7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in 'Heartbreak Ridge' - We Are The Mighty
Humor

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The 1986 movie “Heartbreak Ridge” took the Marine Corps community and audiences by storm as it showcased Gunnery Sgt. Thomas Highway’s rough and tumble personality. Clint Eastwood took on dual roles as he starred in and directed this iconic film role about a man who is on the tail-end of his military service.


Related: 7 life lessons we learned from watching ‘Full Metal Jacket’

Behind Gunny Highway’s tough exterior lies a man who knows plenty about being a career Marine, but also has a need to build relationships as he moves forward in life.

So check out these life lessons that we could all learn from our beloved Gunny.

1. Don’t let anyone punk you

In Gunny’s own words, “be advised that I’m mean, nasty, and tired. I eat concertina wire and piss napalm and I can put a round through a flea’s ass at 200 meters.”

You tell them, Gunny. (images via Giphy)

2. Know exactly who you are

Although the majority of the film’s characters were out to discourage him, that didn’t stop him from being true to himself.

(images via Giphy)

3. Be semi-approachable

Yes, Gunny is a hard ass, but giving a treat to somebody to shut them the hell up is an excellent networking technique.

Gunny always finds a way to make friends. (images via Giphy)

4. Size doesn’t matter

You can have the biggest muscles in the room, but if you don’t have that “thinker” sitting in between your two ears, you don’t have sh*t.

Gunny doesn’t back down. (images via Giphy)

5. Grunts vs. POGs

The rivalry is real.

When you have some trigger time under your belt and know you’re right, sound off to make your point loud and clear.

Get him! (images via Giphy)

Also Read: 8 life lessons from ‘Forrest Gump’ legend Lt. Dan

6. Lead from the front

Leadership is about showing your men that you will fight with them and for them.

(images via Giphy)

7. Being patriotic is a turn on

No matter how hardcore you are, after a long day of kicking ass and taking names, it’s always good to have someone to come home too.

And Gunny lives happily ever after. (images via Giphy)We told you this movie was about relationships.

MIGHTY TRENDING

A leaked recording shows Iran knew from the start it had shot down a passenger jet, Ukraine says

Iranian officials knew their military had shot down a passenger jet and lied about it for days, Ukraine said Sunday, citing a leaked audio recording of an Iranian pilot communicating with air-traffic control in the capital Tehran.


In the leaked audio recording — said to be from the night in January when Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 was shot down — a pilot for Iran Aseman Airlines radioed the air-traffic control tower to say he saw the “light of a missile,” Reuters reports.

The control tower can reportedly be heard trying, unsuccessfully, to reach the Ukrainian passenger aircraft on the radio as the Iranian pilot says he saw “an explosion.”

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky.

Aseman Flight 3768 was close enough to the airport in Tehran to see the blast, the Associated Press reported, citing publicly available flight-tracking data.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a television interview that the recording “proves that the Iranian side knew from the start that our plane had been hit by a missile.”

Ukraine International Airlines said, according to Reuters, that the audio was “yet more proof that the UIA airplane was shot down with a missile, and there were no restrictions or warnings from dispatchers of any risk to flights of civilian aircraft in the vicinity of the airport.”

UIA Flight 752 was flying from Tehran to the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, on January 8 when it was shot down shortly after takeoff, killing all 176 people on board. The incident happened just hours after Iran launched a barrage of ballistic missiles at US forces in Iraq in retaliation for a US drone strike that killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, and the country’s air-defense systems were on high alert.

Iran initially said the aircraft crashed as the result of a mechanical error, but reports quickly began surfacing in the US, Canada, and parts of Europe that intelligence suggested the plane was shot down by a surface-to-air missile. Iran vehemently denied the accusations.

On January 11, however, Iran acknowledged that it accidentally shot down the commercial airliner.

Though it blamed “human error,” Iran also sought to cast responsibility with the US, arguing that the killing of Soleimani had led to a dangerous spike in tensions that resulted in the accident. Still, Iranian citizens and international observers questioned why Iran didn’t ground civilian air traffic after its missile attack on US-occupied bases in Iraq.

Iran said it mistook the airliner for an enemy missile. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called the incident a “grave tragedy” and an “unforgivable mistake.”

Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization is in charge of investigating aviation incidents, with one official saying Ukraine’s decision to release the confidential recording, which aired on Ukrainian television, had “led to us not sharing any more information with them.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY TRENDING

This new nationally recognized day for women veterans almost snuck by us

There are many nationally recognized days on the calendar that sneak by without much notice if you aren’t paying attention. But here’s one that’s worth being rallied around, especially in the military community.


On Feb. 19, 2019, Vet Girls RISE founded National Vet Girls Rock Day. It’s a time set aside to acknowledge and celebrate the many veteran women who have served in the United States Military. Other reasons this organization established this day is for the women to bond, share resources, build relationships, and most of all bring awareness to existing needs among women veterans.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

1st Lt. Megan Juliana(left), 1st Lt. Christel Carmody, 2nd Lt. Rebecca Fry, attendees of the inaugural 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Sisters-in-Arms meeting flash big smiles during the event on Camp Buehring, Kuwait, Jan. 21, 2014. The program aims at allowing female soldiers from across the brigade to meet each other and learn a little about the different positions female “Warhorse” soldiers fill.
(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jarrad Spinner, 2nd ABCT PAO, 4th Inf. Div.)

According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, 10 percent of veterans are female. Although that may seem like a small percentage, the approximate number is around two million.

Women veterans serve as single service members and in dual-military homes. Apart from their male counterparts, they face their own set of challenges during their time in. They push themselves physically, carry and birth children, and come home after working to care for and nurture their families. All while staying true to their commitment to our country and ultimately being willing to sacrifice themselves to protect our freedom.

Being that it’s only a year into having an actual date on the calendar, many women veterans don’t even know this day exists in their honor.

Crystal Falch, a veteran Petty Officer Second Class, served in the Navy for 10 years. Vet Girls ROCK Day snuck by her as well. She was happy to receive a friend’s text acknowledging her. Falch’s response was, “Awe, thank you! I had no idea today was my day.”

“It’s humbling because most of us don’t do it for the glory or the praise,” Falch said. “We do it for the country. And of course we like all the side benefits, like getting college paid for and getting to see the world. I appreciate it!”

As the public is becoming aware of this nationally recognized day some businesses, like Severance Brewing, are giving discounts to women veterans.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Senior Airman Brittany Grimes, 90th Security Forces Squadron remote display alarm monitor, and Senior Airman Amber Mitchell, 890th Missile Security Forces Squadron response force leader, pose for a photo at F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., March 13, 2018. Both are defenders assigned to the 90th Security Forces Group. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Breanna Carter)

VGR believes in the power of camaraderie, knowledge, and alliance. With that as a backbone, they suggest using this day to connect with other veterans. They offer VGR meetups at different restaurants across the country, and you can also follow them on Facebook for updated information.

