Military working bees and other animals you didn't know serve in the US military - We Are The Mighty
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Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Most people know about military working dogs, but there are some lesser known creatures that also conduct missions for the U.S. military:


1. Honeybees

Honeybees can smell explosives and other compounds nearly as well as dogs can, so researchers have begun training bees in bomb detection. The bees are trained to believe that sugar water is typically located near TNT. Once they make the association between TNT and sugar, they can be employed in two ways.

First, they can be restricted to glass tubes at check points. When people, cars, and packages are moved through the checkpoint, handlers watch the bees to see if they start moving their proboscis, a feeding tube that is part of their mouth. Movement in multiple bees is a sure sign that explosives are in the area. Alternatively, the bees can be fitted with radio transponders and released into a large area. Handlers then watch on computer screens to see where the bees swarm to and then check that spot for a mine.

2. Dolphins and Sea Lions

Though they’re slowly being replaced by drones, the Navy still uses trained dolphins and sea lions to hunt for mines and enemy swimmers. The animals are trained over a number of years and then deployed in vulnerable harbors, marking the mines and swimmers for human personnel to clear or capture. The aquatic mammals mark divers by attaching devices to their scuba tanks or limbs. They mark mines by attaching a cable or buoy to the mine. The mammals have been deployed to Vietnam, the Persian Gulf, and both U.S. coasts.

One team of dolphins and handlers in the program, MK8, can deploy ahead of an amphibious landing group and indicate safe routes for ships, Marines, and other forces.

3. Mules

The Marine Corps has come up with a few innovative ideas for resupplying forward Marines, including stepping back to the days of pack animals and running mules. Mules were used in Afghanistan and the Marines maintain a training program at the Mountain Warfare Training Center in Bridgeport, California to prepare troops to use pack animals overseas.

4. Insect cyborgs

Currently going through development and testing in various DARPA programs, cyborg insects are designed for disaster relief and search-and-rescue missions. The bugs; muscles are controlled through implants. Researchers are experimenting with different power sources for the rig and any sensors strapped to the bug. One option that has been tested is nuclear cyborg bugs, where a low-radioactivity isotope is slowly broken down to power transmitters.

5. Horses

Most horse units were transitioned to mechanized in the lead up to World War II, and almost every U.S. horse unit has been shut down. But, there is an active law enforcement horse patrol in the U.S. Air Force. At Vandenberg Air Force Base, police have to clear launchpads and the surrounding area during missile launches and some of the area is too rough for ATVs. Also, patrols of the 40 miles of beach cannot always be done with vehicles due to a federally protected species that lives on the base. The horse patrols cover both the rough mountains and the beaches where vehicles can’t go. The U.S. also trains Marines and Special Forces to ride horses and other animals for certain operations.

 

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The US military took these incredible photos in just one week-long period

The military has very talented photographers in its ranks, and they constantly attempt to capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. This is the best of what they shot this week:


AIR FORCE

Two F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 31st Fighter Wing at Aviano Air Base, Italy, fly over Europe on March 20, 2015. The aircraft participate in a training sortie with the Estonian air force.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Senior Airman Christine Griffiths/US Air Force

Leaving a trail of dust in its wake, an MC-130J Commando II takes off April 2, 2015, at Melrose Air Force Range, N.M. The aircraft’s crew demonstrated its capability to take off, land and perform airdrops in remote areas during a joint exercise.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Airman 1st Class Shelby Kay-Fantozzi/US Air Force

NAVY

More than 630 Sailors, Marines and civilians aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) from a teal ribbon and spell out “ESX ARG” to show support for Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: US Navy

Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Keron King signals the pilots of an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter attached to the Vipers of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 48 during preflight preparations aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Abe McNatt/US Navy

ARMY

A Trooper assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, fires a mortar from a mortar tube mounted onto a Stryker Combat Vehicle during the unit’s platoon live-fire exercise at Smardan Training Area, Romania, Apr. 8, 2015. The purpose of the exercise is to demonstrate unit capabilities to Romanian military counterparts during live-fire training in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve-South.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Sgt. William A. Tanner/US Army

Infantrymen, assigned to 2nd Cavalry Regiment, provide security during an #OperationAtlanticResolve-South live-fire exercise at Smardan Training Area, Romania, April 6, 2015.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Sgt. William A. Tanner

MARINE CORPS

U.S. Marines attending the infantry officer course prepare to conduct a fast rope exercise during Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course (WTI) on Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., March 27, 2015. WTI is a seven-week event hosted by Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) cadre.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Lance Cpl. Jodson B. Graves/US Marine Corps

