NEWS
Article by Rosie Perper
(FBI photo)

New insight to ISIS found in a fighter's captured diary

A notebook written in English that may have belonged to an ISIS fighter was reportedly found in a jail in Raqqa, according to the National, which exclusively obtained the notebook from an unnamed source.

The notebook reportedly details the inner workings of the militant group, including their future plans, military shortcomings, and issues foreign fighters faced within the group.


According to pictures of the purported notebook provided by the National, the pages appear to be written in English by one author who used American spelling of words and numbers. A second author wrote in French, and Arabic was used in some of the text as well.

The author details ISIS's core strategies for maintaining control in the region.

On one page, the author describes how to prevent defectors from leaving ISIS territory: "We should push civilians who want to flee to our centers of gravity in Mosul and Raqqa." The author added: "The enemy might try to break our control over an area and allow civilians to escape."

Hidden camera footage of what life was like under ISIS control in Raqqa.

The notebook describes a solution, written in large letters "THE BIG SOLUTION" which explains that ISIS should not use "conventional military power against a much stronger foe," and suggests the group focus on "insurgency" until their "political situation allows for a more conventional approach."

Another page compares several types of guns and their cost in dollars using hand drawn pictures.

The author also discusses expanding efforts to other countries, including Saudi Arabia. A page reportedly questions: "How to make Saudi like Syria? Can we get people to hate Their [sic] rulers?"

The author continues: "Mecca and Medina are a priority for the [caliphate] to actually influence world Muslims. But to get there we need to destabilize Al-Saud. Direct action against Al-Saud from Iraq will likely fail militarily and attract US ground troops so the best way to do this is internally, with the support for Yemen and Iraq."

The writings also appear to show that ISIS fighters kept up with international news, and often monitored global political cycles.

The author offers suggestions on how to pull "the USA to another major war to exhaust its economy." The writer also extensively followed the US presidential elections, and said key decisions would depend on US political action.

"The US decisions are very important, and they depend on the Presidential elections."

Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign. (Photo by Gage Skidmore)

"However, if democrats lose, a Republican administration would be more likely to bring US boots on the ground, and cooperation with Iran will likely stop," the author reportedly wrote.

The journal also reportedly layed out a strategy for confronting the US on the battlefield: "Fighting the USA might be more dangerous militarily, but it will grant IS respect in muslim [sic] eyes."

The notebook also reveals the innermost thoughts of what appears to have been a foreign ISIS fighter. At the bottom of a page detailing "important" military issues "to study," the author asks himself: "Who am I? What should I do? Why am I here? How did I reach this place?"

According to the report, the author bemoans several limitations within the group, including lack of training time to militant fighters and notes there were "problems created by different languages."

Associate Professor at the Naval War College Monterey, Dr. Craig Whiteside, told the National that there were notable similarities between the strategies laid out in the book and the strategies taught in western military training.

"The author has studied topics we study in a war college, such as the differences between policy and strategy."

"If this is a foreign fighter, not studying their own country for military facilities but instead learning about Iraq and Syria, the goal is to encourage them to stay," he added.

Figures from October 2017 show more than 40,000 fighters from more than 110 countries flocked to Syria and Iraq after its establishment in 2014. Reports indicate that roughly 129 US nationals joined the caliphate. Of those foreign fighters, at least 5,600 citizens or residents from 33 countries who have returned home.

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