Every opportunity should be taken to thank a service member, and to commemorate their dedication to our country. This day is definitely worth putting on the calendar as a reminder to stop and reflect specifically on women veterans for their contribution to our country.

MIGHTY TRENDING

What will happen to the foreign ISIS fighters in Syria?

October 2019, US President Donald Trump made the abrupt decision to pull the remaining US troops out of Kurdish-controlled areas in Syria.

The move sent the fragmented country into a spiral, disrupting one of its few areas of stability. By withdrawing support from Kurdish forces in the area — which had helped the US combat ISIS — Trump opened them up to an oncoming offensive by Turkey.

Justifying the decision. Trump argued that US forces in the region had already “defeated” ISIS, and that therefore there was no need for them to stay in Syria.

This was, at best, only partly true.


While US-allied forces this year deprived ISIS of the territory it once controlled, the group still has as many as 18,000 fighters quietly stationed across Iraq and Syria, according to The New York Times.

Additionally, Kurdish-led fighters, known as The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) had maintained control of tens of thousands of former ISIS members and their families, including about 70,000 women and children in a compound in the Syrian city of al-Hol, according to the Atlantic. Of those detainees, 11,000 of them are foreign nationals, according to the BBC.

The SDF has said it is holding more than 12,000 men suspected of being ISIS fighters across seven prisons it operates, estimating that more than 4,000 of those prisoners are foreign nationals, the BBC said.

The fate of those prisoners remains uncertain, particularly in the wake of the US pullout.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

ISIS

Turkey has taken over parts of Syria, and with it, ISIS prisoners

On Oct. 22, 2019, Russia and Turkey took advantage of the power vacuum that had been created and signed an agreement to expand their control in Syria and minimize Kurdish territory.

As part of the deal, Russian military police and Syrian border guards entered the Syrian side of the Turkish-Syrian border, pushing Kurdish forces back to 30 kilometers (18 miles) from the border.

Turkey says it will use the reclaimed area to create a “buffer zone” along its border and will use the land to resettle more than 1 million Syrian refugees displaced by the war.

But as Turkey gains land in Syria, it has also taken on the task of figuring out what to do with former Islamic State detainees, many of whom are now under its control. Turkey has faced criticism in the past for its porous border, which allowed foreign fighters to enter Syria and join the Islamic State to begin with.

But Turkey doesn’t want to deal with them, and neither does the rest of the world 

According to a 2016 report by the World Bank, foreign ISIS fighters have been recruited from “all continents across the globe,” though it named Russia, France, and Germany as the top Western suppliers of ISIS’ foreign workforce.

Data from the Institute for the Study of War also indicated that significant portions of foreign fighters also came from European countries like the UK, Belgium, and France between December 2015 and March 2016.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

(ISW)

Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said last week that about 1,200 foreign ISIS fighters were in Turkish prisons, and warned that Turkey would not become “a hotel” for militants.

On Nov. 11, 2019, Turkey began deporting foreign nationals said to be linked to ISIS back to their home countries.

One of those foreign nationals was from the US, a spokesperson for Turkey’s interior minister said, though according to the BBC the man remained stranded at the Greek border after choosing not to return to the US. On Thursday morning, Turkey’s Interior Ministry said that the man would be brought to the US.

Turkey’s interior minister added the country was planning to deport “several more terrorists back to Germany” this week, and that legal proceedings against two Irish nationals and 11 French citizens captured in Syria were underway. A spokesperson for Germany’s foreign ministry confirmed to German broadcaster Deutsche Welle that three men, five women and two children were being returned to Germany this week.

But many of those countries have not put a concrete policy in place for what to do with ISIS foreign fighters or their families that remain in displacement camps in Syria, or have refused to allow them to return.

Trump said in his statement in October 2019 that he discussed the issue of repatriating foreign fighters with France, Germany, and other European nations but they “did not want them and refused.”

Foreign nationals abroad are traditionally entitled to consular services abroad, though many European nations have been cautious about offering help to citizens who joined ISIS on national security grounds. Under international law, it is illegal to strip people of their citizenship if it will leave them stateless.

In April 2019, Germany approved a bill stripping dual nationals of their citizenship if they traveled overseas to fight in a foreign terror group, though the law does not apply to women and children. In June 2019, France passed legislation stating that it would repatriate French jihadists on a case-by-case basis.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

There are concerns that ISIS may take advantage of the uncertainty to regroup

But the UN has stood firm on pushing countries to take responsibility for their citizens.

“It must be clear that all individuals who are suspected of crimes — whatever their country of origin, and whatever the nature of the crime — should face investigation and prosecution, with due process guarantees,” said Michelle Bachelet, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, in June 2019.

“Foreign family members should be repatriated, unless they are to be prosecuted for crimes in accordance with international standards,” she added.

The UK is currently debating what to do about those who left the country to join ISIS. In February 2019, it stripped British-born Shamima Begum, who traveled to Syria to become an ISIS bride at the age of 15, of her citizenship, citing national security risks. Begum has appealed the decision, and the UK government is said to be considering options for repatriating British members of ISIS held in prison camps in Syria.

As the West works through the complicated process of absorbing foreign fighters, Islamic State militants in Syria appear to be taking advantage of the chaos.

Last month, the SDF said ISIS fighters committed three suicide bombings on its positions in Raqqa as Kurdish fighters moved from their posts to respond to Turkish assault. And SDF General Mazloum Kobani has warned on Nov. 13, 2019 that the West should “expect” major attacks from Islamic State fighters who may be looking to capitalize on the chaos in order to regroup.

“The danger of the resurgence of ISIS is very big. And it’s a serious danger,” he told Sky News.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

5 ways you’re ‘creeping’ way too hard while at the gym

For most people, going to the gym is a safe place for people to work out and burn off stress. Unfortunately, not all gym goers show up for the right reasons. They show up to watch others break a sweat and find an angle to hit on people.

Now, it’s okay to meet and interact with other patrons while you’re at the gym. In fact, it’s recommended for everybody to open lines of communication when the situation presents itself. However, there are definitely people that don’t know how to find ways of producing normal interactions.

Instead, they watch people they’re attracted to from far away, looking for an excuse to start up a conversation or any type of communication. These are called “gym creepers.” Although they tend to work out every so often, their mission is to hit on every person they find attractive — until someone gives in.

Most gym creepers don’t even know they’ve been secretly given that title. So we came up with a list to let you know if you’re one of them.


Also Read: 5 of the stupidest diseases you can develop at the gym

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F3o7TKux9s2UOnrdlQI.gif&ho=https%3A%2F%2Fi.giphy.com&s=222&h=8653c27e14924f4c6a1831279d844ad48b7fdd978a319fc62ce81fcd3d6fddc0&size=980x&c=225550062 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F3o7TKux9s2UOnrdlQI.gif%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fi.giphy.com%26s%3D222%26h%3D8653c27e14924f4c6a1831279d844ad48b7fdd978a319fc62ce81fcd3d6fddc0%26size%3D980x%26c%3D225550062%22%7D” expand=1]

Flirting with the gym staff

When you first enter the gym, you’re usually greeted by a staff member at the check-in desk. It’s their job to be as helpful as possible. This doesn’t mean you should start flirting with them immediately because they smiled at you when you entered.