A U.S. Marine with Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, completes a pre-inspection before operating the M1A1 Abrams tank during Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) aboard Camp Pendleton, California, March 28, 2015. Marines with BLT 3/1 trained for combined arms operations in restricted terrain in preparation for their deployment this spring.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos/US Marine Corps

COAST GUARD

Marine Safety Security Team Honolulu conduct flight ops with crews from Air Station Barber’s Point to ensure U.S. Coast Guard Hawaii Pacific remain Semper Paratus.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Petty Officer 3rd Class Errik Gordon/US Coast Guard

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” – C. S. Lewis

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: US Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City

NOW: 9 tips for ‘skating’ in the Navy

AND: 62 glaring technical errors in ‘The Hurt Locker’

OR: Hurry up and watch ‘Predator’ in under 3 minutes:

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The 13 funniest military memes of the week

(Most of our memes this week came straight from Facebook, so thanks to everyone who shares on social media.)


1. E4 mafia? They can disappear faster than a Predator.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
E4 mafia runs the Army – except when there is a detail. Then they run from the Army.

2. You know there’s at least one sergeant warning everyone about sunburn. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

SEE ALSO: The top 7 videos of ISIS getting blown away

3. Inspections are done every 6 months, typically unannounced. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
I like to think Goose is in the back, taking pictures of everyone they fly close to.

 4. I’m a sniper, but I’m cross-trained in other sorts of bad*ssery. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

5. The Air Force is shocked to see that many planes in such a small place. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
The soldiers are jealous because they could only pack two duffel bags and the sailors got to bring their floating fortress.

6. Pilots are jocks. They don’t have much time for that book learnin’. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Surprisingly, the mechanics are the nerds.

7. This airman is here to get sh*t done.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Mostly folding towels, but GETS. IT. DONE.

8. Study hard, be prepared, then Christmas tree it. (via Sh-t My LPO Says)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

9. There are a lot of ways to assess your branch of service. (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Air Force rarely uses how tough their basic is.

10. Gunner’s mate chief is about to fire his button. (via Sh-t My LPO Says)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
At that tension, release velocity is about 450 meters per second.

11. Best way to compare civilian and military experiences.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Of course, when the DI walks in, your heart doesn’t drop so much as stop. Which is good, because he can find you when it’s beating.

 12. “I just want it to frame my face.” (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

13. “Here, a school of sharks sight easy prey.” (via Military Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

NOW: 11 things your recruiter told you (and what they really mean)

OR: Watch the top 10 military comedy shows.

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The 5 weirdest examples of military-inspired fashion

There’s no need to leave your love of military fashion at the parade grounds when you get off duty. Here are five great designs that’ll let you show your colors while turning heads. Or just make you look really weird. Either way will work.


1. RAF high heels

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Amy Hart/Pinterest

For the fashion-forward ace fighter pilot in your life, complete with five rivets annotating the number of kills the wearer has.

2. Digital camo crop top

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Vitaly V. Kuzmin

Perfect for hiding out in the woods or standing out in a crowd.

3. Who wore it better?

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photos: Wikimedia Commons

It takes a lot of personality to pull off this look, but the King of Pop rocked a sequined military jacket while receiving an award from President Ronald Reagan. Jimi Hendrix, a former member of the Army, rocked a more subdued version of the military dress jacket.

4. Dueling medals

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Ida Leo/Pinterest

Today’s fashionistas shouldn’t fear showing allegiance to multiple regimes. Here, a woman displays her love for the U.S. military, the bail enforcers, and communism, all displayed on a military style coat. The pistol belt allows wearers to quickly dispatch enemies of the state, subdue bail jumpers, or protect the freedoms of civilians, depending on which medal is given precedence that day.

5. Classic spats for modern women

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Ida Leo/Pinterest

This great design takes the gaiters, formerly relegated to protecting boots during marches in the backcountry, to the catwalk. Pair it with high heels and a matching purse.

NOW: 9 military uniform items that Jennifer Aniston made into fashion staples

OR: ‘You’re really pretty for being in the Army’

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The 13 funniest military memes this week – battle buddy edition

This week’s meme roundup is dedicated to the friends you go to war with: Your battle buddies. These friends would do anything for you, even take a bullet, or in the case of Medal of Honor recipient Kyle Carpenter, jump on a grenade. The bond between battle buddies is second to none, and most people will never experience friendship on this level. Although it’s difficult to capture the bromance in 13 memes, here’s our attempt:


1. Battle buddies depend on each other.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

When the leadership fails, your buddy won’t.

