Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly - We Are The Mighty
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Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

The Air Force took steps to relax the military’s current stance on transgender men and women serving in uniform earlier this month, by requiring a higher authority to authorize discharges for enlisted transgender airmen and airmen who have been diagnosed with gender dysphoria, according to a news release.


Openly transgender Senior Airman Logan Ireland hopes that this decision will eventually allow transgender servicemen and women to serve openly without the risk of involuntary separation, despite the fact that the Air Force policy itself has not changed .

Ireland joined the Air Force as a woman in 2010, and was featured in “Transgender, at War and in Love,” a documentary short exploring his relationship with fiancee and transgender soldier Laila Villanueva.

Ireland told Air Force Times:

“Day in and day out, you’re constantly worried about a discharge…so every day when I put on my boots and strap on my gun and duty belt, I’m at risk for a discharge — and that’s the least of my worries in my personal job. No one should have to worry about that day in and day out. “

For more, read the full article at AFT

Check out “Transgender, at War and in Love” below:

NOW:  A female Airman pushes back against USAF sexual harassment training

OR: New report shows vets more civic-minded than non-vets

Intel

The F-35 Can’t Carry Its Most Advanced Weapon Until 2022

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Photo: Lockheed Martin


Lockheed Martin’s F-35B variant has hit yet another snag which could seriously impact the aircraft’s overall ability to strike at ground targets.

Now, the fifth-generation aircraft will be unable to carry the military’s latest and most advanced munitions for awhile.

Also Read: 17 Signs That You Might Be A Military Aviator

Due to a design oversight, the internal weapon’s bay of the F-35B is too small to carry the required load of the new Small Diameter Bomb II (SDB II), Inside Defense reports, citing the Pentagon’s F-35 Joint Program Office. The SDB II is a next-generation precision-strike bomb that was meant to dovetail with the F-35 program.

The F-35B was designed to carry eight SDB IIs inside the internal weapons bay. These bombs would allow the F-35 pilot to target eight points from 40 miles away and with complete precision. The SDB IIs can also change course in-flight to follow moving targets through laser or infrared guidance systems, according to Foxtrot Alpha.

However, the F-35B can only fit four of the required bombs in its weapons bay. The F-35B variant has a significantly smaller internal bay than the F-35A and F-35C due to the aircraft’s design as a short-takeoff-vertical-landing aircraft.

Inside Defense reports that the “Navy initially wanted to field the SDB II first on the F-35B/C but is instead bringing forward integration with the F/A-18 Super Hornet. The SDB II is an F-35 Block 4 software capability and the release of that software load has been pushed back to FY-22.”

In other words, because the SDB II is included with the weapon Block 4 upgrade for the F-35, the aircraft is now likely to not field the new munitions until 2022.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
F/A-18C releasing a laser-guided bomb. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

F-35 spokesman Joe DellaVedova confirmed to Inside Defense that the SDB II problem has been known since 2007 and the more difficult changes to the aircraft have already been made in order to allow it to field the munitions.

“We’ve been working with the SDB II program office and their contractors since 2007,” DellaVedova said. “The fit issues have been known and documented and there were larger and more substantial modifications needed to support SDB II that have already been incorporated into production F-35 aircraft.”

The F-35B variant is the Marine Corps model of the plane and 34 aircraft have already been delivered to the branch. The delay in implementing the SDB II will not affect the aircraft’s ability to fly but will limit the operations that the F-35B will be able to effectively carry out.

More from Business Insider:

This article originally appeared at Business Insider Defense Copyright 2015. Follow BI Defense on Twitter.

Intel

BUMMER: Rambo isn’t going to fight against ISIS in his next movie

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly


Sylvester Stallone’s character of “Rambo” is not going fight against ISIS in an upcoming movie, despite recent reports of that possibility.

A slew of reports circulated in the media that “Rambo: Last Blood” would feature the Vietnam Special Forces hero reprising his role to fight against ISIS terrorists, but a rep completely denied it, according to Rolling Stone. The reports cited comments that Stallone purportedly made at Comic-Con 2015, except there was a big problem: He wasn’t even there.