There is nothing wrong with carrying on a light conversation with one of them, however, if you continually become a chatterbox every time you see them because you think you’ll eventually score a date — you might be a gym creeper.

Staring at people in the mirror

This is one of the ultimate signs you’re a gym creeper. If you’re lifting weights and roll your eyes in the direction where a cute guy or girl is workout via the mirror, there is a good chance you’re gym creeping. It’s okay to look at an attractive person once in a while during a rest period, but when you start staring, that’s when things can get weird.

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FsJHSTHmE6NTX2.gif&ho=https%3A%2F%2Fi.giphy.com&s=953&h=4986f644ddc4a3f23954c34267abbe1771770349b31be8c59f7dce48c4fbf03f&size=980x&c=1116235356 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FsJHSTHmE6NTX2.gif%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fi.giphy.com%26s%3D953%26h%3D4986f644ddc4a3f23954c34267abbe1771770349b31be8c59f7dce48c4fbf03f%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1116235356%22%7D” expand=1]

Using the gym’s machines to follow someone

People in the gym are highly mobile as they move from one workout station to the other. That’s pretty standard. If a good-looking gym patron that was working next to you gets up and travels to a new area to continue their exercises and you follow them to stay close, you might be a gym creeper.

Most people will get a pass if this minor stalking occurs once or maybe twice. But when it continues from area-to-area, you’re definitely a gym creeper.

Asking your gym crush random questions

Some people will do practically anything to get a chance to talk to their gym crushes. But, unless that moment happens naturally, it’s pretty awkward to walk up to them with a random question.

“Do you lift here often?”

Yes, they do. And yes, they’ve heard that question before. Cue eye-rolls from everyone else nearby.

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FfJj0bgjqzAMUw.gif&ho=https%3A%2F%2Fi.giphy.com&s=845&h=27deaf2ed556fb997c1686eb530ef6c33b30a265f83e32331da9e10ef5b98794&size=980x&c=4161692141 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FfJj0bgjqzAMUw.gif%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fi.giphy.com%26s%3D845%26h%3D27deaf2ed556fb997c1686eb530ef6c33b30a265f83e32331da9e10ef5b98794%26size%3D980x%26c%3D4161692141%22%7D” expand=1]

Endless staring

You remember the people who use the mirror to stare at the hot guy or gal as they workout? Well, this gym creeper doesn’t even use a damn mirror, they just f*cking stare directly.

It is sad to watch, but it’s still pretty funny to see.

MIGHTY HISTORY

‘Executions at midnight’ weren’t really a thing

Michael F. asks: Are executions really held at midnight like shown in the movies? If so, why?

By the time Rainey Bethea was executed on Aug. 14, 1936, most of the United States had ceased executing people publicly. However, in Kentucky in 1936 an execution could still be held publicly and, according to the jury at his trial, Bethea deserved such an end, though not without controversy given the fact that the whole thing from murder to scheduled hanging took place in only about two months. On top of that, this was the case of a young black man who had previously only been convicted of a few minor, non-violent crimes being sentenced to death for rape and murder without any real defense on his behalf. He also claimed the confessions he gave were given under coercion. Whatever the case, the jury deliberated for less than five minutes and returned with the sentence of death by hanging, a mere three weeks after the crime was committed.


Approximately 20,000 people gathered around the gallows to witness the execution. When the time came, the trap door was opened and the rope snapped Bethea’s neck. After 14 minutes, his body was taken down and he was confirmed dead. This was the last public hanging ever performed in the United States.

So what does any of this have to do with executions being held at midnight? While a common Hollywood trope is the classic execution at midnight, it turns out for most all of history, this really wasn’t a thing. As with the case of Bethea, executions were largely a public spectacle and, outside of mob murders, people weren’t exactly keen on gathering at night to watch someone be killed; so executions tended to occur at more civilized hours.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

(Flickr photo by Alan Levine)

Interestingly, the fact that people preferred day time executions actually appears to be one of the chief reasons executions were, for a time in the United States, initially switched to late night, giving us the Hollywood trope that has largely endured to this day.

The earliest examples of this change occurred in the late 19th century as certain states began looking to curtail the spectacle that was public executions. As professor John Bessler of the University of Baltimore School of Law states, “There was pickpocketing at these public executions, thefts and sometimes violence. They were trying to get rid of the mob atmosphere that attended these public executions.”

The fix was easy — simply move the execution time to an hour when most people are sleeping, getting rid of the boisterous crowds and accompanying extra media coverage.

Now, given the switch to banning public executions completely, you might at this point be wondering why the nighttime time slot endured and became popular enough for a time to become a common trope?

One of the principal reasons often cited is simply to cut down on potential for more red tape in certain cases. While there are exceptions, in many states in the U.S. death warrants were, and in some cases still are, only legal for one day. If the execution is not carried out on the specified date, another warrant would be required which, as you might imagine for something as serious as killing someone legally (and ensuring the executioner cannot be charged for murder), this is a lot of paperwork and not always a guarantee. By starting at midnight, it gives the full 24 hours to work through potential temporary stays of execution, if any, before the time slot has ended and a new death warrant must be procured.

That said, perhaps more importantly, and a reason cited by many a prison official, is simply the matter of staffing. Executions performed at the dead of night see the inmates locked up in their cells, with minimal guard presence needed. Thus, prison workers don’t have to worry about any potential issues with the inmate populace during an execution. Further, some normal staff can easily be diverted to handling various aspects of a nighttime execution without taxing the available worker pool, a key benefit given prison systems are notoriously understaffed in the United States.

All this said, contrary to popular belief, midnight executions are not really much of a thing anymore. There are a variety of reasons for this, but principally this is as a courtesy for the various people processing and working on the appeals. For example, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor notes, “Dispensing justice at that hour of the morning is difficult, to say the least, and we have an obligation … to give our best efforts in every one of these instances.”

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

(Flickr photo by kyle tsui)

Arguments for a switch in time slot have also been made on behalf of the loved ones of both the condemned and victims. These people were formerly made to arrive a couple hours before the execution at midnight, and would then have to stay until after it was carried out if they wanted to witness it. Even with no delays, this tended to see them not processed out the door until a few hours after midnight. And if there were temporary stays of execution, they might have to skip a night’s sleep to be sure they were there to watch someone, perhaps a loved one or potentially the opposite, die.

There is also the issue of overtime. While ease of staffing is generally listed as a positive reason for late night executions, it turns out that as states began to move the executions into the light of day again, issues with the other inmates during daytime executions never really manifested, while overtime costs to keep the necessary staff on hand to process the execution at night were not trivial. For example, in the execution of Douglas Franklin Wright in 1996, staff assigned to the execution cost just shy of an extra ,000 (about ,000 today) in overtime compared to if the execution had been carried out in the daytime. Some prisons have also taken to simply implementing special modified lockdown procedures during executions to free up normal staff while reducing the risk of issues with the rest of the inmates.