2. Battle buddies aren’t always human.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Man’s best friend is just as dedicated.

3. War is intense, so jokes and pranks are also elevated to the same level.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

This is their version of “kick me.”

4. You get in trouble together.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

No worries, it’s a just a mouth lashing.

5. You find creative ways to entertain each other.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

This would make a great, “shut the fu– up Carl” meme.

6. Their idea of going to the movies is a little different.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Their camaraderie makes up for the lack of screen size.

7. They fight together, they watch movies together, and they also drink together …

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

… because sometimes you need someone to stagger home with.

8. Buddies look after each other, they don’t report each other.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Seriously, how do those dixie cup hats stay on?!

9. They settle things differently.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

The quickest way to getting over a disagreement. (from Military Memes Facebook fan page)

10. Your pain is the butt of their jokes.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

They brandish bumps and scars like badges of honor, but more importantly, to show you how much tougher they are.

11. Despite all the shenanigans, buddies will always have your back.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

They’ll follow each other to the gates of hell. (from Military Memes Facebook fan page)

12. They’ll look after each other like their life depends on it.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
There’s no worse feeling than the feeling of letting your buddy down.

13. Battle buddies forever.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

Battle buddies keep their promises. If they said they’ll be there, they’ll be there.

NOW: 10 tips for dating on a forward operating base

AND: 9 Military terms that will make you sound crazy around civilians

OR WATCH: 13 Signs you’re in the infantry:

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9 ways you can show appreciation on Armed Forces Day

On August 31, 1949, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson announced the creation of an Armed Forces Day which serves as a day to honor all those who serve in the sister-service branches.

The men and women of the military have made exceptional sacrifices and so on Armed Forces Day and all other military appreciation days, we can do small acts to show our gratitude to them.

Below are some ideas of how to show your appreciation:


1. Volunteer at a VA hospital or donate your time to a veterans group.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

There are 152 veteran medical centers in the US as well as hundreds of clinics, outpatient and nursing facilities. Call your local VA medical center or community to learn more about donating your time.

2. Talk to veterans or an active service member.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Retired Master Sgt. Earl Hamilton, Sr., Veterans of Foreign Wars Enterprise Chapter member, salutes the colors
(Photo by Russell Sellers)

Ask questions about their service, why they joined the military and listen to their stories. A little interest can go a long way.

3. Visit a memorial.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Golden Gate National Cemetery is located in San Bruno, CA, and is a monument to the service of countless veterans of foreign wars.

All across the US, military members are honored through monuments that memorialize their service and sacrifice. Washington DC is home to 8, but monuments dedicated to members of the military can be found throughout the nation.

4. Put together a care package.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
(Department of Defense photo)

With so many USO centers sending a comforting package is easy. Check with your local center to ensure that they can send out the package. You can fill them up with snacks and non-perishable food, toiletries, stationery or purchase a pre-made package.

5. Donate to a worthy cause.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
About 20 volunteersu00a0converged in the Santa Cruz area to join other community volunteers and a slew of professional surfers to help wounded service members and veterans overcome the perceived limitations of theiru00a0physical and psychological disabilities.
(Photo by Steven L. Shepard)

Organizations such as the Wounded Warrior Project, Homes for Our Troops or Disabled American Veterans all work to assist military members, both active and vets, in rebuilding their lives. Organizations like Operation Homefront assist the families of servicemen and women with food, school supplies, finances and housing.

6. Attend a parade.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
(U.S. Embassy photo by Vince Alongi)

Cities across the US celebrate Armed Forces Day with parades. Some of the most famous parades can be found in the cities of Torrence, California, Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Washington D.C.

7. Offer to help a military spouse.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
(U.S. Army National Guard photo by 1st Lt. Leanna Litsch)

While expressing gratitude to service members is encouraged, so is helping out their families. With one person at home, daily tasks can get overwhelming and a break is welcome. Offer to cook a meal, drive them somewhere or watch their children for a few hours.

8. Fly a flag, the correct way.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Honor Guard member, Airman First Class Michael Gibson, 50th Force Support Squadron, reaches for the flag during retreat.
(U.S. Air Force Photo by Dennis Rogers)

Sometimes the simplest expressions of gratitude are the most appreciated. Make sure that if you do fly America’s Stars and Stripes you follow the code.

