This video follows an ISIS recruit's journey to Syria - We Are The Mighty
Intel

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

ISIS loves social media. It took the Al Qaeda recruiting manual “A Course in the Art of Recruiting” and put it on steroids with the use of Facebook and Twitter. The terror group is notoriously audacious in luring impressionable young adults to the Middle East and the number of recruits coming from the U.S. and other western countries is alarming.


Also watch: ISIS fighter with a unibrow says they plan to rule the world

This video shows what the path to extremism is like for a recruit. It follows a young man’s journey from civilian to ISIS soldier through the public postings on his Facebook account. These are the same techniques used to lure young men and women from the U.S.

Watch:

Now: Meet the ‘Angel of Death’ who’s trolling and killing ISIS fighters

OR: This former ISIS fighter from New York explains why he quit after only 3 days

Intel

An Air Force Academy cadet is trying to get Taylor Swift’s attention with this hilarious video

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Photo: YouTube


U.S. Air Force cadet Brett Hagan has big plans for next year’s Ring Dance.

The 23-year-old cadet recently uploaded a music video he created for none other than Taylor Swift, in the hopes that she will watch and agree to attend the formal with him in May of 2016, which celebrates promoting juniors.

The hilarious video is getting a lot of attention for its witty references to Swift’s song lyrics and Hagan’s impressive performance.

Despite her mega-star status, Hagan is hopeful that the starlet will “just say yes.”

“We could get to show her all the awesome things we do here. All the different mission we do here and she gets the full experience

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
of what it means to be an Air Force Academy Cadet, not a lot of people get that opportunity,” Hagan told KKTV 11 News.

Now let’s just hope there’s no bad blood if she declines.

Check out Hagan’s awesome video here:

NOW: The 13 funniest military memes of the week

Intel

Israel has an anti-vehicle suicide drone

Israel has a new drone that launches like a missile, flies over a target like a normal unmanned aerial vehicle, and then strikes with nearly twice the explosive power of a Hellfire missile.


The Harop, manufactured by Israel Aerospace Industries, can loiter over a target area for six hours, watching for bad guys until it’s ready to engage. Then it flies to the target, crashes into it, and detonates its 33-pound warhead.

The Harop is based on another IAI drone, the Harpy. The Harpy is suicide drone that was built specifically to find and engage radar stations.

IAI announced a successful test of the Harop June 7, according to IHS Jane’s 360, who also reported that the drone may have optional landing gear to allow for recovery when it doesn’t find a target.

Check out the video below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQTa7kWHSH4

NOW: The Navy wants to shoot 30 drones out of a cannon

Intel

Kids Hate MREs Just As Much As You Do

A local news crew was there when a group of middle schoolers got their first taste of MREs at Caruso Middle school in the Chicago suburbs, and it turns out they don’t really like them either.


Also Read: The Best Military Meals Ready-To-Eat, Ranked

The event was put on by the school council last year as part of their “Empathy Meal” program where students eat meals like those consumed by people of different backgrounds.

The school went for the authentic experience, with students heating their meals using chemical pads and eating on the ground outside.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

Students were assigned a meal, either cheese tortellini or pasta marinara.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

It was a communal meal and students, like the service members they were emulating, exchanged components of the meals.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

The popular items with the teens were, to the surprise of no one, the cookies and trail mix.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Check out the full video.

And also, via Buzzfeed, it turns out adult civilians don’t like them much either:

NOW: The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

OR: The 7 Things That Bring Joy To Soldiers In The Field

Articles

President ponders review of terrorist suspect interrogation and black sites

President Donald Trump is reportedly considering an executive order setting up a review of interrogation practices, including whether to re-open so-called “black sites” run by the CIA under the George W. Bush administration.


According to a report by CBSNews.com on a leaked draft of the order, the initiative would reverse executive orders issued by President Obama regarding Guantanamo Bay and interrogation techniques. Those orders were signed on Jan. 22, 2009.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Photo provided by Crown Publishing

The draft order raises the specter of the return of enhanced interrogation techniques. One of those who developed the techniques, retired Air Force Lt. Col. James Mitchell, fiercely denied they were torture in a forum at the American Enterprise Institute this past December.

The order also would keep the detention facilities at the U.S. Navy’s base at Guantanamo Bay open, saying, “The detention facilities at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, are legal, safe, and humane, and are consistent with international conventions regarding the laws of war.”

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Detainees in orange jumpsuits sit in a holding area under the watchful eyes of Military Police at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. 11, 2002. The detainees will be given a basic physical exam by a doctor, to include a chest x-ray and blood samples drawn to assess their health. (DoD photo by Petty Officer 1st class Shane T. McCoy, U.S. Navy)

“If it was torture, they wouldn’t have to pass a law in 2015 outlawing it because torture is already illegal, right?” Mitchell asked. “The highest Justice Department in the land wouldn’t have opined five times that it wasn’t torture — one time after I personally waterboarded an assistant attorney general before he made that decision three or four days later, right?”

