Everything you need to know about the different types of beer - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

Summer is officially here, which means it’s perfectly acceptable to drink outside again. Whether you’re at a backyard barbecue or a baseball game, beer is often the drink of choice when the temps heat up. And what’s not to love? It’s cold, refreshing, and (usually) cheap. But with all of the different styles on the market, ordering a simple cerveza can get confusing if you don’t know what you’re looking for.

A list of beers on tap at a bar can give you all kinds of anxiety. And without someone there to explain it all, you throw up your hands and order a Long Island Iced Tea instead. But fear not, we’ve decoded the differences between some of the most common types of beers so you can have a little more confidence the next time you want to order a cold one (or two).


All beers contain a combination of water, grain, yeast, and hops — the plant that preserves the beer and gives it its unique flavor. The distinguishing factor between the different types is how they are brewed, which affects the look and taste. Lagers and ales are different varieties that fall under the larger beer umbrella. In fact, IPAs are a subcategory of ales (more on that later).

Lager

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

Lager is the most common style of beer. It’s name comes from the German word, “lagern,” which means “to store.” Lagers are made with bottom-fermenting yeast, and are left in cooler temperatures (45-55 degrees Fahrenheit) for weeks while the fermentation process takes place.

Lagers tend to have a light, crisp taste and a smooth, well-balanced flavor. They are often less bitter than other styles of beers. If you had to compare beer to wine, lager would be more similar to white wine. Pilsners and malt liquor are different styles within the lager category. Many of the most common brands of beer such as Heineken, Sapporo, and Budweiser can be classified as lagers. Lagers pair well with shellfish, grilled chicken or pork, and Mexican food.

Ales

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

Of all the beer styles, ales are the oldest. During the Middle Ages, people chose ale to hydrate themselves to avoid the threat of contamination in the water.

Ales are brewed with top-fermenting yeast. Fermentation takes place in warm temperatures (between 68 and 72 degrees Fahrenheit), which speeds up the process. For this reason, ales don’t have to be stored for long periods of time.

The yeast rises to the top during fermentation, and as a result, ales generally have a thick layer of foam (also known as the beer head) at the top.

The flavor of an ale tends to be more complex than that of lagers. They also tend to have a fruitier taste. Ales are more comparable to red wines. Ales pair well with burgers, Asian food, and pizza.

IPA

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

They say necessity is the mother of invention, and this is definitely true in the case of the IPA. India pale ale was invented by a London-based brewer for English troops stationed in India.

India’s warm climate was not ideal for making beer, and English brews would not survive the six-month journey journey at sea. So in the late 1700s, George Hodgson exported a strong pale ale to Englishmen in India. He added extra hops and increased the alcohol content, which helped preserve the beer over the long journey. The soldiers even claimed it had a better taste. IPAs gained popularity in the United States in the 1970s.

There are three styles of IPAs – American, English, and Double/Imperial. And while they don’t all taste the same, IPAs are often described as bitter. They pair well with spicy, salty, and grilled foods.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

Articles

This is what some of your fave sci-fi fighters would look like assigned to the US military

Think of the most famous starfighters of film and TV. You know them — The X-wing, the Y-wing, the VF-1 Valkyrie, the Colonial Viper, the F-302 — pop culture has gifted us with many famous planes we fly in our dreams… or on our personal computers and game consoles.


But if they existed for real, which squadrons would they be assigned to?

Here’s what We Are The Mighty is thinking:

Valkyrie from Robotech

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

Suggested Markings: VF-84 “Jolly Rogers”

The cartoon Robotech gave us this variable-configuration multi-role aerospace fighter in its first season, which was based on the Japanese anime Super Dimension Fortress Macross. With the jet mode looking like an F-14 and the famous “Skull One,” the markings from VF-84, the “Jolly Rogers,” are really the only call you can make.

Colonial Viper from Battlestar Galactica (Either Series)

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Suggested Markings: VMFA-323 “Death Rattlers”

The Colonial Viper was an icon of whichever iteration of Battlestar Galactica you watched, whether it’s the classic one with Lorne Greene as Commander Adama and Dirk Benedict as the Starbuck, or whether it’s the new version with Edward James Olmos as Adama and Katie Sackoff as Starbuck. A number of squadrons have adopted nicknames based on snakes, but Marine Fighter Attack Squadron-323’s “Death Rattlers” seem particularly appropriate. The Vipers dominated their opponents when not caught by surprise or disabled by a cyber-attack – dealing death out far more than they received it.

Cylon Raider from Battlestar Galactica (Either Series)

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

Suggested Markings: VFA-127 “Cylons”

Yes, this is an adversary unit. But there is no other squadron arsenal appropriate for the front-line fighter used by the villains of either version Battlestar Galactica.

Incom X-Wing Fighter from Star Wars

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Suggested Markings: VF-194 “Red Lightning”

“Red Five standing by.” Luke Skywalker’s call in the first Star Wars movie makes this designation a good one. Coincidentally, one of the planes flown by Navy Fighter Squadron-194, the F-8 Crusader, featured four 20mm cannon – while the X-wing has four lasers that proved to be capable of destroying TIE fighters easily.