9. A simple thank you.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Claudia greets her husband, Lt. Col. Gary Symon, 71st Rescue Squadron (RQS) commander, during a redeployment, Oct. 6, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen from the 71st RQS supported deployed operations by providing expeditionary personnel with on-call recovery forces should they need rescued
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Sometimes this is the most honest expression of gratitude to those who serve our country.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

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The shortest wars in history

While most the well-known wars in history dragged on for years, even decades, many wars in the last century were extremely short. Border disputes, tensions over ethnic populations, trade issues, hangovers from the two world wars or long-simmering pent-up hostilities have all exploded into shooting wars – many lasting just a few weeks or even a few days. In one case, the war was over in less than an hour.


Whether these shortest wars were low intensity conflicts with just a few casualties or brutal, bloody wars that were ended before they could get worse, these wars might have been short, but they were all historically important. The shortest wars in history have taken place on all different continents, between many different countries, over many historical eras. A short war is certainly better than a long, drawn-out war, so at least these historical battles and skirmishes were ended quickly.

What was the shortest war in history? Check out this list of short wars to find out!

 

The Shortest Wars in History

 

More from Ranker:

This article originally appeared at Ranker. Copyright 2015. Like Ranker on Facebook.

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7 reasons the ‘Carl Gustav’ is an infantryman’s best friend

The infantry is loaded down with all sorts of weapons and gear, some of it loved and some of it absolutely hated for being unnecessary weight. But while the Carl Gustav recoilless rifle weighs nearly 20 pounds and each round is almost 10 more, the infantry still loves the darned thing.


Why? Because it’s lethal, accurate, has long-range, and is reliable. Check it out:

1. The Carl Gustav has a longer range than many American rifles and gives infantrymen the capability of killing enemies at up to 3,000 feet.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Australian soldiers assigned to 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment fire an 84 mm M3 Carl Gustave rocket launcher at Range 10, Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 20, 2014, during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. (U.S. Marine photo by Sgt. Matthew Callahan/Released)

2. The accuracy of the weapon comes from its rifled barrel, but Gustav rounds fly relatively slowly. Hitting anything mobile at over 1,500 feet requires skilled firing.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Defense Imagery Management Operations Center

3. Interchangeable weapon sights allow shooters to choose between iron sights, magnified optics, or low-light aiming devices.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
U.S. Paratroopers assigned to 173rd Airborne Brigade fires the M3 Carl Gustav rocket launcher at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, Aug. 18, 2016. (Photo: U.S. Army Visual Information Specialist Gerhard Seuffert)

4. Despite the heft of the nearly 10-pound Gustav rounds, the shooters feel little recoil thanks to a large blast that balances the forces (and creates an awesome fireball).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
A Marine Special Operations Command member fires a Carl Gustav Recoilless rifle system on a range during training in Washer district, Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 16, 2013. (Photo: U.S. Army Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/Released)

5. Saab-Bofors produces 10 types of ammunition for the weapon — everything from airburst high-explosive rounds to anti-structure munitions that bring down buildings.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
(Photo: U.S. Army Visual Information Specialist Gerhard Seuffert)

6. The Gustav has been manufactured in four major variants, each lighter than the previous. America mainly fields the M3 which weighs 19 pounds.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
United States Army Spc. Craig Loughry, a 24-year-old native of Kent, Ohio, assigned to Dog Company, 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade, has the unenviable task of carrying his squad’s Carl Gustav M2CG recoilless rifle. (Photo: U.S. Army Sgt. James Avery)

7. The Carl Gustav is relatively simple and easy to use. It’s basically a barrel with grips, weapon sights, and a hinge for loading ammunition. This allows new shooters to quickly train on its use.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Coalition Forces fire a Gustav during a range day at FOB Shank, Afghanistan, on July 26, 2013. The purpose of the range was for the soldiers to practice using their heavy weapons. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Liam Mulrooney)

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The 13 funniest military memes of the week

Hallo-memes! Wait … that’s not right. Meh, whatever.


1. Remember, terrorists “trick or treat” too (via Military Memes).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Get special candy for them.

2. Pretty sure DA PAM 670-1 Chapter 5 Section 7 addresses this.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

SEE ALSO: From 1860-1916 the uniform regulations for the British Army required ever soldier to have a mustache

3. How the invasion of Iraq really went down:

(via Pop Smoke)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

4. When you join the Navy to see the sights:

(via Sh-t My LPO Says)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
At least you’re in California. You could be stuck with those same sights in Afghanistan.

5. Your trip to find yourself in Vienna does not impress your elders (via Air Force Nation).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
If you were finding Nazis there, maybe. You’d have to fight them too.

