Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11 - We Are The Mighty
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Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Never-before-seen photos reveal the Bush administration’s shocked reactions to the September 11th attacks, moments after the towers were struck.


Each image depicts the crushing gravity of that fateful day, as reflected in the eyes of President George W. Bush, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, CIA Director George Tenet and many other White House staffers.

The photos were released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request from journalist Neirouz Hanna of PBS Frontline. The photos were taken by the vice president’s staff photographer.

You can see more of the recently-released photos on Flickr, and our selection of photographs below:

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Vice President Cheney watches television Photo: The U.S. National Archives

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
CIA Director George Tenet listens to President Bush’s address in the President’s Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) Photo: The U.S. National Archives

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
President Bush with Vice President Cheney and Senior Staff in the President’s Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) Photo: The U.S. National Archives

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Vice President Cheney in the President’s Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) Photo: The U.S. National Archives

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
President Bush with Vice President Cheney and Senior Staff in the President’s Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) Photo: The U.S. National Archives

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Secretary of State Colin Powell in the President’s Emergency Operations Center (PEOC) Photo: The U.S. National Archives

NOW: World War II vet recounts pulling a bullet out of his wrist with his teeth

Intel

This classic spy plane can’t land safely without a car driving behind it at 140 mph

The US Lockheed U-2 Spy plane is arguably one of the most capable platforms in the sky, but it needs backup when it comes in for a landing.


With only two wheels, the aircraft is incredibly unsteady when it touches down, and pilots have their hands full during the entire landing process.

The solution? Send a back-up pilot to trail the plane in a car while offering control inputs. The ground pilot can reach speeds around 140 mph while attempting to keep up with the aircraft. And without his help the plane could ground loop or worse.

Yes, it is as insane as it sounds.

Check out the video below to see a U-2 in action:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2tnCDBkIoI

 

NOW: Hilarious robot fails show why you shouldn’t worry about ‘Terminator’ just yet

OR: Here’s how the military takes civilian tech and makes it more awesome

Articles

This is the deadliest airplane ever, period, end of discussion

In the 1950s, Lockheed Martin designed the C-130 with transport in mind, by the end of the 1960s, Boeing converted the lumbering giant into one of the deadliest aircraft in the world. Its endurance and capacity to carry munitions made it the perfect AC-47 Spooky gunship replacement.


Related: This monster aircraft was the helicopter version of the AC-130 gunship

Like the AC-47, the new, AC-130 was capable of flying faster and higher than helicopters, and its excellent loiter time allowed it to deliver concentrated fire to a single target on the ground. The gunship first saw action during the Vietnam War and has continued to receive updates. The newest version of the gunship, the AC-130U Spectre, uses the latest sensor technologies and fire control systems to improve range and accuracy.

This video perfectly shows why Boeing received an $11.4 million indefinite contract by the U.S. Air Force. Watch it now:

Video: American Heroes Channel, YouTube

Articles

These 3 soldiers fought their way back to the front lines after losing legs

Typically, an amputation ends a military career. For a long time, most any level of amputation was considered to make a service member unfit for combat. As of last summer, only 57 amputees had returned to conflict zones and most of those stayed at a desk.


These three men wanted to get back into the fight.

1. The Ranger who swore he’d still be a squad leader

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Photo: US Army Special Operations Command

Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Kapacziewski was in an armored vehicle when insurgents threw a grenade into it. Kapacziewski survived the blast with serious injuries. After months of surgeries and casts, he attempted to walk on his right leg again and heard the pins holding it together snap. Soon after, he asked doctors to remove it.

Also, watch: Bryan Anderson’s Amazing Story Showcased in ‘American Sniper’ 

Over the months and years that followed, Kapacziewski (a.k.a. “Joe Kap”) relearned how to do the basic tasks required of Rangers . He ran, rucked, parachuted, and completed Army drills with his prosthetic leg. Since his amputation, he has conducted four combat deployments and even earned an Army Commendation Medal for pulling an injured soldier 75 yards during a firefight.

2. The paratrooper who led an airborne platoon with a prosthetic

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Photo: US Navy Lt. j.g. Bryan Mitchell

1st Lt. Josh Pitcher finished relieving himself on the side of the road, closed his fly, and heard the loud pop of a small roadside bomb. Two days later, he was in a hospital in Germany, promising to return to combat despite losing his left leg beneath the knee. Before he could even try and return to active duty, Pitcher had to kick a pill and drinking habit he got trying to deal with the pain after his surgeries. But, he learned how to do his old job with his new leg. Less than two years after his injury, he returned with his unit, the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, to Afghanistan. A few months later, he took over a 21-man platoon and led them for the rest of the deployment, most of it trudging through the mountains in the northern regions of the country .

