Life Flip

This wounded warrior is turning steel into gold in Alabama

Alabama. The Heart of Dixie is home to many things: sweet tea, college football, Forrest Gump, and now, art?


Yep, you can ask Jenny if you don't believe it, but there is a industrial renaissance happening in this southern territory and it's happening FAST.

Redline Steel

Underneath the roof of a metal fabrication shop in Huntsville lies the team responsible for this artistic re-birthing. Redline Steel is blazing a trail and making a name as the wall-art decor producer as they overhaul the entire market with an eye for quality aesthetics along with a little southern grit.

Veteran turned fitness model turned entrepreneur, Colin Wayne is at the helm of this ship that is steering right into the path of any market shareholder corporation that wants to deny Redline Steel a chance at the crown, including Amazon.

This serial entrepreneur has been able to take his company from concept to a multi-million dollar business and expects it to exceed the billion-dollar mark in 5 years; an ambitious goal, but if Redline's past is a precursor for its future, it's very possible. Redline products have made their way all the way from Huntsville to some of the country's biggest patriot supporters (Grunt Style anyone?) as well as the living rooms and man-caves of individual patriots, from California to New York.

Also Read: Here's how veterans can get a head start to become a successful entrepreneur

In the process of seeking a gift for his son, Colin noticed the business potential within the wall-art decor market and made moves to seize an opportunity, turning a one-man operation into a full-scale company with over 40 employees in less than 2 years. All of this was accomplished using Colin's experience and limited resources.

After receiving his GED, Colin spent 6 years and 3 deployments in the Army National Guard and government services and ultimately left after being injured overseas. As an accidental fitness model, Colin's social media went viral, resulting in a prosperous career marked by appearances on over 50 magazine covers. The fitness model then discovered a natural attraction to marketing and sales and proceeded to teach himself market-share strategies and entrepreneurial skills via the internet and started a few of his own companies. Not bad for a kid from Alabama.

Colin Wayne, founder of Redline Steel.

Despite Colin's impressive track record, he insists that his managers and the rest of his team are the really the fire that puts the steam through the stacks. Redline Steel's been able to assemble a team of employees that have organically found their place within the organization, which is determined to keep their people happy and productive. They don't care much about a traditional resume and even are unique in their on boarding process. Colin is much more interested in evaluated people based on their values rather than solely by skill set and experience. And by starting everyone at an entry level position and rotating through other positions before settling into a permanent role allows employees to learn the company intrinsically from the group up and while evaluating where and how their skills can be most beneficial. If going by successful investors and entrepreneur, Marcus Lemonis' (THE PROFIT) standards of "People, Process, Product", Redline Steel is hitting the mark by finding quality people to engage in an efficient process yielding a great product.

If you're curious about Redline Steel's people, product, and process, you can watch Colin's web series (WAYNE'S WORLD) as he documents the companies internal operations and tracks their growth from quarter to quarter. Redline Steel has a large stock inventory selection as well as many customizable options for nearly all of their products.

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