When contacted for comments on the draft executive order, Mitchell said, “I would hope they just take a look at it.” He admitted he had not been contacted by the Trump administration or the Trump transition team, but pointed to an ACLU lawsuit that made him “damaged goods,” but did wish that they would “talk with someone who has interrogated a terrorist.”

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Senator John McCain campaigns for re-election to the senate in 2016. Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

In a statement released after the reports of the draft order emerged, Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain said, “The Army Field Manual does not include waterboarding or other forms of enhanced interrogation. The law requires the field manual to be updated to ensure it ‘complies with the legal obligations of the United States and reflects current, evidence-based, best practices for interrogation that are designed to elicit reliable and voluntary statements and do not involve the use or threat of force.’ Furthermore, the law requires any revisions to the field manual be made available to the public 30 days prior to the date the revisions take effect.”

Mitchell was very critical of McCain’s statement, noting that it essentially boils down to relying on terrorists to voluntarily give statements about their pending operations. “It’s nuts,” he said, after pointing out that counter-terrorist units don’t reveal their tactics. He also noted that “beer and cigarettes” or social influence tactics, like those Secretary of Defense James Mattis favored, are not included in the manual.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Detainees at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay during prayer (DoD photo)

Retired Army Lt. Col. Bob Maginnis backed up Mitchell’s comments.

“I favor giving the interrogation decisions to those with the need to know.  Not all threats are the same and there are situations where tough techniques are justified,” Maginnis told WATM. “I’m not with the camp that says tough interrogation techniques seldom if ever deliver useful outcomes. That’s for the experienced operator to know.”

Maginnis also expressed support for the use of “black sites” to keep suspected terrorists out of the reach of the American judicial system. He also noted, “Some of our allies are pretty effective at getting useful information from deadbeats.”

Senator McCain’s office did not return multiple calls asking follow-up questions regarding the senator’s Jan. 25 statement on the draft executive order.

Intel

A mesmerizing look at a taser being fired in super slow-motion

The Slow Mo Guys — a YouTube channel dedicated to filming action shots in super slow motion — released a cringeworthy video of one of their cameramen getting bare body tazed.


The video starts with a couple of incredible slow motion shots of the Taser being deployed: one side shot followed by a frontal.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Source: The Slow Mo Guys/YouTube

Dan Hafen, the volunteer for this experiment, is introduced at 1:50 of the video and soon takes off his shirt to capture the full prong penetration. OUCH.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Source: The Slow Mo Guys/YouTube

Watch his muscles contract from the point of impact to the rest of his back like a water rippling in a pond after a stone is tossed in.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Source: The Slow Mo Guys/YouTube

His face says it all.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Source: The Slow Mo Guys/YouTube

Here’s the barbed prong being pulled out of his skin.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Source: The Slow Mo Guys/YouTube

Service members authorized to carry Tasers have to pass a written test and be able to effectively engage a target with a minimum of two Taser cartridges before they can carry a Taser. Once they complete training, they have the option to get tazed, according to the Air Force.

Watch:

NOW: Airman gets tasered, grabs another airman’s junk

OR: Here’s the military’s incredibly painful ‘OC Spray’ training

Intel

You can be in the next ‘Call of Duty’ by supporting military veterans

Specifically, you can be a zombie in the upcoming “Call of Duty: Black Ops III.”


Omaze and ActivisionBlizzard are holding a contest where the winner will be turned into a zombie featured in the upcoming game. In addition to the zombification, the winner will have their name placed somewhere in the game world.

Entering the contest is done through charitable donations to the Call of Duty Endowment on the contest page at Omaze. Larger donations grant more entries into the contest and all donations come with benefits based on donation size. A lot of great perks are on the table – everything from in-game exclusives to autographed swag to a special lunch and VIP tour of the Treyarch studios, the developer of “Call of Duty: Black Ops III.”

The money raised goes to the Call of Duty Endowment, an organization that finds the best nonprofits helping fight veteran unemployment and then provides them with extra funding and networking opportunities. The endowment estimates that a veteran is employed for every $914 they spend, so even small donations can help put a veteran to work. Also, ActivisionBlizzard will match funds raised in the contest, doubling the impact for veterans.

See the perks and enter the contest here.

NOW: 11 celebrities you didn’t know were passionate about supporting America’s veterans

WATCH: Top 10 military shooter games | Military Insider

Intel

Will the US military continue to fly the Confederate flag?

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Photo: Flickr


The Confederate flag’s dark and nuanced history has long made the rebel banner an uncomfortable topic of conversation. In the minds of many Americans, it is a symbol of slavery and institutionalized racism – an emblem on par with the Nazi swastika. For others, it’s simply an expression of regional pride.

However, after the racially-motivated church slayings in South Carolina last week – committed by a man who was a proud flyer of the stars and bars – state governments have begun to remove the Confederate flag from their federal buildings. The United States military, on the other hand, has yet to address the issue officially.