6. How the military branches decide who’s the most awesome/fabulous (via Sh-t My LPO Says).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Coast Guard has it made.

7. Just two combat veterans letting off a little steam in a war zone (via Ranger Up).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Bet the A-10 kept flying combat missions until at least the second trimester.

8. The standard is Army STRONG …

(via Marine Corps Memes)

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
… we’re not worried about much else.

9. He forgot how to Marine (via Terminal Lance).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Hey, staff officers have to practice throwing grenades too. Just don’t give him a real one.

10. Stolen valor airman can’t be bothered to learn your Air Force culture (via Air Force Nation).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

11. This is true (via Military Memes).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Iraq and Afghanistan would look a little different if soldiers and Marines had access to nukes.

12. First sergeant just wants you to be ready to fight in any environment.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Side note: If you ran at the actual pace he was trying to set, you would be warm during the run.

13. Real warriors like to stay cool (via Marine Corps Memes).

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Don’t like the view? Get out of the mortar pit.

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8 best examples of nonsensical ‘military logic’

Military logic is like military intelligence; it seems like an oxymoron until you realize it just follows its own — very weird — rules.


But sometimes, there’s just no way to read the rules that makes sense, and you’re left with these eight moments:

1. Just going to break these new boots in before we get into contact …

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
In other news, never use your fighting load carrier in a fight and avoid getting into combat in the Army combat uniform.

2. In the Air Force’s defense, airmen have a better history of success with planes than dates.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Don’t talk to the cheerleader; save the world.

3. Come on, he left the pin in it.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Alright, gonna go work on my college courses after just one more game.

4. In their defense, every bag that wasn’t laid out was inevitably incomplete on target.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
So, this one might be on the joes, not the generals.

5. What they really mean is that it’s too simple to make a good evaluation bullet.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Better complicate it up and turn it into a mind-numbing PowerPoint deck. (via America’s Sgt Maj.)

6. Oh, the quaint old days when the jets cost only $70 million.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
The F-35 will take aerial warfare into the future of ridiculous overmatch.

7. What if a truck comes by and can’t see the soldiers in their fancy camouflage?

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Also, are we not going to talk about why we need to rake the dirt in the first place?

8. Long drives are dangerous, that’s why you should only do them in large convoys at night in tactical conditions.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Let’s be honest, he’s just trying to limit the first sergeant has to drive to pick up all the troops hit with DUIs.

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The US military took these incredible photos this week

The military has very talented photographers in its ranks, and they constantly attempt to capture what life as a service member is like during training and at war. This is the best of what they shot this week:


NAVY:

Never forget

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by USN

The guided-missile destroyer USS Carney departs Mayport for its new homeport of Rota, Spain, Sept. 6.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John S. Smolinski/USN

ARMY:

Soldiers, assigned to 7th Infantry Divisionand 10th Mountain Division, part of Train, Advise and Assist Command – South, test their strength and endurance with an ammo-can carry during the Bayonet Mile II, a series of team-oriented combat skills tests conducted by Soldiers from the U.S. and theAustralian Army on Kandahar, Afghanistan, Sept. 6, 2015.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Lt. Col. Bill Coppernoll/US Army

Soldiers, assigned to United States Army Europe – USAREUR, U.S. Army Africa, KFOR Multinational Battle Group-East, and NATO line up for a 12-mile ruck, their final test prior to earning the U.S. Army Europe Field Medical Badge, Grafenwoehr, Germany.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Capt. Jeku Arce/US Army

AIR FORCE:

An F-22 Raptor pilot from the 95th Fighter Squadron based at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., gets situated in his aircraft prior to taking off from Ämari Air Base, Estonia, Sept. 4, 2015.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Tech. Sgt. Ryan Crane/USAF

Airman 1st Class Stefan Alvarez, a 3rd Combat Camera Squadron photojournalist, loads 5.56 mm ammunition into an M4 magazine in preparation for the next drill during Advanced Weapons and Tactics Training Sept. 4, 2015, in Converse, Texas.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee/USAF

MARINE CORPS:

A Critical Skills Operator with U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command uses a torch to cut through a metal door to gain entry on a building during Marine Special Operation School’s Master Breacher’s Course at Stone Bay aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Aug. 5, 2015.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Sgt. Scott A. Achtemeier/USMC

1st Lt. Keith G. Lowell administers OC spray during the OC Spray Performance Evaluation Course on Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 27, 2015. This course is part of the Non-Lethal Weapons Instructor Course, which is only offered once a year to all service members on Okinawa.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by Cpl. Thor Larson/USMC

COAST GUARD:

U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Diego ASTs run pilots and aviation crews through Shallow Water Egress Training at Naval Base Point Loma. The training is conducted in a controlled environment to prepare flight crews on how to safely exit an overturned helicopter in the water.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by USCG

Aircrew members from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak deploy two weather data-collecting probes from an HC-130 Hercules airplane above the Arctic Circle.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo by PA3 Lauren Steenson/USCG

NOW: More awesome military photos

OR WATCH: Where were the US fighters on 9/11?