“Sylvester Stallone did not attend Comic-Con 2015, and consequently there was no official remark from him regarding Rambo made there at the event,” a rep told RS. “This is not an accurate report.”

“Rambo: Last Blood” was originally expected to begin filming last year or early this year, but it was delayed, according to Business Insider.

Come on John Rambo. We need you.

Read the full story at Rolling Stone

Intel

Russia is trolling US troops with fake Facebook profiles of gorgeous women

When Russian President Vladimir Putin visited the studios of state-owned media outlet Russia Today in 2013, he reportedly instructed them to break “the Anglo-Saxon monopoly on global information streams.”


It appears he has not forgotten that goal.

Politico reported on Monday that Russian hackers have been posing as attractive women and friending US troops on Facebook to gather intelligence about the military.

These actions are part of a larger Russian strategy aimed at manipulating and extracting intelligence from the US military.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
The U.S. military’s online behavior campaign is used to highlight the importance of appropriate conduct online and social media behavior to help eradicate bullying, exploitation and degradation of fellow service members. (Graphic Illustration by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kegan E. Kay/Released)

Russia seems to be infiltrating the social media accounts of US troops for at least two reasons, according to Politico.

One, it allows Russia to better glean the activities of the US military through what its troops post online. “Spies understand that a great deal can be discerned about what militaries are up to based on the unclassified behavior of soldiers,” John Bambenek, of Fidelis Cybersecurity, told Politico.

Two, it gives them the chance to make US troops sympathize with Russia by inserting propaganda into their news feeds.

For example, former military contractor Serena Moring told Politico she noticed US service members sharing a link about a Russian soldier who heroically died while fighting ISIS in Syria.

According to the Pravda report, the Russian soldier supposedly called in an airstrike on himself while surrounded by ISIS militants, telling his command, “I don’t want them to take me and parade me, conduct the airstrike, they will make a mockery of me and this uniform. I want to die with dignity and take all these bastards with me.”

While the veracity of the story is unknown, Moring told Politico that US soldiers were sharing it with admiration.

“All of the response from the military guys was like, ‘That is awesome. That’s an epic way to die,'” she told Politico. “It was a very soldier-to-soldier bond that was created through social media.”

Russia is employing these hybrid warfare tactics against many Baltic states as well.

According to the 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, hybrid warfare are “activities conducted to enable a resistance movement or insurgency to coerce, disrupt, or overthrow a government or occupying power by operating through or with an underground, auxiliary, or guerrilla force in a denied area.”

In fact, Kyiv recently outlawed Russian social media sites, which Ukrainian officials said were being used to spread propaganda. Human Rights Watch, however, accused Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko of trying to curb freedom of expression.

Intel

How battle drills can be explained through a night of drinking

There are many clever ways to remember stuff from the Army’s study guide. “Low Flying Pilots Eat Tacos,” for example, is a great mnemonic for remembering the first 5 lines of your 9-line medevac. “Sergeant Major Eats Sugar Cookies” is a great one for trying to remember your operation orders. But there isn’t really accepted one for remembering the battle drills. So, instead of a goofy mnemonic, think of the 8 battle drills as the 8 stages of drinking at a bar with your buddies.


For the sake of brevity, we’re only covering battle drills at the platoon level. They’re the same in theory, but the designations are different for squad-level drills. And of course, there’s much more to each battle drill, this is just about remembering the basics.

Battle Drill 1: Platoon attack

Or, when you and your boys are headed out.

You guys are finally headed out. From here on out, you move as a single unit, you stay together as a single unit. Group up and head out. After all, fighting and drinking are the two greatest things an infantryman can do!

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 2: React to contact

Or, getting to the bar.

All the sights and sounds are coming at you at once. Bunker down in a spot that can serve you well — you may be there for a while.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 3: Break contact

Or, moving around the bar.

There’s no such thing as retreat. You need to scout out a new spot and get there quick. If your boys see a better spot, follow them to it.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 4: React to ambush

Or, you’re approached by someone you’re interested in, but you’re drunk.