Koensayr BTL Y-wing from Star Wars

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Suggested Markings: VA-128 “Golden Intruders”

Best known as the fighters flown by the ill-fated Gold Squadron in the first Star Wars movie, the Y-wing was intended as an attack plane – and in the first movie, the Y-wings were torn to bits by Darth Vader’s TIE fighters (with only one surviving the Battle of Yavin). So, Attack Squadron-128, which flew the A-6 Intruder, seems to be appropriate markings for this space fighter.

Gou’ald Death Glider from Stargate SG-1

sci-fi-fighters-gouald-death-glider-from-stargate-sg-1

Suggested Markings: 160th Fighter Squadron “Snakes”

This is another case where an easy call comes in. Gou’ald were called “snakes” by the heroes of Stargate SG-1. So, the 160th Fighter Squadron, Alabama Air National Guard — also called the “Snakes” — is really the only fitting mockup for this fighter.

Starfury from Babylon 5

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Suggested Markings: 1st Fighter Squadron “Fighting Furies”

This was a space-superiority fighter designed to take on other fighters. The 1st Fighter Squadron flew the F-15C Eagle, the definitive “not a pound air-to-ground” fighter in Air Force service. Appropriately, the 1st Fighter Squadron was called the “Fighting Furies.”

Thunderfighter from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century

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Suggested Markings: 336th Fighter Squadron “Rocketeers”

At the start of the 1980s series Buck Rogers, the title character went into space on a rocket before things went south and he had 500 years in a deep freeze. Using the livery of the 336th Fighter Squadron makes a lot of sense, particularly since the F-15E is also a multi-role fighter that can be a capable dogfighter.

PWF-12 Peregrine Fighter from Deep Space Nine

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Suggested Markings: VF-96 “Fighting Falcons”

This fighter is another multi-role vessel, which could handle opposing fighters like the Romulan Scorpion or take on capital ships with proton torpedoes. With a decent war load, and a two-man crew, it seems reminiscent of the F-4 Phantom. Fighter Squadron-96 saw several tours during Vietnam, and was notable for producing the only Navy ace of that conflict. Their nickname also fits with this Starfleet fighter.

Sienar Fleet Systems TIE Advanced x1 from Star Wars

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Suggested Markings: VMF(AW)-114 “Death Dealers”

Darth Vader dealt death in this fighter in the first Star Wars movie, scoring six kills and becoming an ace in a day for the bad guys. This fighter was arguably able to take on the snub fighters of the Rebel Alliance in a one-on-one fight. This would make it a “Death Dealer” to any overconfident Rebel pilot.

MIGHTY MOVIES

How a comedian can go from Hollywood to Kabul


Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | Spotify

“It was like walking onto the surface of the moon,” Graham Elwood says of his first experience walking off of a C-17 in Afghanistan.

His experience was not unlike many of our own first times deploying to a far-off edge of the world. We take a long, long C-17 (or god help you, C-130) ride for seemingly endless hours. There are no windows. The plane is packed. Forget about an in-flight movie or looking out the window. And when you walk off, it’s invariably the middle of the night and you and the hundred or so people you’re with walk off the flightline in a single file.

From there, who knows? There’s a good chance the “hurry up and wait” has just begun. For civilians visiting war zones for the first time, it’s no different – except they have no idea how to speak the acronym language.

“They said ‘When your bird hits the LZ, find your POC, they’ll take you to the MWR tent then you can go to the DFAC,'” he jokes. “It’s like… what are you saying to me right now, man?”

Elwood is a Los Angeles-based comedian with appearances in comedy clubs across America, on college campuses, and even CBS’ Late Late Show. He’s also a veteran podcaster with shows like Comedy Film Nerds, and The Political Vigilante, and he’s a co-creator of the Los Angeles Podcast Festival.

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None of that prepared him for performing for U.S. troops deployed in combat zones. His first documentary, LaffghanistanComedy Down Range, is about his first time volunteering to go do just that. It’s amazing how fast you can go from playing the Hollywood Improv to playing Bagram Air Base.

Elwood’s film documents his personal journey from the sunny beaches of Southern California to the sun-baked moonscape of Afghanistan, where the military’s Department of Morale, Welfare and Recreation enlisted him to entertain the troops. Elwood’s psychedelic travels through a war zone are simultaneously hilarious, harrowing, and heartbreaking. His journey becomes unpredictably personal, creating a documentary that no one expected, least of all Graham.

For someone who admits he’s pretty far removed from the Global War on Terror, it all came home to him when went around the small firebases of Afghanistan. It was his first time in helicopters, driving in unarmored vehicles on the ground in Afghanistan, and seeing minefields. It got real for him for him real fast.

“What was said to me and what I’ve said to other comedians,” he says. “Well don’t go over there if you don’t want to be changed. It will change you. You have no idea. This is no joke.”

Now that Elwood has done a number of these shows and tours around deployed military bases, he looks back at his first experience in this episode of Mandatory Fun.