What about the potential paperwork problem? This has easily been worked around by many states who’ve moved to daytime executions. For example, in Missouri they just switched the time limit to 24 hours, regardless of date. What matters is just the starting time. Other states simply have moved to longer periods like a week or ten days granted for such a warrant.

Thus, contrary to what is often depicted in films, midnight executions have gone the way of the dodo in the United States, though there are a few places in the world that still prefer to execute people in darkness. For example, in India executions are typically carried out before sunrise, with the stated reasoning being staffing convenience — as was the case in the U.S., at these hours more staff are available to handle the execution before normal daily activities begin.

Bonus Fact:

  • Botched executions are surprisingly common, for example occurring in about 7% of all executions in the United States. Historically, between 1890 and 2010 in the United States, 276 executions were messed up in some way, sometimes dramatically. One young black teen, who very much appears to have been innocent of the crime he was convicted of, even had to be sent to the electric chair twice. After the first attempt at killing him failed and he had to be brought back to his cell, the subsequent controversy over whether it was legal to try to kill him again brought to light the fact that there really wasn’t any evidence against him other than a forced confession. We’ll have more on this in an upcoming episode of our podcast The BrainFood Show, which you can subscribe to here: (iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, Feed)

This article originally appeared on Today I Found Out. Follow @TodayIFoundOut on Twitter.

MIGHTY HISTORY

7 things you didn’t know about Wyatt Earp and his famous gunfight

No doubt about it, the Wild West is an evocative era in American history. This period of frontier expansion is synonymous with rowdy saloons, cowboys, suspenseful shootouts, and of course, the ever-present tumbleweed. Within this lawless atmosphere, the infamous 1881 gunfight at the O.K. Corral took place. Although it was a real historical event, the showdown between Wyatt Earp and the Cochise County Cowboys checks off every element of a good spaghetti western film.

Here are the basic facts: Approximately 30 shots were fired in the standoff between law enforcement and the group of outlaws known as the Cochise County Cowboys. The altercation left three cowboys dead and two lawmen wounded in the mining boomtown of Tombstone, Arizona Territory. However, the passage of time has meshed fact with legend. We’re here to set the record straight. Here are seven little-known facts about the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.


7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

1. The gunfight did not actually take place at the O.K. Corral.

Nope, the shootout didn’t happen inside or even next to the eponymous corral. Shots were exchanged in a vacant lot on Fremont Street, down the road from the corral’s rear entrance.

This common mistake can be attributed to the 1957 film, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. The movie made the shootout famous, but it was rather loose with the facts. (As for why the movie-makers decided on a location change, we’re guessing it’s because Gunfight at the O.K. Corral sounds more glamorous than Gunfight at the Vacant Lot on Fremont Street.) The corral still exists today, but instead of a business renting out horses and wagons, it’s a part of Tombstone’s historic district, where people can pay to watch reenactments of the gunfight.

2. The police may not have been the good guys.

There isn’t much room for moral ambiguity in standard depictions of the Old West. You have your bad guys (violent, lawless thieves) and your good guys (law-abiding sheriffs who try to protect the town). However, historians aren’t so sure what went down during the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

The Earp brothers and their friend Doc Holliday claimed afterwards that they were trying to disarm the cowboys, who were illegally carrying firearms when the cowboys opened fire. The surviving cowboys alleged that they were fully cooperating and had even raised their hands in the air when the lawmen started indiscriminately shooting them at point blank range. Alliances were strong in the small town–newspapers were not above taking sides, and witnesses of the scuffle gave conflicting testimony. To further complicate matters, the transcript of the ensuing murder trial was destroyed in a fire. All in all, we may never know for sure who provoked the shootout.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

3. Wyatt Earp wasn’t really the hero of the shootout.

Wyatt Earp went down in history as the central figure of the gunfight. In reality, his brother Virgil was far more experienced than him in combat and shootout situations. Virgil had served in The Civil War and had a long career in law enforcement compared to Wyatt, who had a shorter stint in law enforcement and was even fired from one position.

However, Wyatt gained fame when a biography, Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal, was published in 1931, two years after its subject’s death. Riddled with exaggerations, to the point that it was more fiction that actual biography, the book portrayed Wyatt as the deadliest and most feared shooter in the Old West. Another contributing factor to his notoriety was the fact that unlike his fellow lawmen in the O.K. Corral shootout, Wyatt wasn’t injured or killed. Nor was he harmed in any of the ensuing fights. His close calls in the face of death only added to his mystique. Which brings us to our next point …

4. The gunfight at the O.K. Corral was only a small part of the long feud between the Earps & the cowboys.

Tension was simmering between the cowboys and the Earps long before gunfire erupted. Naturally, the fact that the Cochise County Cowboys made their living through smuggling and thievery ruffled a few feathers with town marshal Virgil Earp. The cowboys were implicated in several robberies and murders. The Earps promised justice, to which the cowboys responded that they were being persecuted without evidence. Death threats were exchanged.

The gunfight wasn’t the end of the enmity between these men either. The surviving cowboys were believed to have organized the assassination of Morgan Earp and a murder attempt on Virgil that left him permanently disabled.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

5. Wyatt Earp wasn’t always on the right side of the law.

And he definitely wasn’t the infallible hero later accounts made him out to be. Earp was apparently heavily affected by his first wife’s death and started acting out. Before moving to Tombstone, he faced a series of lawsuits alleging that he stole money and falsified court documents. He was also arrested for stealing a horse and escaped from jail before his trial. Later, he was arrested and fined for frequenting brothels. Rumors were abound that he was a pimp.

Earp tried to turn things around for himself and got a job on the police force in Wichita, Kansas. However, he was fired after getting into a fistfight. Luckily for him, it was pretty easy to wipe the slate clean for yourself in those days. He could simply pack his bags and head to a new town like Tombstone, where he could start with a fresh reputation.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

6. The gunfight only lasted 30 seconds.

Yup, the dramatic confrontation that left three men dead and three wounded lasted less than a minute. In that span, around 30 shots were fired. The movie Gunfight at the O.K. Corraldramatized the shootout, showing the men heavily armed and engaged in a fight that spanned minutes. In reality, each man carried only a revolver apiece and in the confusion, nobody could be sure who fired the fatal shots.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

7. Many of the townspeople sympathized with the cowboys.

You would think the people of Tombstone would regard the Earps as their heroes for driving out the outlaws. Not so. Public opinion was divided over the matter, especially after Cochise County Sheriff Johnny Behan testified in court that he witnessed the cowboys try to surrender peacefully.

However, even the sheriff had loyalties in this small town. Virgil Earp had clashed with Behan on several other occasions, claiming that he turned a blind eye to the cowboys’ illegal activities and was sympathetic to the criminals. Additionally, Wyatt Earp’s common-law wife, Josephine Earp, had lived with Behan for two years before entering a relationship with Earp. She left Behan after finding him in bed with another woman, but no doubt this contributed to the animosity betweens the Earps and Behan.