You’re caught in the kill zone. You don’t want to stay in a place where you’re weak. Reposition yourself to give yourself the edge.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Never leave a fallen comrade. Your boy may need a wingman. (Photo by Spc. L’Erin Wynn)

Battle Drill 5: Knock out bunkers

Or, when you’re trying to use the bathroom.

You observe where you want to “go” and wait until your perfect moment to strike — or take a piss.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 6: Enter building/clear room

Or, coming home drunk off your ass.

You need to enter the doorway as soon as you can and get out of the kill zone. Be careful, if you or one of your boys is married, you might run into some “heat” for coming in at this hour.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 7: Enter/clear a trench

Or, trying to curl up into bed.

Keep a low profile. You can adjust, but keep your eyes on the enemy (or the toilet, in case you have to hurl).

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Battle Drill 8: Conduct initial breach of a mined obstacle

Or, dealing with a hangover.

The key is to deal with this one slow and steady — no quick movements. Don’t do anything too stupid and let other people (breach team or EOD) handle it.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Or just avoid doing anything. That works too. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Armando Limon)

Intel

4 reasons why you shouldn’t give candy to kids while on patrol

The idea of winning hearts and minds dates back decades. Higher command believes that if allied forces do favors for and give material gifts to the enemy, they’ll be influenced by the acts of kindness and, perhaps, change their way of thinking.


Since that plan rarely works, many ground troops will appeal to the enemies’ children, thinking they can steer them over to the good side while they’re impressionable. In America, the idea of strange men giving candy to little kids is reprehensible, but on deployment, it’s cool.

However, in a country like Afghanistan, where most of the population is dirt poor, little kids have no problem with walking up to a patrol and asking an infantryman for “chocolate,” which means they’ll take any candy you have.

Sure, the kids usually have good intentions, but there are a few reasons why you shouldn’t give them those sugary snacks from your MRE.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

Lance Cpl. Randy B. Lake talks to some children during a foot patrol.

(Photo by Marine Cpl. Adam C. Schnell)

It might piss off their parents

Some Afghan parents don’t want their kids socializing with American troops because they don’t want the bad guys to see it happening — or they just flat-out hate America.

The last thing a grunt wants to hear is a potential Taliban member screaming at them.

What if the kids have allergies?

Some kids are allergic to chocolate, coconuts, or peanuts — and you can be sure that they won’t read the nutritional facts to see what’s in the small treat you gave them. Most of the kids think all candy is called chocolate and they want that piece you have stowed away in your cargo pocket. Once they get it, they just pop it in their mouth.

If they eat that bite-sized Snickers bar you gave them, suddenly go into anaphylactic shock, and their airway closes, you’ve just made the local populous even more pissed off than they already are at you for being in their country.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

It’s hard to learn a little trust, but easy to place an explosive in a poorly placed dump pouch.

A friendship going bad

Grunts are people, too, and they have one or two strands humanity floating around in their bloodstreams — somewhere. Frequently, the infantryman will notice a little kid who reminds him of someone back home. In this moment, they might “bro down” a little and give them some candy.

However, Marines wear dump pouches that they use to put things in, like empty magazines or extra bottles of water. There could be a time where their new little friend sneaks up to them, discreetly steals something out of the dump pouch (or puts a ticking grenade in there) and takes off running.

That troop could die because he trusted that little sh*t. We’re speaking from experience here.

They might sell it for drugs

Countless kids we encountered on patrol while in Afghanistan were high off their asses. They were entertaining as hell, yes, but doped out of their minds. It’s possible that the piece of candy you gave them was what they need to sell to get the cash to buy their next fix.

We could put a photo of some Afghan kids getting lit below, but this article isn’t supposed to depress anyone… right?

Intel

Enlisted women are going to serve on Navy submarines for the first time ever

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Female sailors visit USS Ohio Photo: Flickr


The U.S. Navy is now recruiting enlisted servicewomen to serve on submarines in 2016.

