systems so you can learn the disassembly and reassembly process. Do this before you go in front of the FMF board.

3. Have your Marines quiz you

Remember how we talked about getting your hands on those weapon systems? Nobody knows those suckers better than the Marines who use them every day. So, when you're with your new brothers, have them put you through a crash course on their gear.

4. Board while on deployment

When you go before the board to earn your pin, you should know everything, inside and out. That being said, most sailors don't pass the board on their first time up.

If you opt to be evaluated stateside, the board will expect you to know everything there is to know, since you're not on deployment and patrolling daily. If you board while on deployment, they usually stick to the basics — you're under enough as it is patrolling the enemies' backyard.

Secondly, studying for your FMF is an excellent way to pass the time — and it gives you a solid goal to accomplish before you pack up and go home. Frankly speaking, getting pinned by your Marine brothers is a great way to end a stressful deployment.

Hospital Corpsman Billy Knight get pinned with his Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist pin by Chief Petty Officer Garry Tossing during a ceremony at Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan.

(Photo by Sgt. Justin Shemanski)