Also read: This Civil War vet was the real hero of the O.K. Corral shootout

This article originally appeared on Explore The Archive. Follow @explore_archive on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Kill and Survive: A stealth pilot’s guide to excellence

U.S. Air Force pilot Bill Crawford is a stealth pilot, someone who has risen to the very top of an extremely challenging field. But to hear him tell it, it can all be chalked up to a very simple secret, a secret that will sound familiar to anyone who has served in the military.


Kill and Survive: A Stealth Pilot’s Secrets of Success | Bill Crawford | TEDxRexburg

www.youtube.com

His trick is becoming the best in the world, studying and refining himself and his processes until he’s above whatever cutoff he needs to clear. And that includes the time in college when he learned that the Air Force was cutting fighter pilot training slots from about 1,000 a year to 100 per year. In order to make sure he cleared the cutoff, Crawford became the best.

Not the 100th best, not the 10th. He received a scholarship that year for being the single best.

And he wants everyone to have the chance to be the best in the world at whatever it is they do.

In his TEDx talk, Crawford talks about bombing Baghdad, conducting inflight refuelings, and, most importantly, conducting the post-mission debrief. The after-action review.

And, yeah, that’s a big part of Crawford’s secret. As anyone in the military can tell you, all the branches have some sort of process for reviewing mission performance and success (two different things) from any operation. Crawford’s version from his Air Force career is asking five questions:

  1. What happened?
  2. What went right?
  3. What went wrong?
  4. Why?
  5. Lessons learned?

The Army had a slightly different version. What was supposed to happen? What did happen? Why? What should we, as a team, sustain about that performance? What should we change? But all the branches have some version of this process.

And this self-review is key to understanding modern military success. If you look at old articles from the Russian invasion of Georgia in 2008, plenty of hand-wringing in the West was about the pain, death, and destruction Russia inflicted, but many military leaders worried about Russia’s review process after the invasion.

That’s because the most successful organizations and individuals define their processes and actively assess whether or not they are doing it the best way they can. Russia hadn’t historically reviewed their successes all that deeply. But they decisively won the war on the ground in Georgia in five days, then they reviewed their success for how to do better.

And that meant that they wanted to improve their processes. Crawford wants everyone to learn to do that process in their own life just like the American military has for decades, and Russia now does as well. And the process is simple.

But it’s also hard to do. Crawford and his team had to do their debrief from bombing Baghdad right after they landed. So, right after completing 40-hours of flying and bombing, they had to go sit in a room and discuss their process, their success, and what they could do better.

But if you can make yourself do all that, you’re more likely to get better. And if you keep getting better, you’ll be the best.

MIGHTY MOVIES

5 reasons why Hawkeye is the most effective Avenger

Look, I don’t like him either. You think I wanted Black Widow to be the one who couldn’t be revived in Avengers: Endgame? If anything I wish Hawkeye could have died twice – or better yet, a million times while trying to cut a bargain with Dormammu. Unlike Dormammu, I would never get tired of that. Unfortunately, if we were all caught with Hawkeye somehow being away from the Avengers for all eternity, they would cease to be an effective fighting force.


I won’t even get into how one man took down cartels, terrorists, and gangsters worldwide.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Hawkward.

1. The Avengers are 7-0 with Hawkeye

This is probably the most important reason. As one aptly-named Redditor pointed out, while some of you might believe this is coincidence or luck, they are also 0-4 in battle without Hawkeye. Why did Thanos win in Infinity War? I’m not saying it wasn’t because Hawkeye wasn’t there but I’m also not ruling it out.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Black Panther is wearing a Vibranium suit and Hawkeye is fighting him with a stick while wearing a t-shirt.

2. Hawkeye is fundamentally better than every other Avenger

Is Hawkeye a demi-god? No. Does he have billions of dollars? No. Sorcery? Super Serum? A metal body? No, no, no. Hawkeye is a guy, just some dude, who sees really, really well. Let’s see if skinny Steve Rogers can get punched in the face by Thanos all day. We’ve already seen what happens when Tony Stark is wearing Tom Ford and not Iron Man. Even though he basically just wears clothes and shoots a bow and arrow (albeit with some trick arrows), he’s still flying around in space, fighting aliens, and taking on killer robots.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

At least you know one of them can help with the mortgage.

3. Hawkeye is the glue that keeps the Avengers together

Where did the Avengers go when their chips were down? Hawkeye’s house. Where even his wife had to point out what a freaking mess they all were. He recruited Black Widow and turned arguably the most powerful Avenger – Scarlet Witch – into a real sorcerer just by pointing out that he was fighting an army of robots with a bow and arrow because that is his job.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Hawkeye: 1, Avengers: 0

4. The Avengers are lost without Hawkeye

Literally. The one time Hawkeye was actually playing for the other team, he just completely kicked the crap out of them. Agent Coulson got killed and two of the more powerful Avengers were spread into the wind. He’s lucky Natasha hit him in the head with a railing because there’s no way they’d have beaten Loki – or even come together as a team – without Hawkeye. Hawkeye became the Avengers command and control center, turning a bunch of riff-raff into a coordinated fighting force.

Even when pitting Hawkeye against Wave II Avengers, there’s still no comparison. He tases Scarlet Witch and gets the upper hand against Quicksilver.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

“You exist because I let you.”

5. At least two of the Avengers are alive because Hawkeye let them live

One of the first clues we get to Black Widow and Hawkeye’s shared past is that Hawkeye was supposed to kill her and decided to recruit her for S.H.I.E.L.D instead. When Thor was powerless in New Mexico, Agent Coulson decided to send another agent in to stop the God of Thunder, who was just mowing down his S.H.I.E.L.D. agents. Hawkeye, instead of ending Thor, Hawkeye let him live.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Bonus: Hawkeye does sh*t other Avengers barely pull off, if at all

In Endgame, Spider-Man in a powered suit is overcome by Thanos’ forces. Captain Marvel in all her glory eventually gets taken down. Meanwhile, Hawkeye is running through tunnels and rubble away from crawling doom carrying the Infinity Gauntlet, simply handing it off to the Black Panther.

For the record, he’s also the only Avenger to hold an Infinity Stone and not whine about it endlessly. After seeing Hawkeye throw Cap’s shield, I’m pretty sure he was also pretending he couldn’t pick up Thor’s hammer.

Lists

8 reasons being in the military is like being in a sorority

Sorority houses and military barracks couldn’t be more different… at least that’s what most people think. In less than six weeks, you can go from living in a beautiful Victorian home, adorned with Greek letters, on a corner of a college campus to settling into James Hall at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May.


7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The two seem vastly dissimilar, but you will find there are quite a few similarities, no matter how much anyone wants to deny it. Here are just a few things you’ll find familiar when joining the military right after college.