Nothing could adequately prepare him for performing a comedy act in Afghanistan. All the dive bars and sh*t holes he played as a young comedian is the best thing he could do to prepare. He was still freaking out but couldn’t help but put himself in the shoes of young troops.

“I’m here for two weeks,” Elwood says, “and MY family is freaking out. Imagine them and  their families and how much they’re freaking out.”

But they quickly realized that they need to be the comics. They were there for a reason: to give American troops fighting overseas a few laughs, a taste of a normal night, and a show to help ease their tension, even if it was only for a short time.

Mandatory Fun guest: Graham Elwood has been a stand-up comic for over 20 years working comedy clubs, colleges, TV shows, Holiday Inn Lounges, war zones, dive bars, and one time on the top of a double-decker tour bus in Chicago (not joking)

. You’ve probably seen him on the TV as the host of the socially relevant game shows “Cram” (GSN) and “Strip Poker” (USA), along with making the world a better place by appearing on shows like “Best Bodies Ever” on VH1. Don’t forget the time when he told jokes on “The Late Late Show” (CBS). He has also starred in the theatrical plays Speed the Plow, Light Sensitive, and Cash Flow, and co-wrote the one act play Brothers. Learn more about Elwood:

Mandatory Fun is hosted By:

Blake Stilwell: Air Force veteran and Managing Editor

Tim Kirkpatrick: Navy veteran and Editorial Coordinator

Orvelin Valle (aka O.V.): Navy veteran and Podcast Producer

Catch the show on Twitter at: @MandoFun and on our Facebook group.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Darkstar: Is ‘Top Gun’s’ Maverick flying an SR-72?

Yesterday, we revealed that the new movie “Top Gun: Maverick” will feature what appears to be a Russian Su-57, but that’s not the only fictional-fighter shown in the movie’s trailers. Another scene seems to show Maverick flying a next-generation fighter dubbed “Darkstar,” according to the movie’s Matchbox toy line.

The Darkstar aircraft shown only briefly at the end of the movie’s trailer is very clearly not based on anything in operation today… but that doesn’t mean it’s without an analogous real-world platform. While we get a quick peek at the underbelly of the streamlined jet in the trailer, Matchbox’s toy line has actually offered us the best view of this aircraft to date.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
The “Darkstar” Matchbox toy from the film “Top Gun: Maverick”

Based on the shockwave visible as the jet passes overhead in the trailer, it seems likely that this exotic-looking aircraft will introduce hypersonic platforms to the Top Gun universe. Supersonic aircraft (Top Gun’s F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Super Hornet) are capable of flying faster than the speed of sound (Mach 1). Hypersonic aircraft travel much faster — in excess of Mach 5, or around 3800 miles per hour.

Russia and China both claim to have hypersonic missiles in operation, with the United States lagging slightly behind. Thus far, no public aviation program has announced plans to build a hypersonic fighter plane, but there are programs already in motion that could certainly produce one.

The SR-72 in “Top Gun?”

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin, for instance, has been working on developing a successor to the SR-71 Blackbird, the fastest military aircraft in history, that they claim will be able to fly at speeds even higher than Mach 6. Engine testing has already taken place, and it’s feasible that technology demonstrators for the aircraft may already exist. Interestingly enough… the Darkstar toy bears a striking resemblance to Lockheed’s own artist’s depictions of what the forthcoming SR-72 may look like.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Lockheed Martin artist’s rendering of the SR-72 (top) and “Top Gun: Maverick” Darkstar toy (bottom)

There are some differences between the two — most notably the use of two vertical stabilizer fins on the back of the “Darkstar,” with only one central stabilizer on the SR-72. However, because the Lockheed Martin image is nothing more than a conceptual drawing, the final platform (if it ever comes to fruition) could feasibly have either.

If the Darkstar is indeed a stand-in for the SR-72, it may not be intended as a fighter, but rather as a high speed, high altitude reconnaissance platform like its SR-71 predecessor. However, thanks to highly capable spy satellites, this semi-fictional aircraft may well be armed (in the movie, and in real life).

This article originally appeared on Sandboxx. Follow Sandboxx on Facebook.

MIGHTY MOVIES

History of Camp Pendleton in film and television

With its vast training areas and prime location along California’s shorelines, Camp Pendleton is well known for producing the finest fighting forces on the West Coast. What Camp Pendleton might be less known for, however, is that it has been a backdrop to some of America’s most famous films. Throughout Camp Pendleton’s history, multiple movie producers have utilized its training grounds over Hollywood sets to recreate authentic war scenes of our Country’s most famous battles.


“[Working with the entertainment industry] gives us an opportunity to showcase assets and capabilities that are available to production companies,” said U.S. Marine Corps Master Sgt. Katesha Washington, Entertainment Media Liaison Office (EMLO). “It allows us also to accomplish our mission of telling the story of Marines.”

Camp Pendleton has an ongoing story to tell that continues each day. Since the base opened, over 20 films have been produced including “Sands of Iwo Jima,” starring, John Wayne. During the filming which also cast 2,000 Marines, producers transformed the installation to resemble the Japanese island also using elements to resemble the volcanic ash from Mt. Suribachi. Additional familiar titles include TNT’s television series, “The Last Ship,” and Columbia Media Corporation’s, “Battle Los Angeles.”

