Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’ - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY FIT

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

In October 2019, former Army Ranger Brandon Tucker was standing beneath a pullup bar. His hands were on fire, his muscles were failing — despite the two pairs of gloves plus pieces of leather cowhide, his hands were severely blistered.

“Three pullups every 30 seconds,” he told himself. He didn’t know about anything else, but he thought he could do that — and so he did. Over and over and over again.

By the end of the 24-hour period, Tucker had completed 7,715 pullups, smashing the previous record by more than 100.

Setting a world record is strenuous enough, but in order to officially hold a Guinness World Record, one has to go through a multitude of processes to prove the record has been broken. That means log sheets, witnesses, and cameras, and the entire procedure then goes through verifications until there is no doubt about the veracity of the record holder. Thankfully, Tucker had a team to support him in this endeavor, spearheaded by Mary Kubik, Gold Star sister of Sgt. Ronald Kubik, an Army Ranger who was killed in action in 2010. Tucker told Coffee or Die Magazine that Kubik really owned the documentation side of things and that her diligence was absolutely essential in the whole process.

Brandon Tucker and Mary Kubik hold the official Guinness World Records certification. Photo by Mary Kubik, courtesy of Brandon Tucker.

For Tucker, this verification process was lengthy — the pandemic hit soon after all of his evidence was submitted. And yet, after all of this time, Tucker has finally been officially recognized by Guinness World Records as holding the record for “The Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours (Male).”

“There’s a lot to be learned when you are willing to push yourself past your comfort zone,” Tucker recently told Coffee or Die. “When you commit to something so full-heartedly, then you give yourself no other option than to figure it out, learn it, and be successful at it before calling it quits. I feel like we’re too quick to sell ourselves short and back out on things. There’s eventually going to be a wall that you’re going to hit, you’re going to have to get out of your comfort zone.”

With almost every point Tucker made on pushing the body, he made sure to reiterate the importance of realizing that this philosophy can apply to all facets of life: “You gotta want it. There’s no easy road to being successful at anything that you do.”

“We have SO much potential. Not just fitness, not just pullups. In all areas of life,” Brandon Tucker said in an interview with Coffee or Die. Photo by Matt McGuire, courtesy of Brandon Tucker.

Tucker is currently the head coach at Uncommon Athlete, a gym in Columbus, Georgia. Now that the final ribbon has been tied to this world record, we asked him about the road forward. “I’ve got a lot of personal goals — I’m passionate about training and coaching, continuing to be a student in fitness and human anatomy and the human potential,” he said. “I want to keep doing that, learning, and passing that down to my clients at the gym.”

He also has his sights set on yet another world record.

Tucker is not precious about keeping the record to himself. In fact, it’s quite the opposite — the former record holders encouraged him, and he seeks to do the same for the next contender. “I want someone to break [my record], because I know what goes into it,” Tucker said. “I know that that person is going to learn something about themselves that they would not have learned otherwise. We have so much potential. Not just fitness, not just pullups. In all areas of life.”

It’s been a long road for Tucker, since he first picked up David Goggins’ Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds and decided he’d give the pullup world record a shot. After all this time, his perseverance, ability to surround himself with the right people, and sheer hard work has paid off.

Tucker attempted and secured this record in order to raise funds for: Rescue 22, Army Ranger Lead the Way Fund, Darby’s Warrior Support, Warrior Outreach Inc., Achilles International – Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans, and Higher Ground USA.

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

Olympian Nick Symmonds’ Army Fitness Test Challenge: What you need to know

Two-time Olympian runner Nick Symmonds, now the CEO of his own company, Run Gum, and the host of a popular YouTube channel, recently took on a new challenge: The Army Physical Fitness Test.

In a video posted Aug. 1, Symmonds attempted the test without any special training or practice, and bagged a respectable score, albeit with some not-quite-authorized modifications. Here’s what you need to know about Symmonds’ APFT challenge — and how you can take your own test to see how you would compare.


The Scores

The Army Physical Fitness Test currently involves three elements: maximum push-ups in two minutes, maximum sit-ups in two minutes, and a two-mile run for time.

Let’s start with the run. It’s been three years since Symmonds officially retired as a professional athlete, but he’s still in great shape and impressively fast. He completed two miles on the track in 11 minutes, 54 seconds — just under his personal goal of 12 minutes. Symmonds is 36, so he could have bagged a perfect score with a run time of 13 minutes, 18 seconds, or 6 minutes, 39 seconds per mile. No problem.

One the push-ups, Symmonds unfortunately would have been disqualified partway through (more on that below). But if all his reps had counted, he would have gotten 55 in two minutes. That’s good for a score of 79 out of 100. He would have had to get 75 push-ups to max out the APFT with a perfect 100 score.

For the sit-ups, the middle event on the APFT, Symmonds barely beat his push-up reps count, with 56 sit-ups. Here too, he would have been disqualified mid-event if the test had been administered by the Army. But if his full score counted, he would have gotten a 76 out of 100. To max out in his age ground, he would have needed 76 reps.