This move will take the 2011 decision to integrate female officers into the submarine force one step further, assigning female chief petty officers and senior petty officers to co-ed crews.

Navy officers are reportedly optimistic about the transition process — even despite a video-taped shower scandal that took place aboard the USS Wyoming — one of the first subs to be assigned female officers in late 2011.

For more on this story, check out military.com

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Intel

NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter carries a piece of the Wright Flyer

NASA announced its target date for the first powered, controlled helicopter flight on Mars as no earlier than April 8, 2021. The 4-pound helicopter, named Ingenuity, is attached to the belly of the Mars Perseverance rover which landed on the Red Planet on February 18, 2021. Perseverance is en route to a designated “airfield” where Ingenuity will attempt the historic flight. Upon successful deployment, Ingenuity will have 30 Martian days (equivalent to 31 Earth days) for its test flight campaign.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Engineers prep the Ingenuity helicopter for its trip to Mars (NASA)

“When NASA’s Sojourner rover landed on Mars in 1997, it proved that roving the Red Planet was possible and completely redefined our approach to how we explore Mars. Similarly, we want to learn about the potential Ingenuity has for the future of science research,” said Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division. “Aptly named, Ingenuity is a technology demonstration that aims to be the first powered flight on another world and, if successful, could further expand our horizons and broaden the scope of what is possible with Mars exploration.”

Powered, controlled flight on Mars is significantly more difficult than it is on Earth. The Red Planet’s gravitational pull is about one-third of Earth’s and its atmosphere is 1% of what Earth’s is at the surface. Additionally, the surface of the planet receives only half the amount of solar energy that the Earth receives during the day. Conversely, Martian nights can be as cold as -130°F which poses a serious danger to exposed electrical components.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Ingenuity stowed onboard the Perseverance rover on the surface of Mars (NASA)

Luckily, the engineers at NASA have designed Ingenuity specifically for the Martian skies. The helicopter had to be small and lightweight in order to hitch a ride on Perseverance. Engineers also fitted it with internal heaters to keep it from freezing during the night. To test its capabilities, Ingenuity’s systems were subjected to performance trials in vacuum chambers and test labs in NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory which simulated the conditions the helicopter would face on Mars.

“Every step we have taken since this journey began six years ago has been uncharted territory in the history of aircraft,” said Bob Balaram, JPL’s Mars Helicopter chief engineer. “And while getting deployed to the surface will be a big challenge, surviving that first night on Mars alone, without the rover protecting it and keeping it powered, will be an even bigger one.”

When Ingenuity attempts its historic flight on Mars, it will carry another piece of aviation history with it. On December 17, 1903 the first powered, controlled flight took place on Earth. On the dunes of Kill Devil Hill near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville Wright flew 120 feet in 12 seconds at the controls of Wright Flyer. He was joined by his brother, Wilbur. The Wright brothers made a total of four flights that day, each longer than the last.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Seconds into the first powered, controlled airplane flight in history by the Wright brothers (Public Domain)

A piece of the material that covered the Wright Flyer’s wing is now carried aboard Ingenuity. The small swatch of fabric is wrapped around a cable with insulative tape underneath the helicopter’s solar panel. Another piece of Wright Flyer material was carried by the Apollo 11 crew on their historic flight to the Moon in July 1969. The astronauts also brought a splinter of wood from the Wright Flyer with them.

“Ingenuity is an experimental engineering flight test – we want to see if we can fly at Mars,” said MiMi Aung, project manager for Ingenuity Mars Helicopter. “There are no science instruments onboard and no goals to obtain scientific information. We are confident that all the engineering data we want to obtain both on the surface of Mars and aloft can be done within this 30-sol window.” Stay tuned to NASA’s social media for updates on Ingenuity’s historic flight.

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
An illustration of the Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter on Mars (NASA)
Intel

This video shows the awesome capabilities of Russia’s elite Spetsnaz troops

Much like U.S. special operations forces, Russia has its own elite troops that shine during special missions like counterterrorism and hostage rescue.