1. You share everything

Barracks or sorority house, someone is always trying to borrow something from you — your printer, your tools, your computer, your DVDs… Just no one in the military has asked me to borrow my Lilly Pulitzer scarf.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Yet.

2. They both have their own unique culture

Each Greek organization and each military branch has official colors, symbols, and values, like the EGA of the Marine Corps, the grey and gold of the Navy, and the “Integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do” core values of the Air Force.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Or the Army Flat Top haircut.

You can go from green to blue, from a teddy bear and dagger to a shield and anchors, and from “Honorable, Beautiful, Highest” to “Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty,” and still find the simple things that tie organizations together to be remarkably similar.

3. Getting masted is a lot like a military standards board meeting

You sit awkwardly in a group of people who are upset by what you did and you have to try to talk your way out of getting kicked out of the organization.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Sounds familiar.

Alcohol and bad decisions were usually involved. You’ll take a punishment, fine, but you just don’t want to be banned forever.

4. Recruitment is a grueling process 

Once you’re accepted into a sorority, there is usually a long process of staying up late and deciding on who does and doesn’t join your chapter. In the military, everyone dreads recruiting. Recruiters are seen as people that you have to deal with, not that you want to deal with.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Prepare yourself for the worst bid day ever.

If they want you, they’re there to get you into the branch any way they can. If they don’t want you, good luck trying because you aren’t getting in.

5. You join a large family

It is truly a sisterhood or brotherhood. The ties that bind sorority sisters are the same as those that bind a Coastie to her brothers-in-arms. You know you will never stand alone, on a battlefield or during hard times in life.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Except in the military, everyone is armed.

6. Sibling rivalry is everywhere

Just like blood relatives, you fight like cats and dogs, make fun of each other, and give one another a hard time, but no outsider can hurt your siblings. Whether it’s a bar fight, simple teasing, or anything in between, no one gets to be mean to your sisters or brothers except you.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
During the Army-Navy Game, all bets are off.

7. There are people you like — and people you don’t

You’re going to have to live with people you didn’t pick, and it can be amazing or awful. Life with 26 other women is not the most fun you can have, but you’ll do it all over again by joining the military after college. Though military roommates may not understand your past sorority life, they are exactly the same: They will tell you how your hair and makeup looks and if your uniform looks good.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’
Some sororities even have someone to yell the regulations in their members’ faces. (U.S. Navy photo by Brian Walsh)

8. It gives you a unique identity

The motto of sorority women everywhere is, “it’s not four years, it’s for life.” The Marines have, “once a Marine, always a Marine.” The other branches never give up their identity as veterans. Even though it wasn’t an easy transition, I left college and my sisters and gained a whole new family.

My sisters were still at my boot camp graduation and my Coast Guard family has been there the whole ride. To quote a letter I once received from another Coastie,

Your Coast Guard family is always here for you.
MIGHTY HISTORY

The original ‘Memphis Belle’ is now restored and on display

The Memphis Belle has received a lot of attention over the years. In 1944, this Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber was the subject of a documentary, entitled Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress, that followed an aircrew as they completed their 25th and final mission. Today, we now know that the Memphis Belle was actually the second choice for that documentary — the first was shot down in battle.

Nonetheless, the Memphis Belle was thrust into notoriety and had a place in the public eye. Then, in 1990, that documentary was dramatized and turned into a film, titled Memphis Belle, starring Harry Connick Jr.

Now, you can see the famous bomber itself at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio. The bomber’s display was formally opened on May 17, 2018, which marked the 75th anniversary of the plane’s 25th mission. But this B-17 bomber endured a long journey before finally arriving at the museum.


7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The Memphis Belle being restored at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. In the background is Swoose, another historic B-17.

(USAF)

According to an Air Force release, restoring the bomber has taken over 55,000 man-hours since 2005. She was saved from the scrapyard by the city of Memphis for a grand total of 0 in 1945. After that, the plane spent most of her days stored outside, left exposed to the elements, as she awaited proper preservation. In 2004, the Air Force reclaimed the bomber.

Still, 55,000 hours is a long restoration period — what took so long? Well, the experts weren’t interested in plastering on a pretty paint job and calling it done. Instead, they wanted this iconic plane to look exactly as it did when she flew that famous 25th mission. That was no easy task. One of the hardest parts was finding authentic parts for the plane, or at least period-accurate parts.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The Memphis Belle as she appeared during World War II.

(USAF)

The Memphis Belle, a Boeing B-17F Flying Fortress, was able to carry as many as 17,600 pounds’ worth of bombs and was equipped with as many as 13 M2 .50-caliber machine guns as well as a single .30-caliber machine gun. It had a crew of ten, a top speed of 325 miles per hour, and a maximum range of 4,420 miles.

Of the over 3,400 B-17Fs built, only three survive today — the Memphis Belle is one of those.

popular

Why China flying bombers around Taiwan is both routine and a big deal

As you were busy buying big bags of charcoal and forming hamburger patties in preparation for a Memorial Day cookout, the Chinese flew nuclear-capable bombers around Taiwan. This sort of passive aggression isn’t anything new — it happens pretty often, so it’s not a big deal to most of us. But for the island of Taiwan, seeing two H-6 Badgers fly overhead is certainly cause for concern.


China carried out a similar orbit of the so-called “Nine-Dash Line” using a Badger shortly after the freshly-elected President Trump took a congratulatory call from the Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen in 2016. China has been seeking to isolate Taiwan, which it views as a renegade province, and has forced a number of countries, the latest being Burkina Faso, to end diplomatic relations with island nation.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

Republic of China Air Force AIDC F-CK-1 Ching-kuo fighters scrambled to intercept the Badgers.

(Photo by Toshiro Aoki)

In potential hot spots, like Taiwan or the South China Sea, “training missions” like these are often used to probe opposing forces — and the tactic isn’t exclusive to China. The United States prefers the deceptively innocuous term “freedom of navigation exercises” for similar missions, which are conducted by ships or aircraft. On rare occasions, such passive provocations can devolve into shootouts.

On three instances in the 1980s, American forces ended up in combat with the Libyan regime of Muammar Qaddafi. In 1981, two F-14 Tomcats shot down Libyan Su-22 Fitters after taking enemy fire. 1986 saw extensive naval combat that resulted in the sinking of two Libyan missile boats. In 1989, two F-14s shot down two MiG-23 Floggers.

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The 1986 freedom of navigation exercises in the Gulf of Sidra led to a sharp naval engagement, in which this Nanuchka-class corvette was sunk.

(U.S. Navy)

This may be a routine practice, but historical precedent also makes it a big deal. China may not be aggressing on Taiwan outright, but should Taiwan react forcefully, the fallout could be deadly.

MIGHTY CULTURE

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of April 20

The stimulus checks have started to appear in everyone’s bank accounts and we’re sure they’re on the way if they’re going through mail. On one hand, it’s fantastic news for the folks that have been hit hard financially by the coronavirus. Hell, we all kind of need it after paying rent last week.