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

(IMDb)

With access to starstruck active-duty Marines and their familiar training grounds, producers are able to create authentic scenes without a need to hire actors or build sets in some cases. But the Marine Corps does not merely reduce production costs without some benefit. In giving Marines opportunities to share the limelight with some of their favorite characters, the Marine Corps legacy is captured by telling its stories and reaching an audience, they might not typically reach.

For over a century, the Marine Corps has helped producers, writers and directors coordinate personnel, aircraft and equipment. “There are several steps leading up to filming a production,” said U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Matthew Hilton, also with the EMLO. “We figure out how and if we can or cannot support.”

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer

(IMDb)

There have been countless stories told and countless stories yet to be told when it comes to Camp Pendleton’s rich history and tradition. Watching the actions of its Marines and sailors come to life on the big screen, both fictionally and non-fictionally only serves to preserve the Marine Corps heritage and real-life activities. And remember, the next time you watch your favorite action film, it just might have been filmed on the one and only Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton.

MIGHTY MOVIES

This is how your fantasy football skills can help the US war effort

It doesn’t really matter what kind of skills you actually have when playing fantasy football. It doesn’t even matter if you’ve ever played before. The only thing that matters is that you’re playing for a cause.


On Sunday, Nov. 12., the daily fantasy football site FanDuel is hosting its first Duel for a Difference competition. The entire $3 entry fee to the contest will go to Operation Supply Drop, a non-profit organization that supplies morale boosting gear to American troops deployed overseas, as well as wounded warriors in hospitals.

Of course, there’s still a prize for winning the competition. Just because the proceeds go to a good cause doesn’t mean there can’t be a prize – the top spot gets a new GAEMS system, Xbox One console, Plantronics Headset, and 8 of the year’s best new video games. Other prizes include Operation Supply Drop swag and NFL memorabilia.

This is one instance where it really doesn’t matter if you win or lose — it’s a great way to have fun on a Sunday while providing real help to our fighting men and women abroad. FanDuel alone raked in an estimated $1.8 billion in entry fees in 2016, making it the number one daily fantasy site on the internet.

U.S. troops are about to get a cut of that. And you can help make that slice even bigger.

It’s easy. You get a set budget to choose your team. One quarterback, two running backs, three wide receivers, a tight end, a kicker, and a defense. Just like in regular fantasy football, the better the player, the more each individual costs – so you can’t just bump up your team into the Mutant League All-Stars.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Sorry, Cleveland. Webster Slaughter doesn’t play anymore.

But every entry directly helps American soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, and – yes – Coast Guardsmen deployed.

Operation Supply Drop is more than just delivering video games to troops. There are many facets to what they do every day. OSD programs include helping veterans transition back into civilian life, while addressing mental health, homelessness, and employment problems in the veteran community.

Of course, even if you don’t play fantasy football and don’t want to give it a shot, you can always just donate $3 (or however much you want) to Operation Supply Drop.
Articles

Kim Jong Un takes weird photo, internet has a field day

A photograph taken in North Korea’s Ryanggang Province last week shows the country’s leader Kim Jong Un giving what appears to be an impromptu ballroom dancing lesson to assorted onlookers. As is their custom, the good people of Reddit’s Photoshop Battles snatched up the image and began working their irreverent magic.


Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
The guy second from the left is just hoping no one notices his hat blew off.

Also Read: Allahu Quackbar: The internet is trolling ISIS by photoshopping them as rubber ducks

Here are some highlights:

Supreme Leader solves energy crisis!

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user davepollotart

Lil Kim (banana for scale).

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user Winston_The_Ogre

That’s some serious hover-hand.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user artunitinc

I don’t think he’s holding that right…

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user akh

Muzzle discipline!

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user juanes3020

Always knew he was full of hot air.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user wee_froggy

He never even shows up to rehearsal!

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Reddit user TAOLIK

It’s always awkward when there’s an odd number of people in class.

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user WetCoastLife

Bye everybody!

Everything you need to know about the different types of beer
Reddit user Joal0503

Humor

7 life lessons we learned from Gunny Highway in ‘Heartbreak Ridge’

The 1986 movie “Heartbreak Ridge” took the Marine Corps community and audiences by storm as it showcased Gunnery Sgt. Thomas Highway’s rough and tumble personality. Clint Eastwood took on dual roles as he starred in and directed this iconic film role about a man who is on the tail-end of his military service.


Related: 7 life lessons we learned from watching ‘Full Metal Jacket’

Behind Gunny Highway’s tough exterior lies a man who knows plenty about being a career Marine, but also has a need to build relationships as he moves forward in life.

So check out these life lessons that we could all learn from our beloved Gunny.

1. Don’t let anyone punk you

In Gunny’s own words, “be advised that I’m mean, nasty, and tired. I eat concertina wire and piss napalm and I can put a round through a flea’s ass at 200 meters.”

