Lists

9 John Bolton quotes that prove he's the worst national security 'expert'

In the latest of a series of White House personnel changes, President Donald Trump on March 22, 2018, replaced his national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, with John Bolton, a former US ambassador to the UN.


Bolton is well-known for his hawkish statements, to say the least.

"John Bolton was by far the most dangerous man we had in the entire eight years of the Bush administration," Richard Painter, the chief White House ethics lawyer under President George W. Bush, tweeted on March 16, 2018. "Hiring him as the president's top national security advisor is an invitation to war, perhaps nuclear war."

Also read: John Bolton still thinks the Iraq War was a good idea

It's quite the statement about an administration that included Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, and other notable hawks of the 21st century.

Here are nine things Bolton has said that scare the national-security establishment.

1. "The Secretariat building in New York has 38 stories; if you lost 10 stories today, it wouldn't make a bit of difference," Bolton said in a 1994 speech, referring to the UN's headquarters. He added later: "There's no such thing as the United Nations."

2. "I expect that the American role actually will be fairly minimal," Bolton said in 2002, before the US invasion of Iraq. "I think we'll have an important security role."

3. "The main thing people feared at that time was Saddam Hussein's chemical weapons stocks," Bolton said in 2009, defending the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

In reality, what most feared was the Bush administration's false claims that Hussein had nuclear ambitions and that the Iraqi government had ties to terrorist groups such as al-Qaeda.

Source: Hoover Institution

Related: Trump's newest advisor really wants to bomb North Korea

4. "I still think the decision to overthrow Saddam was correct," Bolton told the Washington Examiner in 2015. "I think decisions made after that decision were wrong, although I think the worst decision made after that was the 2011 decision to withdraw US and coalition forces."

(Photo by Gage Skidmore)

Source: Washington Examiner

5. "I think obviously this needs to be done in a careful and prudent fashion," Bolton said in 2008 of a strike on Iran. "But I think that the strategic situation now is that if we don't respond, the Iranians will take it as a sign of weakness."

Source: Fox News

6. "A strike accompanied by effective public diplomacy could well turn Iran's diverse population against an oppressive regime," Bolton wrote in 2009, advocating a strike on Iran by Israel. "Most of the Arab world's leaders would welcome Israel solving the Iran nuclear problem, although they certainly won't say so publicly and will rhetorically embrace Iran if Israel strikes."

Source: Wall Street Journal

More: The 13 funniest military memes for the week of March 23rd

7. "The inescapable conclusion is that Iran will not negotiate away its nuclear program," Bolton wrote in 2015. "Nor will sanctions block its building a broad and deep weapons infrastructure. The inconvenient truth is that only military action like Israel's 1981 attack on Saddam Hussein's Osirak reactor in Iraq or its 2007 destruction of a Syrian reactor, designed and built by North Korea, can accomplish what is required. Time is terribly short, but a strike can still succeed."

Source: New York Times

8. "King Abdullah of Jordan, who is not simply the Muslim king of a Muslim country, unlike our president," Bolton said in an August 2016 speech to the conservative American Freedom Alliance.

Source: American Freedom Alliance

9. "It is perfectly legitimate for the United States to respond to the current 'necessity' posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons by striking first," Bolton wrote in February 2018.

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