Bending the Rules

Here’s the thing: It’s not enough to do the reps on push-ups and sit-ups; you have to do them exactly as prescribed by the Army, and you can’t take unauthorized breaks.

On push-ups, Symmonds repeatedly sat up on his knees to shake out his arms, which would have meant instant disqualification on the real APFT. According to the official Army Physical Fitness Test administration rules, the only rest permitted mid-test is an “altered front leaning rest position,” meaning that soldiers may flex their back up or sag in the middle.

According to 550cord.com, “if you rest on the ground or raise either hand or foot from the ground, your performance will be terminated.”

Otherwise, Symmonds’ push-up form was strong. The Army regulations require the upper arms to be at least parallel to the ground on each repetition; Symmonds went deep enough to touch the ground on each rep.

The sit-ups also would have resulted in disqualification, according to Army rules. For proper sit-up position, a soldier must interlock fingers behind his or her head and come up to a vertical position where “the base of your neck is above the base of your spine.” The feet must be held by another soldier. Reps don’t count “if you fail to reach the vertical position, fail to keep your fingers interlocked behind your head, arch or bow your back and raise your buttocks off the ground to raise your upper body, or let your knees exceed a 90-degree angle.”

In addition, there’s only one authorized rest position: vertical. A soldier cannot rest in the “down” position.

Symmonds completed his reps with his arms crossed over his chest (although occasionally they flailed), used a soccer goal to secure his feet and rested repeatedly in the down position. The test was still tough and no doubt a good workout, but it would have landed Symmonds in trouble with Army supervisors for multiple rules infractions.

New Test Coming

Symmonds says he plans to retake the test as some point in the future and try again for a perfect score. But by the time he gets around to that, soldiers may be taking a different test with new rules and events. The Army is in the process of introducing the five-event Army Combat Fitness Test, which will be the test of record beginning Oct. 1.

The ACFT is considered more difficult to ace than the current APFT, and requires more equipment, too. The events on the new test include a maximum deadlift; standing power throw; hand-release push-up; sprint, drag and carry; leg tuck; and two-mile run.

Also new on the ACFT: all scores are age- and gender-neutral, which means there’s just one score chart for all soldiers. There are different minimum requirements based on job category, however; soldiers with jobs that are highly physically demanding, such as infantry, have to achieve higher scores than those with less physical jobs.

Army PFT Score Charts

Ready to Join the Military?

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This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

This is the ‘stress hormone’ that’s making you gain weight

Testosterone, estrogen, and leptin are just a few of the hormones that our bodies naturally produce. These hormones allow us to grow muscle, regulate our reproductive systems, and boost our metabolisms so we can lose weight. However, the stress generated by deployment cycles and our hectic schedules causes the human body to also produce a complex stress hormone, called cortisol.

This vital hormone is created by the adrenal glands, which are located just above your kidneys.

Cortisol dictates how your body manages the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins that you intake during meals. It lowers the amount of inflammation in your body and is one of the contributing factors to the sympathetic nervous system’s “fight or flight” response.

Experiencing chronic stress makes for increased levels of this powerful hormone. Having too much cortisol results in mood swings, “brain fog,” interrupted sleep patterns, and increased visceral fat (fat stored within the abdominal cavity).

But don’t worry — getting rid of those extra layers on your tummy doesn’t have to be difficult.


Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’
The infamous pinch test.

If you think your body is having trouble regulating cortisol production, you can go to your doctor and request a saliva test that monitors stress and hormone levels. Even if you don’t have stress-induced love handles, this might be a test worth taking. After all, having too little cortisol can also have negative affects on the body. Low cortisol may result in lowered blood pressure, a loss of appetite, and general fatigue.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’
Home tests are available,u00a0but a doctor can better explain the all the details.

Maintaining a healthy cortisol level is as easy as working out a few times per week, improving your social life, and finding time to relax whenever possible. Our bodies weren’t designed to endure constant stress, but the occasionally worry sits with us just fine.

MIGHTY FIT

Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 1

Welcome to the fantasy football after-action report, where we’re going to break down the winners and losers of fantasy football each and every week, as well as provide you with some intel about your waiver wire (not to mention, show you the most badass hit of the week). So, without further ado—the first after-action report of the 2019-2020 NFL season.


With Melvin Gordon away, Austin Ekeler is having himself a game: 113 scrimmage yards and 2 TDspic.twitter.com/CDWVsxHijv

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Blue chip medal

Lamar Jackson, QB, Ravens: We buy the hype. Jackson led the Baltimore Ravens to a team record 59 points with 384 yards passing, five touchdowns, and a perfect 158.3 passer rating. Jackson did all of this without posting his typically absurd rushing numbers. Is he the 2019-2020 Mahomes? Time will tell, but, like Jackson joked in the post-game press conference, “Not bad for a running back.”

Austin Ekeler, RB, Chargers: Anybody who followed the NFL last year would be able to recognize how eerily similar this situation is to the James Conner/Le’veon Bell saga in Pittsburgh last year. Ekeler, playing the role of Conner, stepped into a vacant starting position, and absolutely shined. McCaffery put up an insane 42 fantasy points this week, but Ekeler came out of the woodwork to give his fantasy owners 39 points. Now that’s a blue-chip.