You tell them, Gunny. (images via Giphy)

2. Know exactly who you are

Although the majority of the film’s characters were out to discourage him, that didn’t stop him from being true to himself.

(images via Giphy)

3. Be semi-approachable

Yes, Gunny is a hard ass, but giving a treat to somebody to shut them the hell up is an excellent networking technique.

Gunny always finds a way to make friends. (images via Giphy)

4. Size doesn’t matter

You can have the biggest muscles in the room, but if you don’t have that “thinker” sitting in between your two ears, you don’t have sh*t.

Gunny doesn’t back down. (images via Giphy)

5. Grunts vs. POGs

The rivalry is real.

When you have some trigger time under your belt and know you’re right, sound off to make your point loud and clear.

Get him! (images via Giphy)

Also Read: 8 life lessons from ‘Forrest Gump’ legend Lt. Dan

6. Lead from the front

Leadership is about showing your men that you will fight with them and for them.

(images via Giphy)

7. Being patriotic is a turn on

No matter how hardcore you are, after a long day of kicking ass and taking names, it’s always good to have someone to come home too.

And Gunny lives happily ever after. (images via Giphy)We told you this movie was about relationships.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Wojtek, the 400-pound artillery bear, will get his own movie

Wojtek endeared himself to members of a Polish army unit in 1942 when he alerted them to the presence of a spy in their camp.

The Polish soldiers, who were released by Russia after the German invasion in 1941, were passing through the Middle East on their way back to Europe. Picking up new members on such a trip wouldn’t be unusual, but Wojtek’s case was a little different, because he was a bear.


Wojtek, whose mother is thought to have been shot by hunters, was bought by Polish soldiers while they were in Iran and eventually joined what would become the Polish II Corps’ 22nd artillery supply company in 1942.

Related video:

(Watch more on We Are The Mighty’s YouTube channel!)

He continued with them through Iraq and into Egypt.

To board a ship to Europe in 1943, Wojtek needed to be a soldier, so the Poles formally enlisted him as a private — with his own pay book and serial number.

Wojtek, who eventually weighed well over 400 pounds, also got double rations.

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The badge of the 22nd Artillery Support Company of the 2nd Polish Corps.

“He was like a child, like a small dog. He was given milk from a bottle, like a baby. So therefore he felt that these soldiers are nearly his parents and therefore he trusted in us and was very friendly,” Wojciech Narebski, a Polish soldier who spent three years alongside Wojtek during the war, told the BBC in 2011.

They also shared a name — Wojtek is a diminutive form of the name Wojciech, which means “happy warrior.”

Now Wojtek’s story is being documented in an animation feature by Iain Harvey, an animator and the executive producer of the 1982 adaptation of Raymond Brigg’s children’s story “The Snowman,” which was nominated for an Oscar and is still shown every year at Christmas on British television.

The bear smoked, drank, and wrestled with soldiers

When he was told about Wojtek, Harvey thought the story was “pure fantasy,” he told the Times of London this week. “It’s fantastic to have a piece of magic that’s real.”

Wojtek, who eventually rose to the rank of corporal, became a mascot for his unit.

Soldiers would box and wrestle with the bear, who was also fond of smoking and drinking. “For him one bottle was nothing,” Narebski told the BBC. “He was weighing [440 pounds]. He didn’t get drunk.”

He was trained not to be a threat to people and was “very quiet, very peaceful,” Narebski said. But he didn’t get along with another bear and a monkey that were also adopted by the soldiers.

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Wojtek was a source of good cheer for the unit, Narebski told the BBC. “For people who are far from families, far from their home country, from a psychological viewpoint, it was very important.”

But he was more than good company during the fighting in Italy.

A British soldier at the Battle of Monte Cassino said he was surprised to see the six-foot bear hauling artillery shells to resupply Allied forces. The company’s patch also featured Wojtek carrying a shell.

Filmmakers released a documentary about Wojtek in 2011. Harvey’s project, “A Bear Named Wojtek,” has secured funding from Poland, but he is still seeking a British partner, telling The Times that he would contact Channel 4 and the BBC as well as companies like Netflix.

Harvey’s project is being set up for release on the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day on May 8, 2020.

According to The Times, it will take 30 animators roughly a year to produce the 30-minute film, hand-drawing each scene on a tablet.

Narebski last saw Wojtek in April 1945, before the Battle of Bologna in Italy.

Once his unit was demobilized in Scotland, the bear was resettled at the Edinburgh Zoo.

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A monument to Wojtek in Krakow.

Former members of his unit often visited him at the zoo, where he lived until his death in 1963 at age 21.

Narebski returned to Poland but had trouble keeping in touch with his former comrades — both human and bear — because of restrictions put in place by the Polish government.

He never forgot about Wojtek, however.

“It was very pleasant for me to think about him,” Narebski told the BBC. “I felt like he was my older brother.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

7 Marvel Cinematic Universe films that made $1 billion at global box office

“Captain Marvel” is the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe movie to hit a huge box-office milestone.

The movie just reached $1 billion at the worldwide box office, joining six other MCU movies. “Avengers: Infinity War” even made $2 billion, and is one of only four movies to ever do so.

“Captain Marvel” fought off online trolls, which launched a campaign to tank its Rotten Tomatoes audience score, to become a global phenomenon. The next MCU movie, “Avengers: Endgame,” will likely join this club and shatter box-office records. Among them, it’s projected to open with the biggest debut weekend of all time, beating “Infinity War.”

Below are the seven MCU movies to hit $1 billion, ranked by how much they made globally, according to Box Office Mojo (unadjusted for inflation):


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(Marvel Studios)

7. “Captain Marvel” (2019)

Worldwide box office (so far): id=”listicle-2633895885″ billion

Domestic box office (so far): 8 million

Opening weekend: 3 million

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(Marvel Studios)

6. “Captain America: Civil War” (2016)

Worldwide box office: id=”listicle-2633895885″.15 billion

Domestic box office: 8 million

Opening weekend: 9 million

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(Marvel Studios)

5. “Iron Man 3” (2013)

Worldwide box office: id=”listicle-2633895885″.21 billion

Domestic box office: 9 million

Opening weekend: 4 million

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(Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures)

4. “Black Panther” (2018)

Worldwide box office: id=”listicle-2633895885″.35 billion

Domestic box office: 0 million

Opening weekend: 2 million

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(Marvel Studios)

3. “Avengers: Age of Ultron” (2015)

Worldwide box office: id=”listicle-2633895885″.4 billion

Domestic box office: 9 million

Opening weekend: 1 million

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(Marvel Studios)

2. “The Avengers” (2012)

Worldwide box office: id=”listicle-2633895885″.5 billion

Domestic box office: 3 million

Opening weekend: 7 million

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(Disney)

1. “Avengers: Infinity War” (2018)

Worldwide box office: billion

Domestic box office: 8 million

Opening weekend: 8 million

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A brief history of US troops playing cards – and a magician’s trick honoring veterans

War can be hell…and war can be absolute boredom. There are few better ways to pass the time than by playing cards. Anyone who served in the military and made it past basic training probably ended up in a game of cards with their fellow troops.


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Photo taken by an 82d Airborne paratrooper during WWII. (Portraits of War)

They’re easy to carry: small and lightweight, they fit into a rucksack, duffel bag, or Alice pack without having to sacrifice any piece of essential gear. Plus, they’re cheap. It just makes sense that the troops and playing cards would pair so well together.

The Bicycle Playing Card Company recounts the history of American troops and playing cards, though many other nations’ militaries also have a tradition of playing cards in their downtime. It just beats sitting around thinking about everything that could go wrong in a battle. As one Civil War soldier said, “Card playing seemed to be as popular a way of killing time as any.”

Wartime decks have been used to help soldiers in the field learn about their enemies and allies, to identify aircraft, and even teach a little about American history. Even in the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, American forces used playing cards to identify the most wanted members of Saddam Hussein’s regime.

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These cards are probably well-known by now.

Also Read: This is how POWs got playing cards with secret escape maps for Christmas

Playing cards themselves can be traced back to 12th century China. Some scholars think they made their way to Europe through Italian traders. The cards (and maybe even the games) predate the United States. But Americans have their own love affair with cards, and the military is no different.

Early special decks were released depicting Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, and (John Quincy) Adams as the kings of the deck. By the time of the Civil War, playing cards were in every American camp, Union or Confederate.

Since troops in the Civil War spent a lot of time in camp and had easy access to decks, alcohol, and firearms, a cheater could make the game go very badly for himself. The war actually shaped the way playing cards are printed, so players could hold a tighter hand.

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Another innovation of that era was the design on the backs of cards. Before then, most were made with plain backs, ones that were easy to mark and see through. The new back designs made short work of that problem.

In 1898, the Consolidated Playing Card Company created a cheap deck and poker chips for troops deploying to the Spanish-American War. For World War I, the U.S. Playing Card Company released special decks just for a few specialties of service in the Great War, namely Artillery, Navy, Air Corps, and Tank Corps. The German High Command in WWI considered the game so important to morale, they called the cards kartonnen wapens – cardboard weapons.

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German soldiers playing cards on the Western front in the summer of 1916. (Playing Card Museum)

Many playing card factories converted to war production during World War II, but that certainly didn’t mean no decks were printed. The aforementioned cards used to identify aircraft, known as “spotter cards,” were essential to the war effort.

During the Vietnam War, playing card companies sent deployed soldiers and Marines special decks comprised of just the ace of spades, believing the Viet Cong considered the symbol to be a deadly serious omen.

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As late as 2007, American forces were given decks meant to inform them about important cultural and historical relics in the countries to which they deployed.

Watch below as magician Justin Flom recounts the oft-told story of a Revolutionary War soldier and his deck of cards, which acts as his bible, calendar, and almanac. Be sure to watch til the end for a magician’s tribute to American troops overseas.

Humor

7 reasons why ‘Top Gun’ made you want to become a fighter pilot

The 1980s brought us some fantastic action movies like “Lethal Weapon” and “Die Hard,” which made movie-goers consider joining the police force.


When Tony Scott’s “Top Gun” landed in cinemas across the nation, it was an instant blockbuster, earning over 350 million worldwide according to box office mojo.

With the adrenaline-packed scenes the film offers, “Top Gun” audience members of all ages wanted to be the next Maverick.

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Jester’s dead! (Paramount)

Also Read: 5 heroic movie acts a military officer would never do

So check out these reasons why the average Joe would want to be the next great “Top Gun” fighter pilot.

1. Getting a kick-ass callsign

Face it — Maverick and Goose are pretty epic names — but be as original as possible if you get to pick yours.

2. Keeping up with foreign relations

Rarely do allied forces get close to their enemy on the battlefield, but to be inverted while sitting in a cockpit whilst flashing the grand FU gesture — that’s badass.

3. Attracting a hottie

There are many ways to pick up women at a squid bar. If you ever had an issue getting the girl as a civilian, we’ve got a solution: throw on that uniform.

Lady pilots, this works for you, too — just make sure you find a man who can appreciate a strong woman.

Oh, and don’t forget your wingman.

4. Wear aviator sunglasses

Nothing says “I am awesome” like putting on a blacked-out pair of aviators. This look never gets old.

5. Play shirtless volleyball

With arguably no real reason to be in the movie story-wise, the producers had some of Hollywood’s brightest stars in their film at the time and they took advantage.

It’s safe to say that no man, after watching Top Gun, doesn’t think about this scene while playing the popular beach sport.

6. Aerial Dogfighting

This is where the real ass kicking takes place. Naval aviators are some of the world’s best at aerial maneuvering to take down the enemy. All jokes aside, the dogfighting scenes are where the real motivation to be a fighter pilot begins.

Related: 7 kids who joined (even commanded) military units for a day

7. The theme song

We dare you to listen to this without getting amped or googling “how to become a fighter pilot”.

Can you think of any other? Comment below and let us know what your call-sign would be.
MIGHTY MOVIES

Interview with ‘Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation’ with former Special Agent Luis Elizondo


In December of 2017, The New York Times published a stunning front-page exposé about the Pentagon’s mysterious UFO program, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP). Featuring an interview with a former military intelligence official and Special Agent In-Charge, Luis Elizondo, who confirmed the existence of the hidden government program, the controversial story was the focus of worldwide attention.


Previously run by Elizondo, AATIP was created to research and investigate Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) including numerous videos of reported encounters, three of which were released to a shocked public in 2017. Elizondo resigned after expressing to the government that these UAPs could pose a major threat to our national security, and not enough was being done to deal with them or address our potential vulnerabilities.

Now, as a part of HISTORY’s groundbreaking new six-part, one-hour limited series “Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation,” Elizondo is speaking out for the first time with Tom DeLonge, co-founder and President of To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science, and Chris Mellon, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense and Intelligence, to expose a series of startling encounters and embark on fascinating new investigations that will urge the public to ask questions and look for answers. From A+E Originals, DeLonge serves as executive producer.

In collaboration with We Are The Mighty and HISTORY, I had the opportunity to sit down with this warrior for an interview.

Series premieres Friday, May 31, at 10/9c on HISTORY.

Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation | Premieres Friday May 31st 10/9c | HISTORY

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Luis Elizondo – Director of Global Security & Special Programs

Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Elizondo conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East.

Most recently, Elizondo managed the security for certain sensitive portfolios for the U.S. Government as the Director for the National Programs Special Management Staff. For nearly the last decade, Elizondo also ran a sensitive aerospace threat identification program focusing on unidentified aerial technologies. Elizondo’s academic background includes Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology, with research experience in tropical diseases.

Elizondo is also an inventor who holds several patents.

Secretive program tracked UFOs for 5 years

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What was it like operating under high levels of secrecy regarding AATIP?

I think in my position as a career intelligence officer in the department of defense, I am used to working discreetly on programs of a national security nature. I think the very role of intelligence tends to be secretive, obviously for the purposes of Operational Security (OPSEC), you don’t want to inadvertently compromise your activities or efforts and have those fall into the hands of a foreign adversary. You know, it was just another day at the office.

UFO spotted by US fighter jet pilots, new footage reveals – BBC News

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Has AATIP found any man-made threats?

Well, what I think AATIP was successful in identifying signatures and performance characteristics that go beyond the typical profile of adversarial type technologies. I know from that perspective AATIP was very helpful because you’re looking at performance characteristics including; extreme acceleration, hypersonic velocities, low observability, multi-median or trans-median travel and, frankly, positive hits without any type of propulsion or flight surfaces or wings.

Put that into context of what you’re observing electro-optically on radar and what’s being reported by the military eyewitnesses. I think you have to pause for a minute and scratch your head thinking ‘you’re not looking at a conventional technology.’

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A+E Network

What kind of repercussions are there with providing the public with this type of information?

