It's always appreciated when civilians go out of their way to thank a veteran, but when veterans look out for each other — even if they've never met — great things can happen. A Vietnam-era sailor could welcome in a Post 9/11-era soldier with open arms. A Desert Storm Marine could go out of their way to aid a Korean War airman. Veterans of all eras are family to all other veterans.

The bond is something that comes from shared experience; serving in the military is unique, both as a life event and as a professional move. Other veterans understand that and can help navigate anything from benefits to healing to hooking a brother up.


1. College classmates

Getting out and using your GI Bill can be an abrupt transition. One moment every detail of your life is dictated to you by Uncle Sam and the next you're surrounded by college kids who're asking if your time in was like Call of Duty. Finding a veteran friend in college makes it at least a little smoother.

In the great unknown of civilian life, vets will stick together as close as if they served together.

Civilians have gotten better about not asking the "have you killed anyone" question but it's never not awkward.

2. Police officers

There are countless veterans who hung up their green uniforms and put on a blue one. Chances are good that the police officer who pulled you over for speeding might also be a veteran. If you play your cards right, they may let you off the hook with just a warning.

Don't ever assume you can play the veteran card at every opportunity, though. If you pull the "well, actually officer, I'm a veteran" move, they still might just thank you for your service and hand you the ticket. You've got to be subtle and let the officer figure it out that you're a veteran or else they'll stare at you like the entitled fool you're being.

Even if they're not a veteran, they still have the same sense of humor as us.

(Bath Township Police Department)

3. Security guards or bouncers

Another common job for the gym rat grunts is to work security, and if you're lucky they just might be working at your favorite bar or club. They won't help you out if you're trespassing but they could probably let you slide through if you're, say, at a concert or waiting in a long line.

If you've got a light sprinkling of veteran on you (like a memorial band, "veteran" on your driver's license, or a shirt that only vets would understand), then they can even slip you into the club without paying a cover.

Don't ruin your friendship with a vet bouncer when a drunk civilian friend opens their mouth.

4. Personal fitness trainers

Getting back into shape is a chore most veterans still keep up with. If they're looking for someone to help give the right push, they can get a personal fitness trainer at a gym. Finding another veteran who became a trainer makes working out so much easier because you can both speak the same language.

Most trainers need to break everything down Barney-style to the people who only ever go to the gym once a year. It's even worse when the civilian gets offended by "verbal motivation." Just clicking back to NCO mode will benefit both of you.

...or so I've been told.

5. Retail workers

Let's be realistic. Not every veteran gets out and becomes millionaire beer tasters, bikini model judges, or woodsmen. Some end up in the service industry to help pay the never ending stream of bills. Finding another veteran when your usual clientele raise hell and demand to speak to the manager makes life so much easier.

Spark up a normal human conversation with them. Be friendly. They may even let you use their discount or toss you a free meal.

6. Bar-goers

Back in the barracks, it was a 24/7 party. Booze flowed freely and our tip top shape bodies were able to make the hangovers less severe. Fast forward many years down the line and the same vets will frequent their local bars.

Spark up a conversation with a vet and you'll quickly make a friend. Chances are that the other vet will buy your next round just for being a brother.

Many years out and even the old-timers can hang with the young troops.

7. Potential bosses

If there's any one person you want to have on your side immediately is the person hiring you for a position. If they notice on your resume that you're also a veteran and can back up whatever you wrote on it, you're golden.

The civilian workplace is very much a "good 'ol boy" system that relies on who you know rather than what you know. Getting that leg up on everyone else is going to take you far.