Sammy Watkins, WR, Chiefs: There’s no telling if Watkins productivity can last, but as of week 1, he is the #1 blue chip fantasy receiver. He posted nine catches for 198 yards and three touchdowns. Of course, this was all with Tyreek Hill out of the game, so let’s see how he fares battling for touches against Oakland’s banged-up secondary next week.

Harrison Butker, K, Chiefs: Let’s give the kicker some love, eh?! Butker was four for four on field goals, and a perfect four for four on PATs, giving him 17 fantasy points. That’s more than all of our Loss of Rank players combined.

STATEMENT REGARDING ANTONIO BROWN: https://heitnerlegal.com/wp-content/uploads/Statement-Regarding-Antonio-Brown.pdf …pic.twitter.com/0K9G8vJeG1

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Loss of rank

These players did not perform up to expectations. We know it’s only Week 1, we don’t wanna induce panic, but proceed with caution if you have any of these guys on your roster.

Joe Mixon, RB, Bengals: After posting a top 10 rushing season last year, Mixon turned in a lackluster performance (10 yards on a meager six carries) before getting injured and leaving in the 3rd quarter. Cincinnati has been quiet about the extent of Mixon’s injury which is concerning. If you drafted him high, it may be worth it to try and unload him while you can.

Corey Davis, WR, Titans: Davis was only targeted three times. Meanwhile, rookie AJ Brown stole the show with a 100-yard performance, and Delanie Walker looks like he has returned to prime form. The Titans are nothing special this year, there are better receivers out there.

Antonio Brown, WR, Pats (for now): Antonio Brown may be the only man to get frostbite in a California summer. Then he had the helmet debacle. He followed that with the infamous fight with GM Mike Mayock. Finally, he posted a private Gruden conversation on Instagram and forced his way out of Oakland. After signing with New England, Brown enjoyed 2-3 days without controversy, and is back in the headlines with some very serious rape and false imprisonment allegations that may see him miss a lot of time. Steer clear of him.

Deebo Samuel, WR, 49ers: This loss of rank is iffy. Deebo led WRs with 60 snaps in week 1, which would typically be used in an argument defending a player’s upside. However, here’s the thing—Deebo produced diddly squat even with his crazy high usage. He’s competing for touches alongside better weapons like Kittle or Pettis and, perhaps most importantly of all, Jimmy G looks like he spent more time with Brazzers stars in the offseason than he did throwing balls.


Lamar Jackson and Marquise Brown connect on the 83-YARD TOUCHDOWN! #BALvsMIA @lj_era8 @primetime_jet : CBS : NFL app // Yahoo Sports app Watch on mobile: http://on.nfl.com/1J8Rxm pic.twitter.com/APB2UDrGXf

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Promotion watch

Here are some of the top dudes on promotion watch for your waiver wire:

Marquise “Hollywood” Brown, WR, Ravens: Sure he’s a rookie. Sure he had a good game against a (really really) terrible Miami Dolphins team. Sure he only had 12 snaps. But he was targeted in half of the snaps he was on the field, and he took two of those six catches to the house on plays of 45 yards or more. He could be the boom or bust pickup you need.

Malcom Brown, RB, Rams: With Todd Gurley’s health in question, everyone seemed to rally around Darrell Henderson, the 3rd round pick out of Memphis, to be the handcuff to the former fantasy stalwart. However, Malcolm Brown carried the rock five times in the red zone, and out-snapped Henderson by a wide margin. Huge upside here.

Darren Waller, TE, Raiders: This guy could easily be a repeat of 2019 Jared Cook, a top five tight end. However, his ceiling is even higher than that. He racked up seven catches for 70 yards from a white-hot Derek Carr. Oakland even lined him outside at WR for a couple snaps and threw him a back-shoulder fade route. Waller is a receiver converted to tight end and is a must-add in all leagues.

Andy Dalton, QB, Bengals: As it stands right now, Andy Dalton is the NFL’s leading passer with 418 yards. He put up that stellar performance against a brutal Seahawks defense, and without his favorite target A.J. Green. He’s only rostered in 4.2% of ESPN leagues. If you need a reliable QB2, or even a mid to late level QB1, Dalton could be your answer.


Ingram attempts to spin inside but gets crushed by Quenton Nelson. The sort of hit that slows down a rush has a lasting impact #bodyblowpic.twitter.com/Jzm3jtxS4H

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Badass hit of the week medal

Finally, the “Badass Hit of the Week” medal goes to Colts guard Quenton Nelson. When you think “badass hit,” visions of safeties taking the heads off a receiver over the middle come to mind. Well, the fellas down in the trenches are knockin’ skulls every play—so when one stands out you know it’s good. And plus, linemen need love, too.

MIGHTY FIT

Do your knees hurt when you squat?

If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it at least 10 times the back squat is the one exercise you should be doing to get stronger, bigger, faster, live longer, and look sexier. It’s that simple.

But sometimes our damn knees don’t seem to agree. Luckily there’s a lot you can do to make your knees a happy member of your lower body family.

First, let’s go over how to make some on the spot corrections and then talk about what you can do to make your knees strong and resilient.


Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You’ve got lazy glutes and your knees are paying the price.

The valgus knee collapse, yes, you read that correctly. It’s that brutal-looking event that happens when your glute medius doesn’t know how to pull its weight.

If your knees are caving in when you squat, fix it by focusing on twisting your knees out and engaging the upper outside corner of your glutes AKA your glute medius. For some of you that simple correction will be enough to relieve your knees and clear up any pain.

Here’s another way to wake your glutes up as well.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Give your glutes a reminder.

In between sets of squatting perform 12-15 reps of the glute bridge. Really focus on squeezing your glutes at the top of the movement and keeping your knees pointed out while bridging. This will cue your glutes to stay on when you get back to your sets of squatting.

Don’t forget about the hip thrust either!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Give your hips a reminder.

It’s not always the glutes’ fault; sometimes the hip flexors are just as guilty. The majority of us spend all day sitting down with our psoas muscles and the rest of the hips flexors gang shortened and disengaged. It’s not totally their fault for not taking part in the squat.

By engaging your hip flexors, you’ll find it easier to sit back and down rather than crumbling forward into your knees like you may be doing currently.

Give your hip flexors some resistance between sets with your hands and force them to actively close your hip angle.

If that simple cue doesn’t work for you, use a resistance band to give you some errr…. resistance. Hang it up high and hold onto it with both hands. Then actively pull yourself down into the squat position by engaging your hip flexors.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Maybe, you’ve got bad form.

Patterning issues aren’t uncommon in the squat. It’s a complicated exercise. That’s why if you haven’t yet committed it to memory you need to reread the 5 Steps to Back Squat Perfection.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You aren’t sitting back.

Squat TO A box. Don’t box squat.

The box isn’t there to make your life easier. It’s there to help you make the squat as efficient and gainful as possible. Put that box behind you and stick your ass out and back to the box. Just touch it with your butt and stand back up. Don’t linger down there relaxing.

Here are some other squat variants to spice up your training.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Your depth is not deep enough.

The funny thing about squat depth is it helps you actually engage the muscles you want to. If you’re only doing half or quarter squats your hamstrings are getting left out.

When your quads are completely dominating the squat, they are also putting a lot of anterior stress on the knee. The hamstrings job is to be engaged and supply an equally opposing force on the knee.

If you aren’t getting your hamstrings involved your quad is crushing your knee. It’s as simple as that.

Make sure you’re deadlifting enough to keep those hammies strong as well!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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You need more ankle mobility.

Simply stand with your heels on a 1-inch board. Boom! More ankle mobility and less forward knee travel in the squat.

Now that’s a life hack! Silicon Valley biohackers ain’t got nothin’ on my Back Squat Hacks!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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The stronger and happier knees prescription.

Foam roll your thighs. Hit them from every angle after you finish squatting or on your off days.

Take 3-5 minutes per leg. Any more than that is just masturbation.

If you’re interested, here’s a deep dive on recovery.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Lying Side Clams

Get your Fit-Chick-Gym-Shark pants on and practice opening and closing your legs. Seriously, don’t wear short shorts when doing these.

Do 2-3 sets of 10-12 reps at the end of your leg workout.

Add them to the end of The Mighty Fit Plan as well!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Hip Thrust

Thrust it out!

These will wake the sleeping giant that is your ass. After 4 weeks of hip thrusts you’ll find yourself walking different in a more efficient and stable kind of way.

Hip thrust once a week, program in the same reps and sets scheme as your deadlift and back squat. Consider them your 3rd major lower body movement.

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Hit your Core

Hit your obliques and rectus abdominis. Chops and ab wheel roll-out will do the trick here. Throw them at the end of any workout and go for 2-3 sets of 8-12 reps. They will make your core so stable that your knees won’t ever feel the secondary effects of a weak spine ever again.

Unlike these, the above core exercises actually do something!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Consider your Squat frequency

Only squat once per week. Unless you love squatting or are competing you don’t need to do it more than 1 time a week. You have 3 major lower body movements; the squat, the deadlift, and the hip thrust. There’s no need to squat, especially if your knees bother you.

Even if the Back squat is King!

Do your knees hurt when squatting?

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Do your knees hurt when squatting?

That’s it yo! If you haven’t yet watched the video that I made to go along with this article, you’re missing out. That’s where the nitty-gritty details are.

If you diligently apply these fixes to your back squat, you will very quickly find that your knees are no longer bothersome.

By combining these fixes with the programming of the Mighty Fit Plan, you’ll be unstoppable.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’
MIGHTY FIT

Team RWB invites you to accept the 1776 Challenge!

Team Red, White & Blue’s 1776 Challenge is an epic physical series of goals that brings Veterans, supporters, and Team RWB partners together to focus on service, personal growth, and the joy that comes from doing something hard with others.

Take the challenge each day from June 17, 2020, to July 4, 2020. Together, we will perform up to 100 daily repetitions of various exercises such as lunges, squats, push ups, or crunches. Alternative exercises will be provided to ensure participants at all ability levels are able to complete the challenge.

New exercises will be shared through the Team RWB App every day, featuring demonstrative videos hosted by Team RWB’s corporate and nonprofit partners. Demonstrations will include modifications for various fitness levels and mobility. Additional adaptive exercises will be demonstrated by retired Army Sergeant First Class and and Paralympian Centra “Ce-Ce” Mazyck, a recipient of TrueCar’s DrivenToDrive program.


Up for the challenge?

If you’re up for the challenge, join Team RWB as we tackle 1776 reps and break down barriers for Veterans. Click here to sign up for reminders and daily inspiration straight to your inbox. Participants to complete every exercise and check-in through the app will receive a free 1776 Challenge patch.

You must be a member of Team RWB to check in and participate. Membership is free and Veterans get a free Nike shirt!

Learn More!

This article originally appeared on VAntage Point. Follow @DeptVetAffairs on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

This video of KC Chiefs’ star Patrick Mahomes thanking a veteran will make you cry

We already love Kansas City Chiefs’ star quarterback Patrick Mahomes for his contagious spirit, incredible arm and infectious attitude. Plus, the fact that he builds homes for veterans in his spare time doesn’t hurt. And now, this video of him writing a letter of support and gratitude to die hard fan and Army veteran Scott Buis will bring a tear to your eye.


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The letter was part of an NFL Veteran’s Day campaign in which NFL stars wrote letters to their superfans who have served.

Mahomes’ gratitude for Buis and the military is sincere: “Without your service,” he said, “there would be no football, no NFL, and of course no game days.”

Buis’ emotional response is so touching: “Wow. It’s things like this that helps me, veterans, people believe in the American dream.

Be sure to tune into We Are The Mighty on Facebook this weekend as we interview players and veterans in the USAA Salute to Service Lounge as part of the NFL Experience.

MIGHTY FIT

10 top fitness YouTubers who are veterans

The arrival of spring signifies a midpoint for many in summer preparation. For New Year Resolutioners, the desire to be in the best shape of their life fades by Valentine’s Day. There are others, however, who have or are near to achieving the body they dreamed of when they set foot in the gym on January 1. The beginning of spring tells them that it’s almost time to break the glass on their new digs.


To those who have fallen off, no worries. There’s still time to make serious strides toward achieving that summer body if you take action sooner rather than later. The following veterans have made it their business to offer information and help the masses as best they can — and the fitness community has responded! These veterans are the top of the top and any of them can get you speeding down the road toward your fitness goals.

Related: How US military veterans are set to dominate the Paralympics

1. Greg Plitt

Greg Plitt was one of the first fitness personalities to break through and cross over into mainstream acceptance. Plitt was one of the most booked and photographed fitness models of his day, even landing a role — well his body did, anyway — in Zack Synder’s adaptation of the graphic novel Watchmen.

He was a U.S. Army Ranger prior to his career in fitness and his videos still inspire. He passed, tragically, at the age of 37.

You can follow Greg’s still active accounts:

Greg’s Instagram

Greg’s YouTube


Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

2. CT Fletcher

CT Fletcher is a veteran of the U.S. Army and is considered by some as the godfather of the YouTube fitness community. He ushered in a new, brash, high-tempo style of content in the early 2010’s and has gathered a legion of loyal fans since.

Before social media fame and after serving, he was a multi-year champion powerlifter. He holds the strict curl record to this day.

Check out CT’s regularly updated social media:

CT’s Instagram

CT’s YouTube

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

3. Dave Castro

Castro is a former Navy SEAL who has been instrumental to the widespread popularity of CrossFit. He conjured up and hosted the initial CrossFit games at his family’s ranch and hasn’t let up since, spearheading the growth and marketing that we see everywhere today.

Check out Dave’s social media for the latest and greatest:

Dave’s Instagram

Dave’s YouTube

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

4. Josh Bridges

A few things about Josh Bridges: He is a former Navy SEAL. Prior to that, he was a collegiate wrestler. Somewhere along the way, he became a CrossFit legend and one of the top-ranked competitors despite being just 5’5″.

Check out Josh’s IG:

Josh’s Instagram

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

5. Max Philisaire

An Army Veteran who has made his life about fitness, Max “The Body” Philisaire has been an active member of the fitness community for nearly two decades. He is an current and certified personal trainer training everyone from your average joe to some serious A List talent.

Check out Max’s social media:

Max’s IG

Max’s YouTube

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

6. Rudy Reyes

A former Force Recon Marine, Reyes has found success as a Kung Fu instructor and actor, portraying himself in the HBO series Generation Kill.

A personal friend of We Are The Mighty, we look forward to seeing him demolish the pull-up bar again.