3. The captain who calmly reported his own double amputation

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11
Photo: US Army SGT Joe Padula

When then-1st Lt. Daniel Luckett’s vehicle was hit by an IED in Iraq in 2008, a squad leader called up to ask if everything was all right. Luckett calmly responded, “Negative. My feet are gone.” Two years later, Capt. Luckett was with the 101st Airborne Division again; this time in Afghanistan. He uses a small prosthetic to assist what remains of his right leg. A much larger one serves as his left. His second day with his first prosthetic, he attempted to walk away with the leg. Doctors tried to get it back, but Luckett convinced them to let him keep it. He would go on to earn the Expert Infantry Badge during his efforts to prove he was still an asset. After successfully earning the award, the soldier was promoted to captain and allowed to deploy with his unit as part of the Afghan surge.

Intel

For years ‘The Daily Show’ host Jon Stewart has given veterans their big showbiz breaks

Although “The Daily Show” host Jon Stewart pulls no punches when talking foreign policy, specifically that which pertains to the war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, he’s a strong supporter of the people serving in the military. When American Corporate Partners approached him about mentoring a veteran, he responded by creating the Veteran Immersion Program and taking on 24 veterans instead of one, according to ACP.


The program is a five-week boot camp for veterans looking to break into the entertainment industry. Participants learn first hand about the technical and creative opportunities that exist by working at The Daily Show. The program ends with a career fair with over twenty influential production organizations.

Even though Jon Stewart is ending his run with “The Daily Show,” rumor has it that he’s just getting started with helping veterans.

In the meantime, this video hosted by our very own August Dannehl and Veteran Immersion Program alumni shows the impact the program has had on those who’ve attended.

Watch:

NOW: This Navy veteran went behind the scenes of ‘The Daily Show’ with Jon Stewart

OR: 5 times when Jon Stewart made a difference for America’s veterans

Intel

This music video just raised the bar for all military music parodies

Made on a budget of $0, the Annapolis midshipmen’s version of Mark Ronson’s “Uptown Funk” featuring Bruno Mars is the most polished military music parody to date. The cast and crew consist entirely of midshipmen, and it perfectly captures the joy of being on liberty. The crew even managed to mashup Anchors Away into the funky tune, listen closely around 3:00 of the video.


Watch the hilarious video below:

(Naptown Funk, YouTube)
Intel

4 reasons why you shouldn’t give candy to kids while on patrol

The idea of winning hearts and minds dates back decades. Higher command believes that if allied forces do favors for and give material gifts to the enemy, they’ll be influenced by the acts of kindness and, perhaps, change their way of thinking.


Since that plan rarely works, many ground troops will appeal to the enemies’ children, thinking they can steer them over to the good side while they’re impressionable. In America, the idea of strange men giving candy to little kids is reprehensible, but on deployment, it’s cool.

However, in a country like Afghanistan, where most of the population is dirt poor, little kids have no problem with walking up to a patrol and asking an infantryman for “chocolate,” which means they’ll take any candy you have.

Sure, the kids usually have good intentions, but there are a few reasons why you shouldn’t give them those sugary snacks from your MRE.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Lance Cpl. Randy B. Lake talks to some children during a foot patrol.

(Photo by Marine Cpl. Adam C. Schnell)

It might piss off their parents

Some Afghan parents don’t want their kids socializing with American troops because they don’t want the bad guys to see it happening — or they just flat-out hate America.

The last thing a grunt wants to hear is a potential Taliban member screaming at them.

What if the kids have allergies?

Some kids are allergic to chocolate, coconuts, or peanuts — and you can be sure that they won’t read the nutritional facts to see what’s in the small treat you gave them. Most of the kids think all candy is called chocolate and they want that piece you have stowed away in your cargo pocket. Once they get it, they just pop it in their mouth.

If they eat that bite-sized Snickers bar you gave them, suddenly go into anaphylactic shock, and their airway closes, you’ve just made the local populous even more pissed off than they already are at you for being in their country.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

It’s hard to learn a little trust, but easy to place an explosive in a poorly placed dump pouch.

A friendship going bad

Grunts are people, too, and they have one or two strands humanity floating around in their bloodstreams — somewhere. Frequently, the infantryman will notice a little kid who reminds him of someone back home. In this moment, they might “bro down” a little and give them some candy.

However, Marines wear dump pouches that they use to put things in, like empty magazines or extra bottles of water. There could be a time where their new little friend sneaks up to them, discreetly steals something out of the dump pouch (or puts a ticking grenade in there) and takes off running.

That troop could die because he trusted that little sh*t. We’re speaking from experience here.

They might sell it for drugs

Countless kids we encountered on patrol while in Afghanistan were high off their asses. They were entertaining as hell, yes, but doped out of their minds. It’s possible that the piece of candy you gave them was what they need to sell to get the cash to buy their next fix.

We could put a photo of some Afghan kids getting lit below, but this article isn’t supposed to depress anyone… right?

Intel

This crew tried to drift their tank but rolled it instead

At the Tank Biathlon currently going on in Russia, top crews are driving great tanks through maneuvers, demonstrations, and competitive events. Apparently, one Kuwaiti crew decided to one-up everyone by drifting a T-72 around a turn.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WriPgJFslyY

The T-72 is a fine tank, but it isn’t a drifter. Instead, the tank rolls nearly all the way over. Someone is likely going to have an awkward talk with his commander when he gets back to Kuwait.