South Carolina’s Army Guard still flies 16 streamers that were created under the Confederacy, and servicemen and women are allowed to sport the Confederate flag on clothing and tattoos — something the Defense Department does not consider offensive material. Still, some military officials have decided to retire the flag after the shootings, including The Citadel, South Carolina’s famous military academy, which removed the Confederate Naval Jack from its chapel.

Gen. Daniel Allyn, vice chief of the U.S. Army, spoke to the The Military Times about the rebel flag’s importance within the American military:

“I think that, when you are a student of military history, let’s face it: One of our greatest military generals in the history of our nation was Robert E. Lee,” Allyn said, referring to the legendary Confederate commander.

At Army posts throughout the country, there are “thousands of battle pictorials of Grant and Lee going up against each other with their requisite flags,” he added, noting Lee’s Union counterpart, Gen. Ulysses Grant, who later became America’s 18th president. “So yes, you will find those resident. And if those are offensive to people, I’m sure that our commanders will deal with that.”

“We swear our allegiance to the flag of the United States of America,” Allyn said, “… and we will protect and defend that flag.”

For more on the topic, check out The Military Times

NOW: Air Force policy change may give transgender airmen the chance to serve openly

OR: Enlisted women are going to serve on Navy submarines for the first time ever

Intel

This First-Person Video Shows What Tankers See While Blowing Targets Away

Tanks firing isn’t something many people think of as requiring marksmanship, but tankers take it very seriously. A new video shows Marines engaging targets at the range, and most of the footage is from the perspective of the tankers.


Also Read: 7 Incredible Narco Tanks Built By Mexican Cartels

With tanks firing, the big gun is, of course, the main draw. The 120-mm smoothbore can accurately fire shells over 2 kilometers.

This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

But the video also shows the operations of the loader, the crew member who feeds the gun.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

The tanks are on a firing line and there are great shots of one tank firing right after another.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria
Machine guns on the tank are not as flashy but crucial for protecting the crew. They get to spit some brass, too.
This video follows an ISIS recruit’s journey to Syria

Check out the full video on Youtube:

NOW: These Crazy Photos Show 30+ Ton Tanks In Flight

OR: How Well Do You Know The M4 Sherman Tank? Take the quiz

Intel

Emotional video shows the pain for Russians as their government hides its war in Ukraine

Vice News journalist Lucy Kafanov traveled to Russia to learn about soldiers who fought in Ukraine, and she found graves and families of fallen soldiers willing to talk with her about Russia’s “ghost war.”


She spoke with different Russians impacted by the secret deployments to the region, including a mother who lost her son, an uncle whose nephew was crippled, opposition leaders who have been beaten or silenced, and activists. In this emotional documentary, the truth is revealed about a war the Kremlin denies is even happening.

You can read more at Vice News. The full documentary is available below:

NOW: The US military took these amazing photos in just one week-long period

OR: ‘The Fighting Season’ nails the gritty realities of the Afghan War

Intel

Genius lets fellow soldier shoot him to test body armor

This video of a soldier letting his squadmate shoot him with an AK-47 is about as nuts as it gets.


“This is about the dumbest thing you can do,” the video description says. “But I filmed this one day when my friends were bored in Syria. War gets boring sometimes.”

The YouTube channel – which has other videos featuring Western volunteer troops in Syria – belongs to Robert Alleva, who is a volunteer fighter himself, according to the video description.

Watch:

This body armor test could have gone wrong in so many ways, especially considering that the weapon was on automatic mode. The video below shows what happens when things don’t go as expected. The Russian separatist takes one in the gut while testing his body armor with a pistol.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNikUcntvU0

NOW: Here’s a video of a soldier jumping out of an airplane and solving a Rubik’s Cube

OR: This hilarious video shows what deployment is really like

Articles

Watch this Navy SEAL talk about the night that earned him the Medal of Honor

Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward Byers, Jr. was bestowed the Medal of Honor on Feb. 29, 2016, for his incredible heroics in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.


On Dec. 8, 2012, Byers was part of a SEAL Team Six unit deep in the Taliban-controlled mountains of Afghanistan on a mission to rescue Dr. Dilip Josheph when all hell broke loose. According to the MoH citation, Byers distinguished himself that night by showing extreme courage and disregard for his life when he shielded the hostage with his body while simultaneously taking out two insurgents.

In this Navy video, Byers shares the story of that evening, as well as his reaction to the news that he would be receiving the Medal of Honor.

Watch:

Intel

“Severe Clear” is the Iraqi War through the eyes of frontline Marines

Shot by First Lt. Mike Scotti on his home camera,and told through the journal entries of Kristian Fraga, “Severe Clear” is a first-person account of the Marines who were on the front lines of Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003.


“Here is the truth about being a Marine that you won’t find on the local news,” Scotti says behind a jiggling, hand-held camera. “We’re loud. We drink too much, fight too much and swear too much. Truth be told, our rifles are the only things we think about more than sex.”

Watch this brief clip that captures some of the ups and downs of this roller coaster documentary:

Video: Dominic Mason, YouTube

Watch the full movie on YouTube or Amazon Prime for free.

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