“Spetsnaz,” or special purpose, is an umbrella term for special ops in Russia and other eastern Bloc states. These elite troops traditionally fall under the GRU [intelligence service], FSB [security service], and other ministries, in addition to the traditional military structure.

Regardless, they are the “core of the best trained men the Soviet Union, now the Russian Federation, could produce,” according to SOFREP.

In this video, we get a sense of what these troops are capable of. Though it is worth pointing out that this was produced in Russia and isn’t exactly an impartial look at this force.

Watch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1fY8lblBlQ

NOW: 13 famous rock stars who served in the military

Intel

This Dying Vietnam Veteran Is Giving Away Everything He Owns To Charity

Bob Karlstrand, a 65-year-old Vietnam veteran with cancer and a terminal lung disease, is giving away all of his possessions to charity, NBC affiliate KARE 11 reported last week.


Also Read: One Of America’s Most Elite Universities Is Helping Veterans In A Unique way

“I’ve had a good life, so I can’t complain at all,” he told KARE 11.

As an only child who never married or had any children, Karlstrand has no heirs to leave his belongings to. Everything in his home has been donated to members of the community, including his $1 million retirement fund to the school he graduated from.

“The school receives many gifts. This one is just deeply touching,” said Connie White Delaney, dean of the University of Minnesota Nursing School. The donation provided six scholarships this year and more to come.

His home of 38 years will be donated to Habitat for Humanity, which will find a new owner after he passes. Karlstrand’s only requirement for the charity is that the new owner be a military veteran like himself. “I wanted to give back to the veterans if I could,” Karlstrand said.

Watch the full interview:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XTj8zU7MJM

NOW: Aaron Rodgers Surprises Four Kids Whose Dads Died While Serving In The Military

AND: Watch This Iraqi War Veteran’s Tragic Story Told Through The Lense Of A Cartoon

Intel

A Russian weather girl gave a forecast for bombing runs in Syria

Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly


In a story that should have most certainly been Duffel Blog but is actually real-life, a Russian weather forecaster proclaimed the skies over Syria were perfect “flying weather” for Russian jets bombing rebel positions, The Guardian reported.

“Experts say the timing for [the airstrikes] was chosen very well in terms of weather,” Ekaterina Grigorova said in her report for Rossiya 24 on Sunday, according to The Washington Post.

The Russian military has carried out more than 100 sorties in Syria since its aerial campaign began last week. Moscow has claimed it has been bombing militants affiliated with ISIS, but so far strikes have overwhelmingly targeted anti-Assad and Kurdish forces instead.

“In these meteorological conditions, planes can dive below the clouds and conduct effective strikes on ground targets, and only climb higher if there’s active anti-aircraft fire,” Grigorova said in front of a graphic depicting a Sukhoi Su-24 strike aircraft dropping bombs on an enemy tank from the “optimal height for targeting and bombing” of three to five kilometers off the ground, according to the translation from The Guardian.

Here’s the Russian-language report:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmM7YD8cBS8

Check out the full story at the Washington Post

Intel

Marine Corps finally adopts the M4 as its main rifle

After years of “Will they, won’t they?” the Marine Corps finally made it official with their main squeeze, the M4 Carbine. It’s the new standard weapon for Marines, replacing the M16A4.


Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly
Photo: US Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Vitaliy Rusavskiy

Before officially adopting it, the Corps put the M4 through extensive testing with a new round, the 5.56mm AB49 Special Operations Science and Technology cartridge.

Listen to the WATM podcast to hear the author and our veteran hosts discuss what the M4 means to the Corps:

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“We found out that the M4 actually outshoots the A4 at all ranges out to 600 meters with the new ammunition,” Chris Woodburn, the deputy Maneuver Branch head for the Fires and Maneuver Integration Division of Marine Corps Combat Development Command, told Marine Corps Times.

Because the M4 has already been deployed in units across the Marine Corps, the switch is expected to take place with very little cost to taxpayers. Units will report their number of rifles to Marine Corps Logistics Command which should be able to shuffle weapons between units.

The Marines believe they can equip the entire force with the weapon without buying any new units.

See the full story at Marine Corps Times 

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