MIGHTY HISTORY

4 outstanding things you didn't know about Sgt. York

Known as one of America's greatest war heroes, Alvin York was a profoundly religious man who found himself plenty conflicted when he learned he'd been drafted into the U.S. Army. Although very worried at the prospect of taking another man's life, the Tennessee native chose to honor his military obligation and shipped off.

Although York saved many lives, killed many enemy troops, and earned the Medal of Honor, he gained true nationwide notoriety after Sergeant York, a film about his life, debuted in cinemas.

things you didnt know about sgt york 'Sergeant York' starring Gary Cooper(Warner Brother Pictures)

Not only did the 1941 classic secure York a spot in the history books, it preserved his story and legacy for generations to come. The movie does a great job of showing us the highlights of his wartime heroics, but there are a few things about this humble hero that you probably didn't know.


1. Blind Tigers

Before shipping out to the frontlines to fight, York was considered somewhat of a troublemaker. Although he was known for his marksmanship as a youngster, he was also known to drink and gamble at various bars, known as "Blind Tigers."

Alvin York (as played by Gary Cooper) at a local "Blind Tiger.'

(Warner Brothers Pictures)

2. He wasn't good with money

In his youth, York only attended nine months of a subscription school. In his hometown, education wasn't a priority and he found work as a semi-skilled laborer at a nearby railroad. This lack of education is likely the reason for his poor money-managing skills.

York was known for spending money as he earned it and giving what he had away to those he felt needed it more.

3. York kept a detailed diary

York frequently made entries about his time during World War I, and, in great detail, wrote about what it was like being pinned down by the enemy in attempts to capture a narrow-gauge railroad. The Medal of Honor recipient's diary gives us a glimpse directly into his mind as he explored a range of subjects, from his emotional childhood through to the perils of war.

York's personal diary.

(SgtYork.org)

4. He avoided profiting off his fame

After York's deployment ended, he returned home and his story was published in the Saturday Evening Post — which had an audience of approximately two-million readers. He met with members of Congress who gave him a standing ovation.

As York's name became more famous, he received offers for his movies rights — and he denied them all.

It took many years for Sgt. York to allow for the film's production, Finally, it was released in 1941. York used his earnings to finance a bible school.

Representative Cordell Hull, Sergeant Alvin C. York, Senator Kenneth McKellar, and Senator George E. Chamberlain