Lists

5 things boots need to do before earning the squad's trust

Squads are the most fundamental part of the military. While you can generally get by with having an issue with someone else in the company, a squad can't function unless everyone is on the same level.

It takes years to earn someone's trust to the point of knowing, without a shadow of a doubt, that they have your back. To get the new guys in the squad up to speed, they'll have to be given a crash course in earning it.


5. PT as well in the morning

the uninitiated may think that the fastest way to earn respect is to out-hustle, out-perform, and outlast the rest. The problem here is that morning PT isn't designed to improve — it's for sustaining one's assumed peak performance. If you're looking to improve, it'll probably happen off-duty.

With that in mind, many troops who've been in for years won't be impressed by the new kid smoking everyone on the pull-up bar. They're probably hungover from drinking the night before. During morning PT, there's no way to improve your standing with the guys, but making everyone else look bad will definitely cost you some points.

There is a difference between impressing the squad and impressing the platoon sergeant. Choose wisely.

(Photo by Spc. Noel Williams)

4. Shoot as good at the range

This rings especially true with line units. It's also assumed that by the time a Drill Instructor hands off a boot to the unit, they're ready to be hardened killing machines. Taking time to train someone to shoot perfectly is no longer in the training schedule, there're still guys who've been in the unit for ages rocking a "pizza box," or Marksman badge.

If you can show everyone that you're not some kid, but rather someone who's ready to train with the big boys, the squad will take notice and use you to belittle the guy who missed the 50m target. That's a good thing for you.

This also means don't ever miss the 50m target — you will be justifiably ridiculed.

(Photo by Sgt. Maj. Peter Breuer)

3. Party as hard in the barracks

Barracks parties are very tight-knit. There may be some cross-over with other platoons or companies that are cool with whomever is hosting, so don't fret and be cool. It's a real sign of trust if someone is willing to show you to the others off-duty.

Chances are that most boots are fresh out of high school. No one wants to party with the kid who's going to get them arrested by the MPs for underage drinking. For all the legal reasons, you really shouldn't be drinking if you're under 21 (even though we all know what happens in the barracks). You can still play a part, however, by being the designated driver or helping others who've drank too much by grabbing water, junk food, and sports drinks.

Or keep an eye out for staff duty and keep them occupied so they don't crash the party.

(Screengrab via YouTube)

2. Joke as witty off-duty

As odd as it sounds, the surefire way to make everyone in the squad trust you is to get them to like you. They'll overlook a lot of your flaws if you're not quite "grunt enough" if you can make them laugh.

No one wants to be around the guy who's telling the same unfunny story that ends with getting yelled at by the drill sergeant. No matter how mind-blowing it was to you back then, I assure you that it's nothing special. Dig deep and find that real humor. Joke about something personal, like the first time you got intimate with someone. There's definitely an awkward moment in there that's funny to reflect on.

Chances are that the joke, just like your first time, will be quickly forgotten by most people involved.

(Photo by Pfc. Vaniah Temple)

1. Be as loyal when the time comes

There's no concrete way to know when this time will come, but it will. At some point, everything will be on the line and you need to swoop in with the clutch. When it happens, you'll know.

This is when you'll show the squad that you're one of them — that you value the rest of the guys above your own well-being. It could be as large as saving everyone's ass from an enraged first sergeant to just bringing an extra pack of cigarettes to the field. Get to know your squad and you'll know what it takes.

I'm just sayin'. Nearly every friendship is sealed in the smoke pit.

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo)