Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY GAMING

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

So Santa is gonna hook you up with a new console? In that case, you need a new gaming headset. Think of it as a gift for yourself. A gift you deserve. And one you can’t pass up, because you truly can’t beat these Black Friday prices on everything from Xbox headsets to PS4 headphones.


Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

One of the most beloved gaming headsets you can buy if you love your PS4, and it’s down from 9.99.

SteelSeries Arctis Pro + GameDAC Wired Gaming Headset

Buy now 5.99

When you’re ready to up your gaming game, get this stellar headset. You get audiophile-grade sound quality, and a bidirectional microphone that gives you studio quality voice clarity, plus background noise cancelation. It works with PS4 and PC.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

This wireless gaming headset has killer 7.1-channel surround sound and is normally 9.99.

HyperX Cloud Revolver S – Gaming Headset

Buy now 8.00

The fully immersive sound aside, we dig this gaming headset because it’s also mad-comfortable and made with memory foam. It’s not wireless, but its eight foot long cable makes it very user-friendly. It can connect to PS4 Pro, PC and any other devices that support USB sound. You can get a jack to plug it into your phone or the Xbox.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

This wireless gaming headset normally runs you 9.99.

HyperX Cloud Flight – Wireless Gaming Headset

Buy now 8.99

You get up to 30 hours of battery life with this wireless gaming headset. It’s the go-to for PS4 and PS Pro gamers. It has 90 degree rotating ear cups, and a detachable noise cancellation microphone.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

This versatile wireless gaming headset with surround sound is regularly 9.99 and perfect if you adore your Xbox One.

LucidSound LS35X Wireless Surround Sound Gaming Headset

Buy now 9.99

This gaming headset instantly syncs with Xbox wireless technology and connects directly to your Xbox One console and configures on its own. It’s also compatible with Sony PS4, PlayStation 4, PC, Mac, Windows, iOS Android, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, iPad, 3DS, and PS Vita. Yeah. It has a dual microphone with advance noise cancellation to reduce noise.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

Normally 9.99, this gaming headset has best-in-class speaker drivers with high-density neodymium magnets.

SteelSeries Arctis Pro High Fidelity Gaming Headset

Buy now 3.93

If you’re hungry for the best in sound quality and comfort, take a look at this gaming headset. It has a self-adjusting ski goggle headband that contours to your head. It works with PC, PS4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, Mac, VR, and mobile.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

How the Navy helped make ‘Hunter Killer’

The submarine thriller “Hunter Killer” (out now on 4K UHD, Blu-ray, DVD and Digital) had a long and complicated journey from book to screen.

Based on the novel “Firing Point” by Navy veteran George Wallace and Don Keith, the Gerard Butler movie was days away from beginning production when Relativity Studios shut down.

After a delay, new director Donovan Marsh joined the project. They regrouped with Summit and made a movie with extensive support from the Pentagon, which envisioned the film as a “Top Gun” for submariners.


Gerard plays Capt. Joe Glass, a maverick who is given command of a sub even though he didn’t go to Annapolis. The Russian president gets kidnapped, and Glass must break the rules to save the world.

Hunter Killer (2018 Movie) Final Trailer – Gerard Butler, Gary Oldman, Common

www.youtube.com

“Hunter Killer” features an impressive cast that includes Gary Oldman, Common, Linda Cardellini, Toby Stephens and Michael Nyqvist from the original Swedish Lisbeth Salander/Millennium movies

Marsh made the well-regarded South African crime thriller “Avenged,” but “Hunter Killer” is his first big Hollywood movie. He told us about working with the Pentagon, how much of the movie was shot on real submarines, and how you make an action movie on a submarine.

You’re from South Africa, a country not known for its Navy. Did you have an interest in military movies or history growing up?

South Africa has two diesel submarines, but only crew for one. One is in dry dock, and they can’t afford to take the other one out. So if I couldn’t love my own Navy, I could love the navies of the movies. Enter “Das Boot,” “Crimson Tide” and “Hunt for Red October.” Three of my favorite films of all time.

Gerard Butler worked on this movie as a producer for many years before it got made. Tell us how you came on board as the director.

The film had a different director and was months from shooting with Relativity. When Relativity came apart, the film was looking for a new home and a new director. I pitched and won the job. When I came on board, Gerard, Oldman and Common were already part of the project.

The Pentagon has been unusually supportive of your “Hunter Killer,” even hosting a press conference with Gerard Butler. What was it like working with the Navy on the movie? Did they have input into the filming since they gave your production so much access to Navy subs?

The Navy was incredible. They welcomed us in Pearl Harbor, sent myself and Gerry out on a real nuclear sub for three days, and showed us behind the scenes in the way that few civilians ever get to see. They gave us access to Navy experts, captains and admirals every step of the way, many of whom were present during filming and who made sure we stayed as realistic as was dramatically possible (and without giving away anything classified!).

The submariners want to know. How much filming did you get to do on real submarines and how much did you recreate on sets?

I had one day in the USS Texas with the real crew They were amazing; I challenge you to pick them out from the actors. I had one afternoon with the Texas at sea for helicopter shots. We nearly crashed the chopper (metal in the transmission!), had to return the next morning to shoot the emergency blow. I had one take and only knew the point they were going to surface within 100 hundred meters. They surfaced in the edge of shot and I quickly reframed!

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

Michael Nyqvist and Gerard Butler star in “Hunter Killer.”

(Summit Pictures)

What roles did practical and CGI effects play in your production?

We had 900+ visual effects shots that took over a year to complete. It was the biggest challenge of my life, and I still feel they could have been much better. To simulate reality is very difficult, and only the most skilled VFX teams with months and months of time can do it.

A submarine commander once told me, “The Army plays rugby. I play chess.” How do you approach a battle movie when you’ve got to depend more on suspense than brute action?

I just flat out prefer suspense to brute action. It’s more interesting. It’s delicious. It’s dramatic. During brute action scenes, I always end up looking at my watch. I wanted HK to create as much tension and suspense as the audience could bear and then release that with action that was quick, sharp and believable.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

Gary Oldman, Linda Cardellini and Common in “Hunter Killer.”

(Summit Pictures)

Even though the movie portrays American and Russian presidents who are nothing like the real leaders, “Hunter Killer” portrays a contentious relationship between the two countries that didn’t exist even five years ago. Did rising tensions between the U.S. and Russia help you get this movie made?

Tensions between the U.S. and Russian escalated leading up to this film, significantly adding to its relevance. A Russian MiG buzzed a destroyer, and Russian sub activity in American waters and vice versa was on the rise. This played in wonderfully to the plot of the film, which starts with two subs getting into it under the ice.

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Navy ship trains to rescue astronauts at sea

San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) is underway to conduct Underway Recovery Test (URT) 7 in conjunction with NASA off the coast of Southern California.

URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware, and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth.


This will be the first time John P. Murtha will conduct a URT mission with NASA. Throughout the history of the program, a variety of San Antonio-class LPD ships have been utilized to train and prepare NASA and the Navy, utilizing a Boiler Plate Test Article (BTA). The BTA is a mock capsule, designed to roughly the same size, shape, and center of gravity as the Crew Module which will be used for Orion.

NASA and Navy teams have taken lessons learned from previous recovery tests to improve operations and ensure the ability to safely and successfully recover the Orion capsule when it returns to Earth following Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) in December 2019.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha arrives to its new homeport Naval Base San Diego.

(U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Lucas T. Hans)

EM-1 will be an uncrewed flight, whose successful completion hopes to pave the way for future crewed missions and enable future missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

During URT-7, John P. Murtha will conduct restricted maneuvering operations. Small boats carrying Navy and NASA divers will deploy alongside the BTA to rig tending lines, guiding the capsule to Anchorage as the ship safely operates on station.

Conducting both daytime and nighttime recovery operations, NASA crew members will work alongside the Navy to manage how the capsule is brought in, set down and safely stored.

NASA plans to conduct two more URT missions before EM-1 takes place.

John P. Murtha is homeported in San Diego and is part of Naval Surface Forces and U.S. 3rd Fleet.

Commander, U.S. Third Fleet leads naval forces in the Pacific and provides realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy. They coordinate with Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet to plan and execute missions based on their complementary strengths to promote ongoing peace, security, and stability.

This article originally appeared on DVIDS. Follow @DVIDSHub on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Top podcasts for the commuting veteran

The popularity of podcasts is soaring exponentially. It is a radio renaissance. With over 500,000 podcasts on just the Apple store alone, it’s obvious that with rising popularity comes oversaturation. But have no fear—We Are The Mighty is here—to help clear the mist and show you the best podcasts for anyone with a military background. Whether you’re a veteran with a long morning commute, an on-base active serviceman with duty that could use some spicing up, or simply a prospective enlistee, at least one of these podcasts will be just right for you.


Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

SOFREP Radio

This podcast flat out kicks ass. The host, Jack Murphy (Army Ranger/Green Beret) talk with experts across every aspect of military life. He’s straight, to the point, no bulls**t. The podcast focuses on ways of cultivating mental and physical toughness with respect to special operations. With over 400 episodes already out, there is plenty to dive in and catch up on. This is the premier military podcast.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

War College

War College explores weapons, tech, and various military stories related to the instruments of war that soldiers need to be familiar with. One week they’ll talk about Navy pilots experiencing UFOs, and the next they’ll break down the Air Forces’ new “Frozen Chicken Gun.” Highly informative.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Podcast has become a cultural phenomenon. The premise for one of the most popular podcasts of all-time is simple: Joe Rogan sits across from a guest and has an intelligent back and forth conversation for about 3 hours. His guests range massively in scope: Elon Musk, UFC fighters, fellow comedians, scientists, psychologists, authors, and more. Joe Rogan’s centrist sweep highly appeals to people in the military sphere, and the topics covered on here would be interesting to anybody. It’s not just an internet meme, it’s a great listen.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

American Military History Podcast

For all the military history buffs out there—look no further. This podcast goes deeper than the surface facts we usually associate with historical events. I found myself surprised to learn contextual facts about historical battles I thought I knew. The key aspect of this podcast that sets it apart from other military history podcasts is the context. It gives perspective and crafts interesting narratives out of that context.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

Mind of the Warrior

In this podcast, Dr. Mike Simpson (former Special Forces Operator and highly regarded expert on both combat trauma and combat sports medicine), delves into the psychology of what it takes to be a modern day “warrior.” He talks with top-ranking policemen, to combat veterans, to MMA experts, and many more—all in pursuit of talking about combat and the common threads that loom warriors to the same fabric.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

This Past Weekend with Theo Von

Every military service member needs some laughter in their life, too. Theo Von and his hilarious podcast “This Past Weekend” have just the right flavor for a military background listener. In case you don’t know, Theo Von is a rising comedic voice and one of the absolute funniest dudes in the country. His Louisiana drawl contrasts his bizarre shoehorning of the English language and, when combined with some downright brilliant joke writing, becomes a really easy recipe for some deep belly laughs on your commute. The only downside is you can’t see his glorious mullet through your headphones.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

War on the Rocks

Ryan Evans swills some drinks and talks policy, life, and security on this well-produced podcast. The issues span from diplomacy to economic to domestic. Ryan has a really contagious charisma which makes for a lot of vehement nodding in agreement while listening. A must listen for anyone interested in geopolitics.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

Bill Burr’s Monday Morning Podcast

And finally, we have the legendary Bill Burr, in one of the longest-running comedic podcasts out there. If you have served in the military, and you haven’t heard of Bill Burr, just listen to a single episode. All of your internal frustrations will be hilariously articulated right before your eyes as Bill Burr rants to himself (and a 1,000,000+ listeners) about issues small and large. His clear cut, no-nonsense approach is really sobering and refreshing. His east-coast Boston accent layers his precisely supported rants with an authentic edginess. Feels kinda like an audio shot of whisky on your way to work.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Israel pulled off the most brazen intel heist in modern history

Israel’s spy agency, Mossad, stole a huge trove of documents from Iran in early 2018, in one of its most brazen missions.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu revealed the mission in a speech accusing Iran of “brazenly lying” about its nuclear capabilities. Netanyahu unveiled a collection of documents, which he said were stolen directly from Tehran facilities in “a great intelligence achievement.”


Among the stolen intel were 110,000 documents, videos, and photographs that Netanyahu claimed showed Iran lied about its nuclear ambitions and deceived powers involved in the 2015 nuclear deal, known as the JCPOA.

Netanyahu said that stash was made up of 55,000 pages of documents and another 55,000 files stored on 183 CDs. He said the haul collectively weighed half a ton.

Netanyahu didn’t confirm how Mossad, known for its stealthy missions, obtained the material, but did say they had been stored in “a dilapidated warehouse.”

“Few Iranians knew where it was — very few,” Netanyahu said.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Iran nuclear deal: agreement in Vienna. From left to right: Foreign ministers/secretaries of state Wang Yi (China), Laurent Fabius (France), Frank-Walter Steinmeier (Germany), Federica Mogherini (EU), Mohammad Javad Zarif (Iran), Philip Hammond (UK), John Kerry (USA).

And now more details on the Iran mission have since emerged. A senior Israeli official told The New York Times that Mossad first discovered the unnamed warehouse in Tehran in February 2016, and began its surveillance from there.

The official also claimed that Mossad agents broke into the building one night in January 2018, took the 110,000 documents, and returned them to Israel that same night.

Little else is known, although Israel’s announcement of the raid is likely part of its psychological warfare against Iran.

Iranian media has remained quiet on the raid, likely embarrassed that the spy agency stole an incredible number of documents under the cover of night.

But the value of the stolen documents that have so far been made public is up for debate.

While the White House said Netanyahu’s presentation provided “new and compelling details” about Iran’s past behaviours, some experts disagreed.

“Everything he said was already known to the IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] and published,” Jeffrey Lewis, a nuclear-policy expert at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, tweeted.

“There is literally nothing new here and nothing that changes the wisdom of the JCPOA.”

JCPOA stands for Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action and is the formal name for the Iran nuclear deal.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY MILSPOUSE

Team from 10th Special Forces Group wins Best Warrior Competition

Earlier in August, a team from the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) won the 2020 Best Warrior Competition that was organized by the 1st Special Forces Command (1st SFC).

The 10th SFG team was comprised of a Special Forces Engineer Sergeant (18C), who competed in the NCO category, and a Nodal Network Systems Operator-Maintainer (25N) who competed in the junior enlisted category. Both soldiers came from the 2nd Battalion of the Group and had previously won a unit-level competition that qualified them from the big event.


Because of the Coronavirus pandemic, the competition was conducted virtually. Teams from across the command competed in a series of events.

The competition was broken up into a series of several events that assessed soldiers holistically. Competing teams had to take the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT), shoot the M4 qualification test, write an essay, take a military knowledge exam, complete a 12-mile ruck march, and answer questions for an oral military board. Attention to detail throughout the competition was paramount, and teams were even graded on the correctness of their uniforms.

The Engineer Sergeant explained that some of the tasks were unfamiliar even for a Special Forces operator.

“I have very little background in Army doctrine and the reasons they do certain things,” he said in a press release. “It got me out of my comfort zone and now I have a greater base of knowledge than I did prior to this.”

The junior member of the 10th SFG team added that “it was definitely weird for us because you can’t see who you’re competing against. It’s a different feeling for sure and in a competition that really drives me.”

Both soldiers remained anonymous due to the sensitive nature of their job.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) snipers training at Fort Carson (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Jacob Krone).

1st SFC is responsible for the Army’s Special Forces Groups (there are five active duty, 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 10th, and two National Guard, 19th and 20th), the 75th Ranger Battalion, the 4th and 8th Psychological Operations Groups, and the 95th Civil Affairs Brigade.

The command sergeant major of 2/10th SFG said that “hands down I’m proud, they represent the battalion very well. This battalion has a blue-collar work ethic, so if they’re going to do it, they’re going to do it to the best of their ability.”

Green Berets primarily specialize on Unconventional Warfare, Foreign Internal Defence, Direct Action, and Special Reconnaissance. True to their soldier-diplomat nature, they embed with a partner force, which, depending on the situation, might be a guerrilla group or a government army, and work with and through that local force to increase their effectiveness and achieve their mission.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

(Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Gregory Brook)

Special Forces soldiers deploy in 12-man Special Operations Detachment Alphas (ODAs). Each ODA is comprised of an officer, warrant officer, operations sergeant, intelligence sergeant, and two weapons, engineer, communications, and medical sergeants. The idea behind the duplicate military occupational specialties is to enable the ODA to split into two, or even more, smaller teams.

The 10th SFG troops had to prepare for the competition while still excelling at their jobs. “Right from the beginning you could tell that they were putting in the effort to study and brush up on warrior tasks,” added their sergeant major. “Ultimately they displayed impressive levels of physical and mental toughness.”

Special Forces teams are often the first in a hot spot because of their unique combinations of combat effectiveness and cultural expertise. They led the campaign against al-Qaida and the Taliban in Afghanistan; they invaded northern Iraq and held numerical superior enemy forces during the 2003 Iraqi invasion; and they were the first in Iraq to stop the Islamic State onslaught.

This article originally appeared on Sandboxx. Follow Sandboxx on Facebook.

Humor

5 Army instructions that are broken down way too stupidly

Sometimes you just got to break it down, “Barney-style,” for some soldiers. You know, instruct them in such an easy-to-follow manner that even a kid watching Barney could understand.


As much as we’d all like to pretend that no one in our unit got into the Army through an ASVAB waiver, the fact remains: There’re friggin’ idiots everywhere who need to be told exactly what to do. There are so many simple instructions in the Army, designed so that even our crayon-eating Marine brothers could easily follow them.

Related: 6 reasons soldiers hate on the Marines

These are our favorite, dumbed-down directions.

5. Claymore Mine

Need to set up a Claymore anti-personnel mine, but you’re not quite sure which direction it’s supposed to be pointed? Just remember: front toward enemy.

Mess that up and everyone who’s left in your unit will f*cking hate you.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
At least it lets the as***le Prius driver behind you know to stop tailgating. (Image via Reddit)

4. Army Combatives

If you’ve never had the opportunity to glance through the old-school Army Combatives Manual, you’re missing out.

You’re skipping out on learning lovely, advanced techniques, like how to uppercut someone, how to palm-strike someone in the chin, and, of course…

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
…the swift kick to the nuts: the great equalizer. (Image via Army)

3. MRE

The much-joked-about, flameless heater in the MRE seems simple enough. Put in water, fold the ends, and lean against a “rock or something.”

It actually was meant as a joke when the designer said, “I don’t know. Let’s make it a rock or something.”

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Instructions unclear; got troops stuck in 15-year war. (Image by WATM)

2. AT-4

Pretend you’ve never touched a rocket launcher before. How would you hold it?

Thankfully, the instructions include a tiny drawing and the words, “fire like this.”

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
How else would you be able to fire it? (Image via IMFDB)

1. Army Combat Boots

It’s so simple. It’s written in black and white. Our boots are not authorized for flight or combat use.

Come on, guys. What kind of idiot would void the warranty like that? Oh…

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Apparently, this is just so they don’t need to replace our boots. Thanks, Army. (Image via Reddit)

MIGHTY TRENDING

It’s been 10 years since the Air Force retired the Nighthawk

It’s been 10 years since the United States Air Force retired the F-117 Nighthawk (an aircraft so secret, Nevada folklore labeled it a UFO).

“The Nighthawk pilots were known by the call sign ‘Bandit,’ each earning their number with their first solo flight. Some of the maintainers were also given a call sign,” said Wayne Paddock, a former F-117 maintainer currently stationed at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico.


“The people who maintained the coatings on the aircraft radar absorbent material were classified as material application and repair specialists (MARS). MARS morphed into Martians,” Paddock said. “MARS was a shred out from the structural repair/corrosion control career field.”

The technology for the F-117 was developed in the 1970s as a capability for attacking high value targets without being detected by enemy radar. It had up to 5,000 pounds of assorted internal stores, two engines, and could travel up to 684 mph.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Four F-117A Nighthawksu00a0perform one last flyover at the Sunset Stealth retirement ceremony at Holloman AFB, N.M., April 21, 2008. The F-117A flew under the flag of the 49th Fighter Wing at Holloman Air Force Base from 1992 to its retirement in 2008.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Colbert)

“It was the first airplane designed and built as a low-observable, stable, and therefore precise platform,” said Yancy Mailes, director of the history and museums program for Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and a former F-117 maintainer.

“It was the marriage of the GBU-27 to the F-117 that had a laser designator in its nose that made it such a precise, deadly platform,” Mailes said. “It was best demonstrated during Operation Desert Storm when pilots snuck into Iraq and dropped weapons down the elevator shaft of a central communications building in Iraq.”

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
A back lit front view of an F-117 Nighthawk.
(Airman Magazine photo)

The first Nighthawk flew June 18, 1981, and the original F-117A unit, the 4450th Tactical Group (renamed the 37th Tactical Fighter Wing in October 1989) achieved initial operating capability in October 1983. The Nighthawk originally saw combat during Operation Just Cause in 1989, when two F-117s from the 37th TFW attacked military targets in Panama. The aircraft was also in action during Operation Desert Shield.

Retired Col. Jack Forsythe, remembers being excited when he initially flew a Nighthawk while stationed at Holloman AFB in 1995.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Retired Air Force Col. Jack Forsythe in front of the flag F-117 at Tonopah Air Force Base, Nev., after the last mission April 22, 2008. Forsythe led the four-ship formation that flew the Nighthawk to its resting place.

“It was a unique experience,” he said. “It’s probably the same feeling that a lot of our (single seat) F-22 and F-35 pilots feel today.”

After 25 years of service, the Nighthawk retired April 22, 2008. Forsythe led the four-ship formation to Palmdale, California, where Lockheed Martin staff said their farewells.

“We lowered the bomb doors of each aircraft and people signed their names to the doors,” Forsythe said. “It was really just kind of neat; they had designed it, built it, and maintained it for these 25 years, so it really hit home – the industry and Air Force partnership that made the Nighthawk great. I think the four of us were just really struck by that and have some really great memories of that flight.”

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
From left: retired Col. Jack Forsythe, Lt. Col. Mark Dinkard, 49th Operations Group deputy, Lt. Col. Todd Flesch, 8th Fighter Squadron commander, Lt. Col. Ken Tatum, 9th Fighter Squadron commander, after retiring the last four F-117s to Tonopah Air Force Base, Nevada April 22, 2008.

The American flag was painted on the entire underside of his F-117 by the maintainers to help celebrate American airpower.

“I think we all recognized that this was something historic,” he said. “We retired an airplane that people still reference today. We really understood that, so it was a sentimental flight to say the least. It was a great weapon system, very stable and easy to fly. It’s still a memorable experience.”

This article originally appeared on the United States Air Force. Follow @USAirforce on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of April 13

It appears that the military’s very own meme branch is getting its own series on Netflix on May 29. Space Force is set to star Steve Carell and will be helmed by Carell and showrunner of the American version of The Office, Greg Daniels.

In all fairness, they seem to be grasping the concept of the Space Force being a smaller entity within the DoD to protect satellites and how monotonous it will get after awhile fairly spot on. So basically, it’s The Office. In space… Office Space? Wait, no. That name’s taken…

This is awesome news for anyone else sick of hearing about Tiger King. I’ve never seen that show but through meme-mitosis, I can assume it’s about what happens in the surrounding areas of a military base. I may be desperate for entertainment, but I’m not desperate enough to see what the people at the Wal-Mart outside of Fort Sill would do with a tiger. And hopefully Space Force delivers on that.

Anyways, here are your memes for the week:

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F3_AgyGQ4pBVln3rWHJSXxxsLCo-oVdhoovOfWo3H-u3FCB-dgkdljko9-dX0VSrzLeK-EHfHd0-c8iHjMVNqxIV4JX8N1x5adbJHvfYb&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=829&h=e70d2c988ceb41388836aaa8e1c6f79705c969129139805740dc5f9ab55a0bf3&size=980x&c=4150329853 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F3_AgyGQ4pBVln3rWHJSXxxsLCo-oVdhoovOfWo3H-u3FCB-dgkdljko9-dX0VSrzLeK-EHfHd0-c8iHjMVNqxIV4JX8N1x5adbJHvfYb%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D829%26h%3De70d2c988ceb41388836aaa8e1c6f79705c969129139805740dc5f9ab55a0bf3%26size%3D980x%26c%3D4150329853%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Army as F*ck)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FZnfepFd5iRaip8U6_3CuXG7KMms3lcwFCOxM5thNLnP7a9q1jof6iDqT85Cf2qPgxPa761IhMgUeNt7eEmsLI_1fmtTB23UA-HrQpyu7U3NjRYe03m_XeCVL82gigZuJkHsV09hgkSwXukHrkQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=646&h=efb0e013e94bf090d29881f915057db60913e507577e3eda3b51996902c137f1&size=980x&c=1201579727 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FZnfepFd5iRaip8U6_3CuXG7KMms3lcwFCOxM5thNLnP7a9q1jof6iDqT85Cf2qPgxPa761IhMgUeNt7eEmsLI_1fmtTB23UA-HrQpyu7U3NjRYe03m_XeCVL82gigZuJkHsV09hgkSwXukHrkQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D646%26h%3Defb0e013e94bf090d29881f915057db60913e507577e3eda3b51996902c137f1%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1201579727%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Disgruntled Vets)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FRTIg4IDjzT9ho8Tih_JIEhXwsx3FOwG55fi_F02Z-7UbKTssHZt5I5BVRY3N-2lY5ZkJqIghtJWlxb_4q_LmzNLbVUXJ-lkYLvvbiKGoCZxlxz134fXkgesXaXAxeqSJyeRikUS0sqoGcrEf1w&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=645&h=a876bb248eb966c787fbb74711127efb5ed87335182aaa595c3ce4afa2306d8e&size=980x&c=818651597 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FRTIg4IDjzT9ho8Tih_JIEhXwsx3FOwG55fi_F02Z-7UbKTssHZt5I5BVRY3N-2lY5ZkJqIghtJWlxb_4q_LmzNLbVUXJ-lkYLvvbiKGoCZxlxz134fXkgesXaXAxeqSJyeRikUS0sqoGcrEf1w%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D645%26h%3Da876bb248eb966c787fbb74711127efb5ed87335182aaa595c3ce4afa2306d8e%26size%3D980x%26c%3D818651597%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via US Army WTF Moments Memes)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FeEsWjHiV3rczqroeRASN27Kc1UwtkM95pv2HZ57PrpnHjtQwF4DOFZzhYGceILpcB6d8VgcO34OLeaV_pnPoatqYaGbjv70xkZotJMcn7He-G3OhLqp3uISAS1tnD62YKrN6dV0B&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=575&h=03b88d33edc11c04d19759684db65e9d03897ae57bfed1b929baf674a9b1b2ec&size=980x&c=521461964 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FeEsWjHiV3rczqroeRASN27Kc1UwtkM95pv2HZ57PrpnHjtQwF4DOFZzhYGceILpcB6d8VgcO34OLeaV_pnPoatqYaGbjv70xkZotJMcn7He-G3OhLqp3uISAS1tnD62YKrN6dV0B%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D575%26h%3D03b88d33edc11c04d19759684db65e9d03897ae57bfed1b929baf674a9b1b2ec%26size%3D980x%26c%3D521461964%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Call for Fire)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FvjGgH6AH-6DBSk8LhYPiknbQDXhHrQZ3OMgsdpPnK0CXdcZ-09_MUGY-3zeISso2BIetclls3Ba-8cT7zStXSDeuMNXSK-IH0AMFRXQCALFFEd8Y6_ctk0ft_XTWtDjqg3HbWtlxGYHCaYDD8A&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=275&h=dcf55095db7e05d9daad40f0c2dceffe032c8690bcd96b2b86ecc4be55a6fc31&size=980x&c=697830099 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FvjGgH6AH-6DBSk8LhYPiknbQDXhHrQZ3OMgsdpPnK0CXdcZ-09_MUGY-3zeISso2BIetclls3Ba-8cT7zStXSDeuMNXSK-IH0AMFRXQCALFFEd8Y6_ctk0ft_XTWtDjqg3HbWtlxGYHCaYDD8A%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D275%26h%3Ddcf55095db7e05d9daad40f0c2dceffe032c8690bcd96b2b86ecc4be55a6fc31%26size%3D980x%26c%3D697830099%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Not CID)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FkJGC80LZswAci0bO5CUMuk4HtKKAAugou1ocYTP5cFUK-ylnag5v-lfcFhG3XUO7BZOi77U7Er9G2lGl8ZjNHNQH-eC39M5-_TFxKjAAswywfbf3zd-qyETDu8oxqonaNOA9k-zcmN46qG7RvQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=470&h=0bce27ee5656923d0bdaa67286e0cb6a1e7cedaf760aab82afbef6c40002bc66&size=980x&c=748443404 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FkJGC80LZswAci0bO5CUMuk4HtKKAAugou1ocYTP5cFUK-ylnag5v-lfcFhG3XUO7BZOi77U7Er9G2lGl8ZjNHNQH-eC39M5-_TFxKjAAswywfbf3zd-qyETDu8oxqonaNOA9k-zcmN46qG7RvQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D470%26h%3D0bce27ee5656923d0bdaa67286e0cb6a1e7cedaf760aab82afbef6c40002bc66%26size%3D980x%26c%3D748443404%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Infantry Follow Me)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FsZq49eOUDiIC4RC6Pb1swWeliKORYKhoVBH2SAn_ZXpa00Ba2K2ty3lHa6Pmu88HbEToaPC_ejSqaPi6tYhs5anGmWwL_k793xQGmu4zBGEdMX_uP_Nl8eQ2E755P8GK3Y7_1GLPejULVdqwJg&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=274&h=0720d22d9d68e8508ed563e715a11b9fdc82928d0522e02f8aaa905f15856170&size=980x&c=67978889 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FsZq49eOUDiIC4RC6Pb1swWeliKORYKhoVBH2SAn_ZXpa00Ba2K2ty3lHa6Pmu88HbEToaPC_ejSqaPi6tYhs5anGmWwL_k793xQGmu4zBGEdMX_uP_Nl8eQ2E755P8GK3Y7_1GLPejULVdqwJg%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D274%26h%3D0720d22d9d68e8508ed563e715a11b9fdc82928d0522e02f8aaa905f15856170%26size%3D980x%26c%3D67978889%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via The Army’s Fckups)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FnjCOJGvU7g6w1U4YKrx2NwRE8AWhId-gkjMwsFyM8fAvyt1gaJGXm_yehPu38OOf3QfC4beq5ZIlkHjHznB4WbgweNLbFSQy23Zi9z7aWevADhOcKQ5GbseeH8RjLrtuEYk_sVcGV5XhQ0XWsQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=544&h=b4d2b7194ad8c15fc6a9b2fe0136201f4b08ae4704588383c083e080434eb8b3&size=980x&c=1467475325 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FnjCOJGvU7g6w1U4YKrx2NwRE8AWhId-gkjMwsFyM8fAvyt1gaJGXm_yehPu38OOf3QfC4beq5ZIlkHjHznB4WbgweNLbFSQy23Zi9z7aWevADhOcKQ5GbseeH8RjLrtuEYk_sVcGV5XhQ0XWsQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D544%26h%3Db4d2b7194ad8c15fc6a9b2fe0136201f4b08ae4704588383c083e080434eb8b3%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1467475325%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Coast Guard Memes)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F5QW4pNuVL3wazGSITma3Tb1Ve8bumZEBEJTOOMttay2LrMGiUeMLErc0G4nUfdUXsSdtBh2xbRaF3pUPEqMEO1GrXVuEnbD4aHpGSmL0Bu31WEtAMqAFrkE1Fb5wJpJj1g01t1MKLWWvOMflsw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=858&h=5a0a6af1a5f0d3f4a512e8d5ff7de345147cf612fe5bac06c6825dec67fe75c7&size=980x&c=3363932457 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F5QW4pNuVL3wazGSITma3Tb1Ve8bumZEBEJTOOMttay2LrMGiUeMLErc0G4nUfdUXsSdtBh2xbRaF3pUPEqMEO1GrXVuEnbD4aHpGSmL0Bu31WEtAMqAFrkE1Fb5wJpJj1g01t1MKLWWvOMflsw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D858%26h%3D5a0a6af1a5f0d3f4a512e8d5ff7de345147cf612fe5bac06c6825dec67fe75c7%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3363932457%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via PT Belt Nation)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FaUyvTYe0qPieZSarY79HSmJl3isb5ih61NLx2XpGaq4udIJmwvTdcAoVYM1WDRv5Hd7FRlqRhsvkJQrAAE85fs37CrAmxgyqlzzsNxAfpAuUAfP60tVUMBf1YoMrPJufV9pO8tkQiLZ25pVYog&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=949&h=e8909ff696506f41a3d5eb4b71cdc207db1a245c966952dad55244a2a38c43a1&size=980x&c=376561220 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FaUyvTYe0qPieZSarY79HSmJl3isb5ih61NLx2XpGaq4udIJmwvTdcAoVYM1WDRv5Hd7FRlqRhsvkJQrAAE85fs37CrAmxgyqlzzsNxAfpAuUAfP60tVUMBf1YoMrPJufV9pO8tkQiLZ25pVYog%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D949%26h%3De8909ff696506f41a3d5eb4b71cdc207db1a245c966952dad55244a2a38c43a1%26size%3D980x%26c%3D376561220%22%7D” expand=1]

(meme via Valhalla Wear)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Fgh6cSA8EyMjGVokgHVn-FhVrVuFtuBDf5P3sXR77nJfNUJVesBo4WjDA-BPjV18FqREU4KodcsiPwdPNIgKJ6CIu9tmRuG61ivZCQJHSOeCDd3R8ATWyCH72r1PvUlpHs3tUcdrFZC4dx-SsBw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=694&h=767979a3d87a99fcaaaea98c1862d9fb02356e2b17cd576da025bffde571cb73&size=980x&c=1631914311 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Fgh6cSA8EyMjGVokgHVn-FhVrVuFtuBDf5P3sXR77nJfNUJVesBo4WjDA-BPjV18FqREU4KodcsiPwdPNIgKJ6CIu9tmRuG61ivZCQJHSOeCDd3R8ATWyCH72r1PvUlpHs3tUcdrFZC4dx-SsBw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D694%26h%3D767979a3d87a99fcaaaea98c1862d9fb02356e2b17cd576da025bffde571cb73%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1631914311%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via VET Tv)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Ff6mV0cdP_lFShsNqPpLOmyC-n2dhfE2U2TBgonD8V2uNqlaj3XnDlKxHpdte1fm-wYnpJ7eZ73PYMPu_QCbpDDBNkOqC_MTpGSAMx0QbBYWq_wcSlGCi8TmP6bcOLk5K_EuSEQvZdoBDQ0uJDQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=477&h=3acf0f61d1f84a09b49758e7a052c5be492814918df4aa00ccfbbb9018878b77&size=980x&c=1433129436 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Ff6mV0cdP_lFShsNqPpLOmyC-n2dhfE2U2TBgonD8V2uNqlaj3XnDlKxHpdte1fm-wYnpJ7eZ73PYMPu_QCbpDDBNkOqC_MTpGSAMx0QbBYWq_wcSlGCi8TmP6bcOLk5K_EuSEQvZdoBDQ0uJDQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D477%26h%3D3acf0f61d1f84a09b49758e7a052c5be492814918df4aa00ccfbbb9018878b77%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1433129436%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Decelerate Your Life)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FZ5eZsH3UAJ2YBvBV7reula3mqOS2WvgyjDGuN_QJP7PRRPjRcYcnhekzTgO6U4qeLv64hAciQN6Qt32lSdtM4sJtINxWD2yW55e1PFOJ3gzmpFB2Dn-TYVRWQ_S4E2jbtrlJVjiJuQHl_SMXeQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=151&h=7fe190d73e7ce1343b826a798bdd57576784637293d2dbbe0cab0f5f812c93dd&size=980x&c=2576007839 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FZ5eZsH3UAJ2YBvBV7reula3mqOS2WvgyjDGuN_QJP7PRRPjRcYcnhekzTgO6U4qeLv64hAciQN6Qt32lSdtM4sJtINxWD2yW55e1PFOJ3gzmpFB2Dn-TYVRWQ_S4E2jbtrlJVjiJuQHl_SMXeQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D151%26h%3D7fe190d73e7ce1343b826a798bdd57576784637293d2dbbe0cab0f5f812c93dd%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2576007839%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Pop Smoke)

MIGHTY HISTORY

This train thief earned the first Medal of Honor

Army Pvt. Jacob Parrott was only 19 when a civilian spy and contraband smuggler proposed a daring plan, asking for volunteers: A small group of men was to sneak across Confederate lines, steal a train, and then use it as a mobile base to destroy Confederate supply and communications lines while the Union Army advanced on Chattanooga.


Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

It was for this raid that the Army would first award a newly authorized medal, the Medal of Honor. Jacob Parrott received the very first one.

The military and political situation in April, 1862, was bad for the Union. European capitals were considering recognizing the Confederacy as its own state, and the Democrats were putting together a campaign platform for the 1862 mid-terms that would turn them into a referendum on the war.

Meanwhile, many in the country thought that the Army was losing too many troops for too little ground.

It was against this backdrop that Union Gen. Ormsby Mitchel heard James J. Andrews’ proposal to ease Mitchel’s campaign against Chattanooga with a train raid. Mitchel approved the mission and Andrews slipped through Confederate lines with his volunteers on April 7, 1862.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

An illustration for The Penn publishing company depicting the theft of the “General” locomotive by Andrews’ Raiders.

(Illustration by William Pittenger, Library of Congress)

The men made their way to the rail station at Chattanooga and rode from there to Marietta, Georgia, a city in the northern part of the state. En route, two men were arrested. Another two overslept on the morning of April 12 and missed the move from Marietta to Big Shanty, a small depot.

Big Shanty was chosen for the site of the train hijacking because it lacked a telegraph station with which to relay news of the theft. The theory was that, as long as the raiders stayed ahead of anyone from Big Shanty, they could continue cutting wires and destroying track all the way to Chattanooga without being caught.

At Big Shanty, the crew and passengers of the train pulled by the locomotive “The General” got off to eat, and Andrews’ Raiders, as they would later be known, took over the train and drove it north as fast as they could. Three men from the railroad gave chase, led by either Anthony Murphy or William Fuller. Both men would later claim credit for the pursuit. Either way, “The Great Locomotive Chase” was on.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

An illustration for The Penn publishing company shows Andrews’ Raiders conducting sabotage.

(Illustration by William Pittenger, Library of Congress)

For the next seven hours and 87 miles, the Raiders destroyed short sections of track and cut telegraph wires while racing to stay ahead of Fuller, Murphy, and the men who helped them along the way. The Raiders were never able to open a significant lead on the Confederates and were forced to cut short their acquisition of water and wood at Tilton, Georgia.

This led to “The General” running out of steam just a little later. The Raiders had achieved some success, but had failed to properly destroy any bridges, and the damage to the telegraph wires and tracks proved relatively quick to repair.

Mitchel, meanwhile, had decided to move only on Huntsville that day and delayed his advance on Chattanooga. All damage from the raid would be repaired before it could make a strategic difference.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

An illustration for The Penn publishing company depicting the Ohio tribute to Andrews’ Raiders.

(Illustration by William Pittenger, Library of Congress)

The Raiders, though, attempted to flee the stopped train but were quickly rounded up. Eight of them, including Andrews, were executed as spies in Atlanta. Many of the others, including Parrott, were subjected to some level of physical mistreatment, but were left alive.

Parrott and some of the other soldiers were returned in a prisoner exchange in March, 1863. Despite its small impact on the war, the raid was big news in the North and the men were received as heroes. Parrott was awarded the Medal of Honor that month, the first man to receive it. Five other Raiders would later receive the medal as well.

www.youtube.com

“The General” went on an odd tour after the war, serving as a rallying symbol for both Union and Confederate sympathizers. “The General” was displayed at the Ohio Monument to the Andrews’ Raiders in 1891. The following year, it was sent to Chattanooga for the reunion of the Army of the Cumberland.

In 1962, it reprised its most famous moments in a reenactment of the raid to commemorate the centennial of the Medal of Honor. It now sits in the Southern Museum of Civil War Locomotive History in Kennesaw, Georgia, the same spot from which it was stolen and the chase began.

popular

Apple cider vinegar should be in your diet right now

Every so often, a new health trend emerges and takes the fitness industry by storm. Once the right celebrity endorses it, suddenly, everyone swears it works wonders and people flood the stores to buy it. However, the best advertising around is still word of mouth. That’s how many people are discovering the health benefits of ingesting small amounts of apple cider vinegar daily.


Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
A well-stocked grocery store shelf filled with apple cider vinegar.

(Mike Mozart)

Although the organic fluid isn’t very appetizing, it contains a powerful compound called “acetic acid.” Acetic acid is a carboxylic compound with both anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. This unique acid lowers insulin levels (a hormone that causes weight gain), improves insulin resistance, and decreases blood sugar.

Since apple cider vinegar isn’t known for its excellent taste, consumers typically dilute a tablespoon of the insulin-resistant fluid into tall glass of water spiked with the juice from half a lemon. Many people intake the mixture twice a day — once in the morning and again at night.

If you do decide to try out this weight-loss strategy, be sure to purchase organic vinegar to guarantee its purity. There are several imitators out there and, if you want the acetic acid to work its magic properly, you must go organic.

Now, there is one drawback to the weight-loss tactic. Since the main ingredient is an acid, drinking too much can erode your tooth enamel, which isn’t pretty.

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets
Tooth damage caused by drinking vinegar.

(motivational doc)

However, this drawback typically only happens when you drink the vinegar straight, without diluting it. And trust us, you don’t want to do that. It may be an effective, natural weight-loss solution, but it is not a tasty beverage. Now, for all of our E-3 and below personnel, this inexpensive weight-loss idea could be the perfect alternative too all the pricey fat-burning pills available on the market or volunteering for a deployment. 

MIGHTY TACTICAL

This is the Army’s new rocket-assisted artillery round

Army artillery experts are inching closer to the service’s short-term goal of developing a 155-millimeter cannon that will shoot out to 70 kilometers, more than doubling the range of current 155s.

Under the Extended Range Cannon Artillery program, or ERCA, M109A8 155 mm Paladin self-propelled howitzers will be fitted with much longer, 58-caliber gun tubes, redesigned chambers, and breeches that will be able to withstand the gun pressures to get out to 70 kilometers, Col. John Rafferty, director of the Long Range Precision Fires Cross-Functional Team, told an audience in October 2018 at the 2018 Association of the United States Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.


Existing 155 mm artillery rounds have a range of about 30 kilometers when fired from systems such as the M109A7, which feature a standard, 39-caliber-length gun tube.

But a longer gun tube is only one part of the extended range effort, Rafferty said.

“The thing about ERCA that makes it more complicated than others is it is as much about the ammunition as is it is about the armament,” he said. “We can’t take our current family of projectiles and shoot them 70 kilometers; they are not designed for it.”

Check out these great Black Friday deals on gaming headsets

M109A7 155mm self propelled howitzer.

The Army is finalizing a new version of a rocket-assisted projectile (RAP) round that testers have shot out to 62 kilometers at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, said Col. Will McDonough, who runs Project Manager Combat Ammunition Systems.

The XM1113 is an upgrade to the M549A1 rocket-assisted projectile round, which was first fielded in 1989, he said.

“It’s going to have 20 percent more impulse than the RAP round had,” McDonough said. “So I look at that and say, ‘Wow, we moved the ball 20 percent in 30 years.’ Obviously not acceptable, but we … shot it out of a 58-caliber system and shot holes in the ground at Yuma out to 62 kilometers.”

The Army will add improvements to the round that should enable testers to “put holes in the ground out to 70 kilometers,” he said. “One of the things our leadership has been adamant about is don’t talk about range. Show range, shoot range, and then you can talk about it. But if you haven’t put a hole in the ground in the desert, don’t advertise that you can go do it.”

The long-range precision fires effort is the Army’s top modernization priority. The effort’s longer-term goals include developing the Precision Strike Missile, with a range out to 499 kilometers, and the Strategic Long Range Cannon, which could have a range of up to 1,000 nautical miles.

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Stream the epic 90s soundtrack from ‘Captain Marvel’ right here

In all the chatter about Captain Marvel, one aspect of the film simply isn’t getting discussed enough: the fact that it’s the first 21st superhero movie to be a period piece to be specifically set in the 1990s. This is cool for several reasons. Not only does this subtly reference the fact that Samuel L. Jackson was totally the shit in the ’90s, but it’s also rad for those of us teenagers to remember a simpler time of Blockbuster Video and the last decade where people really listened to songs on the radio.


The best part of this Captain Marvel nostalgia fest is the soundtrack. Featuring ’90s mega-hits like TLC’s “Waterfalls,” Nirvana’s “Come As You Are,” and No Doubt’s “I’m Just a Girl,” the soundtrack also has some deeper cuts like Elastica’s “Connection,” and R.E.M.’s “Crush With Eyeliner.” In the same way that the first Guardians of the Galaxy “Awesome Mix” celebrated the ’70s, the Captain Marvel soundtrack crushes on the ‘9os real hard. (Let’s also try to remember how strange this “Whatta Man” Salt N’ Pepper lyric is: “A body like Arnold and a Denzel face.” Would we want to meet such a chimera in real life?)

Disney has released the orchestral score of the film (composed by Pinar Toprak) but you can’t actually buy a physical version of the soundtrack featuring all the great grunge, hip-hop and pop ’90s hits. But don’t worry! There’s an Apple playlist (above) that has all the big ’90s songs mixed in with the new score. Come as you are. Listen to it now and have a better day.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

Do Not Sell My Personal Information