Exclusive interview: Russo brothers on funny men, fatherhood, and Life After Marvel - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

Exclusive interview: Russo brothers on funny men, fatherhood, and Life After Marvel

“When I was behind on an episode of ‘WandaVision,’ my 14-year-old was mad at me.”

Are men hilarious? Or are men tragic? If you’ve watched something directed by Anthony and Joe Russo in the past two decades, the answer to that question will be both. From Arrested Development to Community to the Marvel films The Winter Solider, Civil War, Infinity War, and Endgame, the Russo Brothers have not only directed funny fictional men, but they’ve also, helped those same fictional men seem tragic. Say what you will about the perceived bombast or dominant market share of the Avengers and their Marvel pals, but part of the reason the MCU is so big is that we simultaneously believe in the quirkiness of Thor and the jerkiness of Iron Man.

Recently, the Russo Brothers have walked away from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, seemingly never to return. Were they consulted on WandaVision or any other future Marvel project, including The Falcon and the Winter Soldier? “No. I mean look, we had a seven-year process from Winter Soldier to Endgame where we were nonstop telling Marvel stories,” Anthony Russo says. “That was a very focused run for us. And it was among the most amazing experiences of our lives doing that, telling those stories. But it was also hard and immersive and a long run. And I think part of the catharsis of making Endgame for Joe and I was the fact that we didn’t have to carry the story forward beyond Endgame.”

But will they return? “I mean, we may do something with Marvel, again, some time,” he says. “Who knows? But, our, our process was to, pass the baton and step away.”

Back in 2019, the Russos described the theme of Avengers: Endgame as “the cost of being a hero.” Seen from a certain point of view, Cherry is similar, albeit not about superheroes, but instead, about real person, adrift in a drug crisis that Joe Russo points out have “gone fairly unchecked” in the US.

“[Cherry is] a movie about cost. And it’s about the cost of the choices that we make in the modern age,” Joe Russo explains. “There are many complicated issues that surround us as human beings in the modern age from technology to drugs. This is a drug era that is unlike any other drug era. It doesn’t have the romanticism of the hippie vibe culture of the late ’60s and early ’70s with mushrooms and marijuana and psychedelics. These are drugs that are scientifically engineered to make you addicted. And in addicting they can most likely kill you. So there’s a fatalism to this capitalistic endeavor of making these drugs.”

As a recent New Yorker piece pointed out, the profit made by unscrupulous corporations is astounding, with the wealthy Sackler family being one of the biggest profiteers of opioids. “The government is acutely aware of this and doctors are acutely aware of it, yet it still gets prescribed,” Joe Russo says. “And prescribed in ridiculous and copious amounts. And people recovering from surgery who are never the same again. ”

“I think it’s slightly more complex than, what we’re doing with the Marvel characters,” Anthony says. “I don’t know that he’s a hero per se so much as he is a, is an individual who, as a kid who makes one or two decisions that he doesn’t have a life experience to make and that costs him 15 years of his life.”

After providing escapism across four of the greatest Marvel films, and making us laugh for a decade before that, the Russo Brothers are coming back down to Earth and facing reality. That said, they’re still involved with the impending live-action remake of the animated Disney movie Hercules. What will their version be like? The Emma Watson Beauty and the Beast? The recent live-action Lion King?

“Our approach certainly would be to do something more in the category of the male characters who lack self-awareness,” Joe Russo says with a laugh. “We’re trying to find humor, in that version of Hercules. Something inspired by that film and that brings some of old with it along and bringing something new to it as well.”

Anthony has a 14-year-old daughter who is “WandaVision obsessed.” For a while, he was behind an episode. “She was mad at me,” he says. “But my ten-year-old son loves cooking and he’s obsessed with Gordon Ramsey.”

“We just finished watching Your Honor,” Joe Russo says. “But my kids are older, so you can watch thrillers with them. It’s fun.”

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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Watch the trailer for Netflix’s WWII docu-series ‘Five Came Back’

Netflix partnered up with huge modern directors to tell the story of five filmmakers who chose to put their careers on hold and serve in World War II.