But there’s a little voice in the back of my head telling me that not everyone’s going to spend it on rent, utilities, essential groceries or whathaveyou, and wonder where it all went. Maybe it’s because I saw way too many young troops look at their clothing allowance as beer money…

Don’t worry if you’re like 99% of lower enlisted seeing a comma in their bank account. At least these memes won’t cost you a cent!


[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FvXnZPpypAh0HNQ-nKg-mbbnNco-B3g1KLpmObIjzBtCzuEpd8ywca9GhjmFMN6aiSK0_CSLdTt3Lv3YKVfUELOF2nmDGqLrUioDvKytk2w5F6wmtw7zLCkoLgBCJb3FOCIxkWSc4OQAVi4khiQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=965&h=6bd7bbaa96d42eb4ea50239592561f0a4d6cc2e767b80961cac7b17fa2b47f2b&size=980x&c=482059744 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FvXnZPpypAh0HNQ-nKg-mbbnNco-B3g1KLpmObIjzBtCzuEpd8ywca9GhjmFMN6aiSK0_CSLdTt3Lv3YKVfUELOF2nmDGqLrUioDvKytk2w5F6wmtw7zLCkoLgBCJb3FOCIxkWSc4OQAVi4khiQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D965%26h%3D6bd7bbaa96d42eb4ea50239592561f0a4d6cc2e767b80961cac7b17fa2b47f2b%26size%3D980x%26c%3D482059744%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via SFC Majestic)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FC-NLENklMdGoFHYyou4sjQR-aVRXQlmaELZ5y3y8kwbuDkDuGcLHSeGHCv862ZolWzJUyVDmEuqe43qBBexz9oA1ZpEuw7Zdhv9Qq05cAfYI3r6DYnJ-PRNwibF6U-MVGQ8yi52sHACEIYTrsQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=21&h=7a157989fbf18dc3fc611cc518a968f54386987fb974f533b86b06afa653659b&size=980x&c=2589121755 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FC-NLENklMdGoFHYyou4sjQR-aVRXQlmaELZ5y3y8kwbuDkDuGcLHSeGHCv862ZolWzJUyVDmEuqe43qBBexz9oA1ZpEuw7Zdhv9Qq05cAfYI3r6DYnJ-PRNwibF6U-MVGQ8yi52sHACEIYTrsQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D21%26h%3D7a157989fbf18dc3fc611cc518a968f54386987fb974f533b86b06afa653659b%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2589121755%22%7D” expand=1][rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FmdPysMH8Y3PdSs4Gb19JbHKJdNXwOa-sRj68A_iX2ZuFhDP9Oxg_e2A-7vdj3jcjbCMGz5_Jj5g7a4_ZSu-QE03yQqI7u53ZYLa8osvQmrKbfA1LhiDLERZE0Piq2I43Tnz0jKm6epwoa6xctQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=898&h=39a2afac097b7067e2bca64318abd48290df625b7f1d3f44473e44f8183d23f9&size=980x&c=1087067139 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FmdPysMH8Y3PdSs4Gb19JbHKJdNXwOa-sRj68A_iX2ZuFhDP9Oxg_e2A-7vdj3jcjbCMGz5_Jj5g7a4_ZSu-QE03yQqI7u53ZYLa8osvQmrKbfA1LhiDLERZE0Piq2I43Tnz0jKm6epwoa6xctQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D898%26h%3D39a2afac097b7067e2bca64318abd48290df625b7f1d3f44473e44f8183d23f9%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1087067139%22%7D” expand=1]

lh5.googleusercontent.com

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F1UEH183jhXuEAV9ZaeeeoPWfWkACXKwEImgu46Bcferz9ebxuHprfoBiTCfKJCe7kBiedxKZW0IgRT4BpYd5U7aepj4T5ufG74RowNeCaTBlnjyGZIEDk7PwGn4eoeWIqpXuOiFbwgo0uDyJMA&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=785&h=142dcc3dae9358a9c33c4865d1f3d04b4b0b5ef00dc09314096f6ba8df86f196&size=980x&c=2637130165 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F1UEH183jhXuEAV9ZaeeeoPWfWkACXKwEImgu46Bcferz9ebxuHprfoBiTCfKJCe7kBiedxKZW0IgRT4BpYd5U7aepj4T5ufG74RowNeCaTBlnjyGZIEDk7PwGn4eoeWIqpXuOiFbwgo0uDyJMA%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D785%26h%3D142dcc3dae9358a9c33c4865d1f3d04b4b0b5ef00dc09314096f6ba8df86f196%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2637130165%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via US Army WTF Moments Memes)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FH3p0bE1kYMwVtwUFFWBacLmsrgMmwUXhaQvWMA9upfhPV4SBb7LDg22UH4j5xeFbE84iJ6GDA08eS0YhmoKUFXdA0QGTD4rfImjm17hpZLKaXUXr2fs49nY28pF4JcF-lIbXQV8qWsaVW55oxQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=965&h=f79fcf06d47955fdf674dc9c2799c68a9cbdba8828273e0947dd52d73cdc6f62&size=980x&c=1178492016 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FH3p0bE1kYMwVtwUFFWBacLmsrgMmwUXhaQvWMA9upfhPV4SBb7LDg22UH4j5xeFbE84iJ6GDA08eS0YhmoKUFXdA0QGTD4rfImjm17hpZLKaXUXr2fs49nY28pF4JcF-lIbXQV8qWsaVW55oxQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D965%26h%3Df79fcf06d47955fdf674dc9c2799c68a9cbdba8828273e0947dd52d73cdc6f62%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1178492016%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Call for Fire)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FH9T5h84Rxj3GqHO2NwMxOXZiyWIjEAAcZHyC7OgMbTbjb_ocdqeDF1cmfzS4TzCtF65EldXqgFTkYi8mlpE6t10o_ghfUU3RWDVGY3A9aeARqc0InHCQqUkSzmVKkkd8rmU75g5wqaEiWbV9kg&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=489&h=bda7074c73a34948c4fadf6c7d640f8e53593ecba6c5b049f8a6b9e03a595713&size=980x&c=773991509 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FH9T5h84Rxj3GqHO2NwMxOXZiyWIjEAAcZHyC7OgMbTbjb_ocdqeDF1cmfzS4TzCtF65EldXqgFTkYi8mlpE6t10o_ghfUU3RWDVGY3A9aeARqc0InHCQqUkSzmVKkkd8rmU75g5wqaEiWbV9kg%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D489%26h%3Dbda7074c73a34948c4fadf6c7d640f8e53593ecba6c5b049f8a6b9e03a595713%26size%3D980x%26c%3D773991509%22%7D” expand=1]

