Life Flip

How this SEAL transitioned from officer to entrepreneur

Making the transition from military to the civilian workforce is a challenging phase in the lives of veterans. While the thought of spending more time with family is comforting, starting afresh and beginning an all-new career can be quite a daunting task. After their military lives come to an end, most veterans begin their hunt for jobs but there are a few who have a different plan in mind.


From military to entrepreneurship

Meet Sean Matson, a former Navy SEAL who carved his path to entrepreneurship after having spent 10 years as a SEAL in the US Navy. While he is still serving his country in the Navy Reserves, Sean was deployed five times to a lot of austere locations during his 10-year active-duty career.

Sean Matson restocks a Strike Force display. (Photo by The Virginian Pilot and Vickie Cronis-Nohe)

Like many other veterans, Sean's transition to the civilian workforce was not an easy one. Not only was he unemployed after leaving the military, he was also stuck in the middle of a nasty divorce, causing him to almost lose custody of his children and face tremendous debt. All this while he was making ends meet to start his very own brand – Strike Force Energy, an energy drink.

The story behind Strike Force Energy

So, what made this ex-officer launch his own energy drink? Having spent years in the military, Sean understood the importance of energy drinks and caffeine among the military troops. He noticed how the existing drinks in the market were not doing the job of fueling the military — and to make matters worse, the bulky energy drink cans were nothing short of a burden. This gave rise to Strike Force Energy, an energy drink primarily targeted to the military troops.

Also read: Nick from Ranger Up on entrepreneurship, why most business books suck, & his hero Captain America

In a market filled with dubious energy drinks, Sean introduced a healthier and affordable alternative with Strike Force Energy. With zero sugar, zero calories, and the right amount of caffeine, taurine, and B vitamins, this energy drink promises to give you a boost without having an adverse impact on your health. What's more, its pocket-friendly packaging and attractive price point makes it popular among customers and retailers. Strike Force Energy comes in four flavors: original, grape, lemon, and orange, and it is available in packets or 750-milliliter pump bottles.

Strike Force Energy garners a positive response

This veteran-owned, American-made company enjoys exceptional margins and lower distribution costs compared to its competitors. "Our product has an over 70% gross margin due to in-house manufacturing and distribution combined with a 50:1 relative shipping and storage cost," says Sean. Its compact size also makes it easy to ship while occupying minimal space. Not just that, this drink has also been gaining preference over competitors owing to its taste.

In two years of business, the founders have received an incredible response and experienced exponential growth since inception. The brand has also made inroads into retail stores such as 7-Eleven and is also garnering interest from other retailers, grocery stores, and fast-food chains.

Strike Force Energy product.

Brand with a social mission

While his brand is doing incredibly well, Sean has not forgotten his roots. A socially responsible entrepreneur, he is committed to giving back to society through his venture. Strike Force Energy has partnered with non-profits and donates 10% of their gross sales to them to provide support for law enforcement officers and their families across America.

Top 4 tips for military veterans making the transition

Sean Matson shares his top 4 tips for military veterans looking to transition to the civilian workforce:

1. Start earlier than you think you should

2. The skills you learn in the military completely apply to the civilian workforce

3. Treat others the way you would like to be treated

4. Remember, you have the power to influence much more as a civilian than you ever did in the military

This military officer turned entrepreneur is confident that his energy drink has what it takes to compete with the leading players in the market. When asked what the future looks like for his business, he says "We are either going to be the best energy drink company or be bought by the best."

Strike Force Energy is available on Amazon or at Strike Force Energy. You can also find them in stores

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