Check out Rudy’s Insta and see what he has going on:

Rudy’s Instagram

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’
Rudy Reyes thinking of ways to make himself — and you — more badass. (Budomate)

7. Michael Eckert

Michael Eckert was a U.S. Marine up until 2017 when he separated to pursue his fitness-related dreams. He is the world record holder for most strict-form pull-ups completed in one minute.

Check out Michael’s Instagram

Don’t forget to hit his website too.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

8. Diamond Ott

An active duty U.S. Army 1st Sgt., Diamond Ott is one the world’s strongest and fittest men. He first garnered attention after some videos of his gym feats made their way to the internet. Ott has since been on multiple magazine covers and his audience and influence continue to grow.

See the shirt’s IG below:

Diamond’s Instagram

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

9. Charissa Littlejohn

Charissa is an Air Force veteran that separated from service a few years back and has had been on a meteoric rise ever since. Outside of fitness, she is also a business owner and a model.

Check out Charissa’s Instagram and website below:

Charissa’s IG

Charissa’s Business

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

10. Colin Wayne

U.S. Army veteran and self-made millionaire Colin Wayne has been on multiple international magazine covers, amassed a few million followers and fans across various social media outlets, and built a steel upstart into a multi-million dollar company.

He’ll be just 29 this year.

Peep Colin’s IG and business page below:

Colin’s Instagram

Colin’s Steel Company

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Also Read: This athlete left the NFL to serve. Now he wants back in

*Bonus* One to watch: Jaron Mosley

Jaron Mosley is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, having spent an enlistment as a Security Force member. His videos offer insight and “game,” as he calls it, to get you all the way right in time for summer.

Check out Jaron’s IG and YouTube in time for Spring and Summer:

Jaron’s Instagram

Jaron’s YouTube

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

MIGHTY FIT

Watch: How to pass the Naval Special Warfare Physical Screening Test

Think your physical fitness is top-notch enough to become a SEAL? If you’re even loosely considering taking the Special Warfare Physical Screening Test there are definitely some things you need to know. Watch this video for the top tips and a blueprint on making your way through the hardest workout PT test for US Navy special forces. It’s not just physical fitness that’s required to crush this test – it’s mental toughness, too.

The PST is a hardcore workout with strict time limits that challenges your physical fitness. First, there’s a rigorous 500-yard swim in under 12.5 minutes. You get 10 minutes to rest before starting the next part of the workout where you race to achieve a max number of pushups in two minutes. Two minutes to breathe and then you try to max out on sit-ups. Another 2-minute break before maxing out on your pull-ups. Then, you have a ten-minute break before the brutal 1.5-mile run – that has to be completed in under 12.5 minutes. 

Oh, and if you really want to be considered, you exceed these standards – not just meet them. 

So while the Army might be complaining about the new standards for the ACFT, the SEALS have been cross-training for so long that they make it look easy. 

How to cut down on the minutes it takes you to complete the test

To really do well on this, you need to identify your weaknesses and then crush them.

  • Train like you’re testing. Keep the same time limits for your own breaks. That way when you get to test day, it won’t seem completely impossible to regain your breath. 
  • Focus on progression. Get repetitions in throughout the day. For the exercises like sit-ups, break them up into sets. For example, if your max is 50 sit-ups in 2 minutes until failure. Break that up into 25 sit-ups several times a day to work on max progressive overload.  
  • Pacing is key for each test. Swimming 500 years in 12.5 minutes will wipe you out unless you pace your swim, using underwater recovery techniques including breaststroke, sidestroke and combat swim stroke to utilize your swim as a warm-up that gets you ready for the next part of the workout. 

The Navy Seal training pipeline includes six-month basic training on underwater demolition and airborne operations as well as three months of tactical training. Maintaining a top level of physical fitness and regular workouts is a necessity for a SEAL.

MIGHTY FIT

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Well, it’s about that time again. The Army has plans for another physical fitness test with events other than push-ups, sit-ups, and a two mile run. This time around, the review process seems to have lasted longer than a few weeks so it might possibly, maybe, actually happen.


The new Army Combat Readiness Test will more than likely become a thing. There will now be six events instead of the previous three. The idea behind it is that it reflects the real-world obstacles of combat.

All muscle groups will be worked out, as opposed to just the upper-body, core and cardio endurance. Equipment will now be used. Possibly gender neutral but MOS-specific scoring. And some officer who was REALLY into Crossfit is happy.

Event 1: Leg Tuck

Testing your shoulders, core, and leg endurance, the objective is to raise your knees to your elbow as many times as you can until you reach muscle failure. It simulates climbing tasks.

This event isn’t too demanding or challenging in theory. The concern is trying to keep your endurance up to the point where you can complete as many as you can without reaching complete muscle failure — you don’t want to shoot yourself in the foot for the remaining five events.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Event 2: Power Throw

Testing your upper and lower body power, the objective is to toss a 10lb medicine ball behind you as far as you can twice (with both attempts added to the closest centimeter). It simulates lifting, progressive levels of force, and uh, tossing?