Well, I can’t answer on behalf of the government. Obviously, there are some individuals that remained in the department that may not appreciate what I did or how I did it. At the end of the day, if the information is unclassified and is of potential national security concern, I think the public has a right to know. Keep in mind that at no point in time were [any] sources or methods compromised, vocational data or any other type of data, [that] we try to keep out of the hands of foreign adversaries.

Keep in mind, had the system worked [from] the beginning I wouldn’t have had to resign. I resigned out of a sense of loyalty and duty to the department of defense. I tried to work within the system to inform my boss, General Mattis at the time. This is the man who was the secretary of defense, and my experience with him in combat was he was a man who wants more information, not less. We didn’t have the ability to report certain information or aspects of AATIP up the chain of command to the boss — that was a problem.

Sometimes if you want to fix something, you have to go outside of the system to fix it. That’s my perspective anyway.

Let’s not forget that secretary Mattis did almost the exact same thing almost a year later, he had to resign for reasons that he thought were important to him.

UFO spotted by US fighter jet pilots, new footage reveals – BBC News

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Project Blue Book insisted that UFOs were not a threat to national security, however, decades later your findings tell otherwise. What is responsible for this shift?

Do I think they’re a threat? They could be if they wanted to be.

Let me give you a very succinct analogy: Let’s say at night you go to lock your front door, you don’t expect any problems, but you lock it anyways just to be extra safe. You lock your windows, and you turn on your alarm system, and you go to bed. You do this every morning, and let’s say one morning after you wake up, you’re walking downstairs, and you find muddy footprints in your living room.

Nothing has been taken, no one is hurt, but despite you locking the front doors, the windows, and turning on the alarm system — there are muddy footprints in your living room. The question is: is that a threat?

Well, I don’t know, but it could be if it wanted to be.

For that reason, it’s imperative from a national security perspective that we better understand what it is we’re seeing.

My job at AATIP was very simple: [identify] what it is and how it works, not to determine who is behind the wheel or where they’re from or what their intentions are. What I’m saying is that other people who are smarter than me should figure out those answers.

To me, a threat is a threat, until I know something isn’t a threat, in the Department of Defense, we have to assume it is a threat. The primary function of the Department of Defense is to fight and win wars, we’re not police officers, we don’t go to places to protect and serve. I hate to say it but our job is to kill as many bad guys as possible, so from that perspective, if this was not potentially a threat it would be something someone else should look at — There are different agencies out there such as Health and Human Services, DHS, FAA, and State Department.

This is something that is flying in our skies with impunity. It has the ability to fly over our combat air space and control overall combat theaters, potentially over all of our cities and there is not much we can do about it.

I have to assume it’s a threat.

Keeping in mind that if a Russian or Chinese aircraft entered out airspace the first thing we’d do is scramble F-22s and go intercept it and it would be front page on CNN. [These things, however,] because they don’t have tail numbers, insignia on their wings or tails — they don’t even have wings or tails [at all], it’s crickets. This is occurring, and no one wants to have a conversation about it. That, to me is a greater threat than the threat itself because we can’t allow ourselves [to talk about it] despite the mounting evidence that is there.

Is there anything the public can do to put pressure on our leaders to have a more appropriate response?

First of all, in defense of the Department of Defense, people like to blame DoD “oh, these guys said it was weather balloons or swamp gas” but the reason why there is a stigma is because we made it an issue and made it taboo as American citizens and therefore the Department of Defense is simply responding to the stigma we placed on it. The DoD, for many years, wanted to look at this but the social stigma and taboo, put a lot of pressure on the DoD not to report these things. It’s a shame because of a laundry list of secondary, tertiary issues that ensue if you ignore a potential problem.

I think DoD, in defense of our national security apparatus, nobody wanted to own this portfolio because it was fraught with so much stigma. million of taxpayer dollars were used to support this and it’s problematic because how do you, as a DoD official, go to your boss and say “there’s something in our skies, we don’t know what it is, we don’t know how it works, and by the way, there is not a damned thing we can do about it.” That’s not a conversation that’s easy to have.

Now imagine having that conversation with a man named “Mad Dog Mattis.”

You want to have answers.

In this particular case, we didn’t have enough data. We need more data.

The only way you’re going to get more data is by letting the Department of Defense and Congress know that the American people support this endeavor. The reason they’re not going to respond to it is if they’re [only] getting calls from their constituents saying “what are you doing wasting my taxpayer money?”

I think that once the American people decide this is an issue that should be a priority, then I think the national security apparatus would respond accordingly.

Do you have any advice for service members that may witness strange events? How would you advise them to come forward?

I would advise them [by] letting them know that there are efforts underway in looking at this and they should report this. The Navy and the Air Force are changing their policies to be able to report this information to a cognoscente authority without the fear of repercussions.

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A+E Network

What could the readers of We Are The Mighty expect from your work in the future?

The truth.

That’s it, the truth.

By the way, there are areas which are classified, and I can’t talk about, but I only say that to you off caveat. I don’t like to speculate, I prefer to just keep it to the facts. As a former special agent, for me, it’s always just about the facts. Let’s collect as much data as we can and let the American people decide what this information means to them.

Series premieres Friday, May 31, at 10/9c on HISTORY.