Humor

5 crazy Hollywood hazing scenes that probably happened

Nothing excites film audiences more than seeing their favorite characters get pushed to the brink of their physical and mental limits, just to see them return stronger than ever.


It’s no secret that in the military “newbies,” “FNGs,” or “boots” tend to be treated unfairly because of their low rank and inexperience. It happens more than you think. Some call it “playing games,” while others label it as “hazing.”

Some still consider hazing a necessary evil in training as it allows service members a way to earn the respect of their brothers. Typically, this is earned during drinking games (not passing out), or being the PT stud (not falling out) — rarely does it consist of violent acts these days.

But once Hollywood got wind of the concept, they decided to use it as a tool to dehumanize the military genre.

Related: 5 military myths that Hollywood has taught us to believe are true

1. Choke yourself

Stanley Kubrick was a fan of showing as much mental and physical torment as he could possibly pack into 1987’s “Full Metal Jacket.” It’s been said several times that this film was as true to life for Marine boot camp as it got. So you can bet that there has been a recruit or two that has been in a Marine drill instructor deadly grasp.

Poor Pvt. Pyle (WB/Giphy images)

2. Branding

Bodily marking is a traditional way of documenting one’s life journey. Today tattoos are the fan favorite, but sometimes you just don’t have enough ink.

In 2005’s Sam Mendes directed “Jarhead,” Jake Gyllenhaal plays Marine sniper Anthony Swofford who gets a surprise greeting from his fellow brother-in-arms.

F*ck-f*ck games at their best (Uni/Giphy images)

3. Blanket party

Everyone likes to attend a good party in someone else’s honor. Hazing has been attributed to a way of teaching a sh*tbag a valuable lesson the hard way. In the military, when one person screws up, everyone screws up.

Hopefully, you’re not the one sleeping during the party (WB/Giphy images)

4. Code red

We don’t condone waking up anyone in the middle of the night by beating them, but that isn’t to say it hasn’t happened before.

Makes you want to sleep with one eye open (Columbia/Giphy images)

 Also read: 5 epic military movie mistakes

5. Hanging in a closet

In 2004’s “Stateside,” Jonathan Tucker plays Mark Deloach, a teen who goes to the Marines just to get the sh*t hazed out of him by his drill instructor played by Val Kilmer.

The bird really was the word (IDP/Giphy images)Can you think of any others? Be sure to comment and let us know.

Articles

The 9 most-ridiculous North Korean propaganda claims

It’s no secret that North Korea controls its people through fear and propaganda. Here are some of the craziest propaganda claims we’ve ever heard from the Hermit Kingdom:


1. North Korea made a video depicting 150,000 US citizens taken hostage during their invasion of the South Korean capital, Seoul.

2. Kim Jong-Un climbed North Korea’s highest mountain wearing a long top coat and dress shoes.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Kim Jong-Un on the summit of Mt. Paektu. Photo released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on April 19, 2015

3. Kim Jong-Il phoned the North Korean soccer coach during their World Cup match against Brazil with an invisible phone he invented himself.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Dollar Photo Club

4. That time Kim Jong-Il tried golf for the first time and finished with 11 holes-in-one to achieve a 38-under-par game on a championship 18-hole golf course.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Photo: Wikimedia

5. Then there was the time Kim Jong-Il’s track suits set the fashion world on fire, turning him into a fashion icon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6HwsmtzM1k

6. According to North Korea, Americans are imperialists that enjoy killing babies.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military
Do not forget the U.S. imperialist wolves!

7. Kim Jong-Il has never urinated or defecated.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

8. North Korea is the second happiest country behind China, according to North Korean researchers. The United States is dead last.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

9. Perhaps the cruelest North Korean propaganda poster ever. The country often suffering from famine claims it has lots of food.

Military working bees and other animals you didn’t know serve in the US military

NOW: North Korea now has a nuclear-capable missile that can hit the US

OR: North Korea may have equipped two submarines with ballistic missile launch tubes

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