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Intel

6 ways to signal for help if you’re lost in the woods

We’ve all heard the stories of people who get stranded out in the middle of nowhere and go to some crazy lengths to survive. Since most people don’t prepare for getting get stuck out in the elements, they typically don’t bring a complete collection of survival gear with them.

If you find yourself marooned somewhere that doesn’t get cell-phone service and you’re unable to contact a lifeline, things start to get a little stressful. Luckily, most people have enough materials either on their person or nearby to send out a signal that just might save their life.


Send out smoke signals

This is probably the most universally known last-ditch-effort signal to send to rescue crews. Smoke can billow up and be seen for miles. Since you’re using a fire source to create the smoke, always keep your surroundings in mind. Yes, you want to be rescued, but don’t burn down the forest around you to do it. It can get real dangerous real quick.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Ground-to-air signals

Unfortunately, this type of signal is best when the material you use to spell out a message is nearly the opposite shade of the material on which it lays. After all, you don’t want to distress signal to become camouflaged with the environment. That will kill any hope of being located.

Make any message short and big. Writing “SOS” is the most popular and is widely recognized.

Water dye

Most of the population enjoys a relaxing day, chilling on a boat as it sails in a large body of water. But what if you’re out in the ocean and that boat sinks? Should that terrible event come to life, most boats are outfitted with survival cases, containing extra water, some rations, and dye used to signal overhead planes.

Typically, the dye is a bright-green color, which contrasts greatly with dark seawater. The dye is dissolves bit by bit, creating a trail that leads to the boat or life preserver as it drifts.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Eye-level ground markers

Since you can’t be everywhere at once to spot incoming rescue, creating eye-level ground markers is a great idea. Even in your absence, these are clear indicators that someone’s around.

The eye-level tags can be clothes or any other material as long as it stands out against the surroundings.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Whistles

Sounds travel fast and far, but yelling for long periods is rough on your throat. If you just so happen to have a whistle in your car or in your pocket, that’s great. Since you probably don’t, you can construct a temporary one by cutting out a wedge in a hollow piece of wood.

Never-before-seen photos show Bush administration officials right after 9/11

Aim right for the eyes.

Reflect light with a mirror

Extremely bright lights can be seen from several miles away. Now, you can’t generate generate a light as bright as that fiery ball in the sky, but you sure can reflect that f*cker. Using a mirror or a makeup compact you can reflect and redirect the sun’s rays to capture a rescuer’s attention from afar.

It’s literally that simple.

Intel

This riveting animated short reveals the complexities of war

“Confusion Through Sand” tells the story of a young infantryman confronted by overwhelming conflict when he’s sent to a small, sandy village. Scared and alone, he has to fight his way out of an ambush.


The nine-minute short reveals the confusion of war from the warfighter’s perspective. It explores the spectrum of haze experienced by today’s soldiers in the desert, interpreting what happens when training encounters circumstances beyond the realm of human control.

The story is on the ground and under the helmet of a 19-year-old infantryman, according to the video’s Kickstarter campaign.

Watch:

NOW: Iraq war vet relives his most intense gunfight

OR: This beautifully animated video shows tow WWII pilots fighting all the way to Hell

Intel

The second season of the incredibly popular ‘Serial’ podcast may focus on Bowe Bergdahl

The second season of the incredibly popular “Serial” podcast produced by NPR will focus on the Bowe Bergdahl case, The Hollywood Reporter is confirming.


The Bergdahl case has attracted plenty of interest nationwide, following the soldier’s release from Haqqani Network captivity in exchange for five Taliban detainees. The Army sergeant is currently facing charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy at his court-martial after he allegedly walked away from his combat outpost in 2009.

Bergdahl’s attorneys claim he was trying to reach a nearby base to report troubling conditions in his unit, while many soldiers he served with believe him to be a deserter responsible for lives that were lost while they searched for him.

Via Maxim:

All of this is ripe material for Serial host Sarah Koenig’s Rashomon approach to investigative journalism, which she deftly applied to the case of Adnan Syed, a man currently serving a life sentence for the 1999 murder of his high school ex-girlfriend, Hae Min Lee.

Koenig went to great lengths to examine the case from every possible angle—interviewing witnesses whose testimonies were never heard in court, and pursuing other leads abandoned during the investigation that led to Syed’s conviction.

First debuted in 2014, the “Serial” podcast quickly rocketed to the top spot as the most popular podcast of all time. According to Maxim’s reporting, reporters from “Serial” have been seen inside the courtroom at Bergdahl’s trial.

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Intel

Army-Navy Spirit Video: ‘As Long As We Got Our SDBs’

One of the greatest rivalries in college football is Army vs. Navy. And Midshipman Rylan Tuohy has stepped up the game.


Whether on the field or cheering their teams along, both Army and Navy take winning this particular game very seriously. And the rivals are calling each other out through clever videos such as Rylan’s Suit and Tie parody. Six points to Navy for this one. Rylan is just as talented a singer as he is a United States Naval Academy midshipman.