Holy crap, dude. If you can’t get someone to help watch where you’re blindly throwing a 10lb ball, just do squats with the ball instead. Shy of the combat application of the ACRT, the second goal is to minimize injuries. Don’t make this event more dangerous than doing a sit-up.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Event 3: Trap Bar Dead-lift

Testing your lower and back strength, the objective is to dead-lift the trap bar three times with a weight you determine. It simulates a soldier’s ability to lift and carry someone on a litter or move equipment.

Remember that “minimize injury” thing from the last event? Learn how to do a proper dead-lift. No way around that. This is supposed to be less dangerous than a push-up. Even if your form is good, it would be beneficial to know your maximum dead-lift weight you can actually perform — three times — so you aren’t wasting your time (and effort) doing two, then have to bump down in weights and try three again. Work smarter not harder.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Event 4: T Push-up

Testing your upper body endurance, the objective is to successfully complete as many T Push-ups as you can before you reach muscle failure. It simulates pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact.

It’s just like a push-up. But when you’re down, touch your chest on the ground and spread your arms. Do this until you get tired.

No health risk, but I mean, it would be funny watching someone try to skip steps to be fast and face-plant into the ground. Please take photos to laugh at the poor SOB.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Event 5: Shuttle Sprint-Drag-Carry

Testing your muscular strength, anarobic capacity, and ability to exert effort at high intensity for brief moments, the object is to lay prone. On the command “Go!” sprint 25m down and 25 back. Pick up the straps to a 100lb sled and drag it 25m down and back. Sprint the 25m down and back again. Grab two 40lb kettlebells and run the 25m down and back. Then finish the event sprinting again.

So it’s sprint, sled, sprint, kettlebells, and sprint. No real way to prepare sprinting with 40lb kettlebells without just sprinting with 40lbs kettlebells.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Event 6: 2-Mile Run

Testing your cardio-respiratory endurance, the objective is to run two miles — and just like before, you’re still graded on how fast you finish it. It simulates a soldier’s ability to execute long distance ruck marches and to run two miles?

And the new fitness test still involves the run. Only thing different is the grading. So yeah. Get some.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

MIGHTY FIT

Coast Guard expert gives tips for selecting a great gym

The Department of Health and Human Services recently released the second edition of their physical activity guidelines for Americans. These guidelines recommend 150 minutes per week of aerobic activity and 30 minutes of strength training, and confirms the overall importance that exercise has on our lives. These guidelines also align with Coast Guard policy for active duty members.

Although there are many ways to accomplish this goal, this time of year many people look to local gyms as an option to help them get physical activity. Before you invest in a gym membership, consider the following:


1. Convenience. Make sure the gym is convenient to your location. Do you pass the gym on the way home from work? You also may want to work out early in the morning or after work hours, so it is important to visit the gym during these times. What is the atmosphere during those times? If you are interested in group classes, do they have them available during the time slots you’re available?

2. Equipment and amenities. When you preview a prospective gym, take a good look at the condition of the equipment and cleanliness of the facility. Do they offer towels or a sauna? Check out the showers and restrooms for cleanliness. Take note of what equipment is available to help you attain your fitness goals and also how long people are waiting to use the equipment. Nothing wilts enthusiasm for a good workout than having to wait to use a machine.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Port Security 3rd Class Francesca Smith, a policewoman at Coast Guard Activities NY who recently won the New York City Golden gloves Championship, shadow boxes inside Gleason’s Boxing Gym, brokklyn, NY., June 20, 2003.

(USCG photo by PA1 Tom Sperduto)

3. Fees. The costs involved to join a gym can vary greatly. Some facilities offer a great workout for a low monthly fee with no contract while others want you to commit for a year. Take time to make a good comparison of what is available in your area and make sure it’s within your budget. Do they offer a group discount, family, or military discount? Do they have reciprocal membership to other gyms? Make sure they have a military clause if you suddenly get orders out of the area. Ask if childcare is available onsite and how much it is.

4. Qualified instructors and personal trainers. If you would like the advice of a personal trainer to reach your fitness goals, you need to see if they are available and what the costs are to have them give you instruction on a good routine. Having a qualified instructor to evaluate your form may save you months of rehab. It’s also advisable to see how well-equipped the facility is if an emergency arises. Are the staff trained in CPR or do they have people who are certified to use any emergency life saving devices or techniques?

A formal gym is not necessary to achieve the updated physical activity guidelines, but in certain situations, it can help. Before investing in a gym membership, take a look at all the aspects of this commitment and make sure it is the correct fit for you and your family.

This article originally appeared on Coast Guard All Hands. Follow @USCG on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

Engineers develop new strength-based physical readiness program

Company D, 31st Engineer Battalion, at Fort Leonard Wood is one of a small handful of training units piloting a new concept in physical readiness mirrored on characteristics of the new Army Combat Fitness Test.

The Strength Training Program was developed by the Maneuver Center of Excellence Directorate of Training and Doctrine’s Training and Education Development Division at Fort Benning, Georgia, who looked at an assessment of Soldier physical fitness in relation to the Army Physical Fitness Test.