(Comic by Claw of Knowledge)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FfQVk8okzqO7O6SOtu1A-BR4ApfJb-s8C3bN-RdX7v0kXfai2ztcHNHaH6pR6VqLr4cmWPpVvlY8ERrPJ-ooZa9y6KFNkPKV4ut6nukNq4wlnJuFVO2Vfpgf0f468CPvjiUMdxWa0ZlhoED0GXw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=806&h=4994d36353c07907ad5ce5fd4f1367d422e8aa764954ad24445014b2b43b22ba&size=980x&c=2433917630 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FfQVk8okzqO7O6SOtu1A-BR4ApfJb-s8C3bN-RdX7v0kXfai2ztcHNHaH6pR6VqLr4cmWPpVvlY8ERrPJ-ooZa9y6KFNkPKV4ut6nukNq4wlnJuFVO2Vfpgf0f468CPvjiUMdxWa0ZlhoED0GXw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D806%26h%3D4994d36353c07907ad5ce5fd4f1367d422e8aa764954ad24445014b2b43b22ba%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2433917630%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via The Army’s Fckups)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F_or_8Cu75yYmQbpefSnSiRKY1D4zorT8Aos48CPYJ4C1FJKRMh8P8Fbl9X9EwvxW8fgZvJAVgjSVaczyaXIQ6pen7MUabuHGkl9r6dGE87Iq7qgRXKcfXf8TXxZxn9ZTzpkxP_2-oNRbGkYsww&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=887&h=e5c3f43c885dbe0b5343450b605df0c9aab24a169af512a9867a5c46daad3ee7&size=980x&c=969912412 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F_or_8Cu75yYmQbpefSnSiRKY1D4zorT8Aos48CPYJ4C1FJKRMh8P8Fbl9X9EwvxW8fgZvJAVgjSVaczyaXIQ6pen7MUabuHGkl9r6dGE87Iq7qgRXKcfXf8TXxZxn9ZTzpkxP_2-oNRbGkYsww%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D887%26h%3De5c3f43c885dbe0b5343450b605df0c9aab24a169af512a9867a5c46daad3ee7%26size%3D980x%26c%3D969912412%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Hooah My Ass Off)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FGwJuPdFyi255MQiCvEzCTQom33pDFDIG6IfUtgFqMKzI4RNvaWjlghU-oHjC7RWEPdlE9FVYcFBfYZENh1ZCgQhnVEmbiob6NlOstbYYZ1bDO-b4uMDFEhy5Y_f6kfcSlYA4F1juVnUKAZvIyQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=805&h=8ceaa79fd8e556cf35f12cae8f468533706ca3b2a6e8e88facc2a212df8be4b4&size=980x&c=3866751256 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FGwJuPdFyi255MQiCvEzCTQom33pDFDIG6IfUtgFqMKzI4RNvaWjlghU-oHjC7RWEPdlE9FVYcFBfYZENh1ZCgQhnVEmbiob6NlOstbYYZ1bDO-b4uMDFEhy5Y_f6kfcSlYA4F1juVnUKAZvIyQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D805%26h%3D8ceaa79fd8e556cf35f12cae8f468533706ca3b2a6e8e88facc2a212df8be4b4%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3866751256%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Valhalla Wear)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FpHZacP0aiZgx2nMQ0PgwQx7B6ZbteYmYTZ-FDgEnz5zg6kXOmJiPM73RrvHECanTKOFtNq42ZQdf7oWr2Zz5WkEBCulSmlWOSs5FnXEtGod5s5fep86HITEuV2E4nT0_vsBiCyzQVz_55LCC6Q&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=658&h=d093ce343240c81eef0e2bc06d333db8adc767f39db6714ff46e43a550d15736&size=980x&c=1568210314 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FpHZacP0aiZgx2nMQ0PgwQx7B6ZbteYmYTZ-FDgEnz5zg6kXOmJiPM73RrvHECanTKOFtNq42ZQdf7oWr2Zz5WkEBCulSmlWOSs5FnXEtGod5s5fep86HITEuV2E4nT0_vsBiCyzQVz_55LCC6Q%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D658%26h%3Dd093ce343240c81eef0e2bc06d333db8adc767f39db6714ff46e43a550d15736%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1568210314%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via ASMDSS)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FpsQvxtMopYQWaHdfVzu49Dr2Hz4MOUzm4ciT6pNv6LU57RHEDSTWjWl9_E-CY06FUVb2ANXIQoo2JXXMEWuIoMEHD2eF20hx12QJt9J68LBOwli9x-Gax3Rh7BRsJuuCPz-JO42BUPbiqngWjw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=448&h=26b8dc49299517544f1c2a10ada8b2f1e3a6be2109078a12cc0adb64621a9f3b&size=980x&c=1825766325 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FpsQvxtMopYQWaHdfVzu49Dr2Hz4MOUzm4ciT6pNv6LU57RHEDSTWjWl9_E-CY06FUVb2ANXIQoo2JXXMEWuIoMEHD2eF20hx12QJt9J68LBOwli9x-Gax3Rh7BRsJuuCPz-JO42BUPbiqngWjw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D448%26h%3D26b8dc49299517544f1c2a10ada8b2f1e3a6be2109078a12cc0adb64621a9f3b%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1825766325%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Private News Network)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FbCHjL0sAk9O5-7RzX0pMiN3FpTmAsT0viWw162PWZMyZ1HBgSsYZ6c7CNhQ8NCwaO_JX7Ld-axDABXtZIcnd-XTM44d_u4ELNLAYQBHHydWVBwKqAk4HltPWMiikd2pROr8Zeqy_HNDbrb-__Q&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=353&h=d196d1a37040b20f464f871c408369673a8bcbe6c86ae72848e82eacf8e38a0b&size=980x&c=3442749607 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FbCHjL0sAk9O5-7RzX0pMiN3FpTmAsT0viWw162PWZMyZ1HBgSsYZ6c7CNhQ8NCwaO_JX7Ld-axDABXtZIcnd-XTM44d_u4ELNLAYQBHHydWVBwKqAk4HltPWMiikd2pROr8Zeqy_HNDbrb-__Q%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D353%26h%3Dd196d1a37040b20f464f871c408369673a8bcbe6c86ae72848e82eacf8e38a0b%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3442749607%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Decelerate Your Life)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FbBEdOBLza__89izE8zfI4bngBeqM2_qDxarKB6q296_5QWZhtsnAZxDO6kunKFCkwizcnGtp8Mj617i8VOliu8KDm6ppfFJQihaFGK5brJJeEbj7wqWE5kCQ2bSWY2-tN3PnBDXh5yaSxT6sIg&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=982&h=299d36a10e7f2517810307fbeeefac35f23264eff0c0c5efd37256fe434cb4a3&size=980x&c=2555679938 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FbBEdOBLza__89izE8zfI4bngBeqM2_qDxarKB6q296_5QWZhtsnAZxDO6kunKFCkwizcnGtp8Mj617i8VOliu8KDm6ppfFJQihaFGK5brJJeEbj7wqWE5kCQ2bSWY2-tN3PnBDXh5yaSxT6sIg%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D982%26h%3D299d36a10e7f2517810307fbeeefac35f23264eff0c0c5efd37256fe434cb4a3%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2555679938%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via fuSNCO)

Do Not Sell My Personal Information