“The APFT does not adequately assess the domains of muscular strength, explosive power, speed, agility, flexibility and balance,” said Capt. Jeffry O’Loughlin, Company D commander. “This new physical training program was developed to better prepare a Soldier’s readiness for the demands of the modern battlefield by focusing on all aspects of combat fitness — similar to the aim of the ACFT.”


According to Maj. Donny Bigham, head strength coach for the Tactical Athlete Performance Center at Fort Benning and developer of the program, the pilot’s purpose is two-fold.

“First, it will increase lethality and survivability through physical dominance,” he said. “Second, it will increase readiness by reducing musculoskeletal injuries in order to improve a unit’s mission capability in the operational force.”

According to O’Loughlin, the program has a balanced design to attain the new physical readiness training goals to develop strength, endurance and mobility. The current fitness model has 47 aerobic sessions, 18 anaerobic sessions, zero strength sessions and zero mobility sessions.

“The Strength Training Program Delta Company implemented consists of 16 aerobic sessions, 16 anaerobic sessions, 19 strength sessions and 19 mobility sessions,” he said. “It deliberately integrates more strength and mobility workouts into the schedule to increase physical readiness in all aspects. The current model only builds muscular endurance — we instead instruct proper form while lifting heavier weight. Correspondingly, trainees are better prepared to complete warrior tasks and battle drills, such as casualty extraction.”

The program allows for strength and endurance development into the performance of basic military skills such as marching, speed running, jumping, vaulting, climbing, crawling and combatives.

Former Army Ranger Officially Recognized by Guinness World Records for ‘Most Pull Ups in 24 Hours’

Staff Sgt. Daniel Yeates, a drill sergeant with Company D, 31st Engineer Battalion, demonstrates to trainees the proper technique for a kettlebell bent-over row. The company is piloting a new concept in physical readiness called the Strength Training Program, which is designed to reduce injuries throughout Basic Combat Training.

(U.S. Army photo by Capt. Jeffry OLoughlin)

“The ACFT will utilize six assessments at a minimum to capture all of the essential attributes of a Soldier to ensure nothing is overlooked in training the Soldier as a tactical athlete,” Bigham said. “The combination of fitness components, along with the performance fitness skills provide a better picture of the true functional competence required to physically dominate any mission related tasks. This program ensures exercise order, variation and the specificity necessary to be successful on today’s battlefield.”

As part of the new program, an assessment divides trainees into three ability groups — advanced, trained and untrained — and the results seen so far in Company D over 18 months show an overall increase in APFT scores and decrease in injuries. From 2018 through the most recent training cycle to be completed, Company D went from 26 injuries to 11, eight, seven, and finally just four. At the same time, O’Loughlin saw average physical training scores jump from 212 to 227 (237 to 248 in advanced individual training).

O’Loughlin said he feels much of that success can be equated to this new way of thinking in Army physical training.

“This program is not just about lifting kettlebells,” he said. “We also consider active recovery with mobility sessions with rollers and balls to break up adhesions and scar tissue to speed up the healing process and help prevent over-training.”

According to Bigham, seven training units have completed the program so far, and currently all trainees assigned to the 198th Infantry Brigade at Fort Benning are piloting the program as of Oct. 1 of this year. Across the board, he’s seeing injury numbers halve, while APFT failure rates are about a third of what they were previously

“Physical training should be the number one aspect when it comes to improving lethality on the battlefield,” he said. “It must be mandatory to ensure Soldiers have the tools in their kit bag to win the last 100 yards. This strength-based program will be a force multiplier that will increase lethality, combat effectiveness, moral and ethical decision making, overall readiness and survivability on any battlefield that enemies pose a threat to our nation.”

This article originally appeared on Army.mil. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

This is the 7-minute exercise routine you should do every day

As part of the crazy world of the military, our schedules are freakin’ hectic. We have a boatload of responsibilities to complete daily and, after everything’s done, we have to try and carve out time to get a solid workout in.

That sh*t isn’t easy.

So, to complement troops’ sh*tty schedules, some masterminds developed a workout technique called high-intensity interval training that will quickly get your heart pumping. The concept is simple, but effective: you perform short bursts of strenuous activity and sneak in even shorter periods of rest between.

Using this technique, trainers have come up with a 7-minute exercise routine that can be done virtually anywhere using just your body weight, a wall, and a standing platform. You’ll do 12 different exercises for 30 seconds each and reward yourself with 10 seconds of rest between each set. Although you don’t have to do the following motions in any particular order, we recommend that you start from the top with side straddle hops to get your blood pumping.

Let’s go over the routine:


Side straddle hops for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Wall sit for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Push ups for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Sit ups for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Platform (or chair) step-ups for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Side planks for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Air squats for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Triceps dips for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Planking for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Running in place for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Lunges for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

Push up with side plank for 30 seconds, rest for 10 seconds.

After you complete the first round, if you’ve got more time and energy in the tank, then do another.

If you can’t find time to do at least one round of this training, you might want to rethink your lifestyle…