Based on Mark Harris’ best-selling book, “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War,” the new Netflix series “Five Came Back” is about five filmmakers (John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens) who served in the war, then returned to share what they learned with the world through their art.

With interviews by Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Guillermo del Toro, Lawrence Kasdan, and Paul Greengrass, and narrated by Meryl Streep, “Five Came Back” explores the role filmmakers have during tumultuous times.

“Americans did not realize the extent of the threat Hitler posed,” narrates Streep.

The “five” created films that brought the reality of the war to the American people, and, in doing so, “changed the world.”

Related: 5 Hollywood directors who served and filmed real wars

Watch the trailer below and get excited — “Five Came Back” comes to Netflix on March 31.

MIGHTY MOVIES

How playing the role of a SEAL Team 6 operator changed this actor’s life

When actor Kyle Schmid landed a role playing one of America’s most elite commandos in the HISTORY drama “SIX,” he knew critics would be looking for every flaw in his portrayal — no matter how small.


Seriously? It was the elite operators from SEAL Team 6 that executed the daring raid that killed terror mastermind Osama bin Laden. And a Canadian-born actor who’d never played a role like this was supposed to pull off a convincing performance of one of the world’s best warriors?

 

Exclusive interview: Russo brothers on funny men, fatherhood, and Life After Marvel
(Photo courtesy of HISTORY)

 

It was a daunting task, but one Schmid took very seriously.

“The entire reason we did this show, and why we all wanted to do it so badly, is we wanted to do something that had integrity at the end of the day,” Schmid said in an exclusive interview with We Are The Mighty. “It’s incredibly important to get all those little things right.”

“We’ll be under the microscope of anyone that’s been in the military who served and is going to pick out the little things that we do wrong — that’s just going to happen,” he added. “But we tried our damnedest to do everything right as we possibly could; we spent a lot of time and energy doing that.”

“SIX” is a new drama series produced by the HISTORY cable channel that takes a deep look into what it’s like to be a member of one of the world’s most elite military units. The show goes well beyond a shoot-em-up (though there’s plenty of door kicking and explosive entries to satisfy any action junky) and explores the toll the high OPTEMPO job of a DevGru operator takes on personal relationships.

What’s more, “SIX” tackles some of the ethical issues these commandos face on each and every mission, and explores how the elite team members deal with lapses of judgement and tactics among themselves.

 

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Schmid plays SEAL Team 6 operator Alex Caulder, a seemingly free-spirit sailor who’d rather be chasing skirts and riding tubes than jumping out of airplanes and shooting bad guys. But under the hedonistic exterior, the unit’s “point man” is warrior philosopher, acting as his team’s conscience when ops go bad.

“I’ve always been a morally driven and ethical person as a human being,” Schmid said, adding he used the help of military consultants and his own personality to “get in Caulder’s head.”

“It’s all about the choices you make in your life and whether you’re able to stand behind them with the integrity that you want to,” Schmid said.

“There’s a joke the guys were saying on set: ‘You’re too Caulder for Caulder,’ ” Schmid added.

Exclusive interview: Russo brothers on funny men, fatherhood, and Life After Marvel

Schmid rocks the MP7 like he was born with one in his hand. (Photo courtesy HISTORY)

But Caulder is more than a thinker — he’s one of the SEAL team‘s best assaulters, flowing through rooms and popping up on tangos like he was born to it. And it’s no accident that the action looks so good on the screen.

Working with tactical trainer and former SEAL Mitch Hall of Trident Focus, the actors on “SIX” spent two weeks learning how to shoot and move like real-world operators.

Schmid recalled that in one of the fight scenes in the first episode, “as point man, I’m pieing these corners and I’ve got my feet wrong and I’m still trying to gauge the depth with my MP7 around the corner so I’m not sticking my head out and getting it blown off and I asked Mitch, ‘let’s do it again to get it right.’ “

It was an intensive course that Schmid took seriously, even taking days off to work at the range and practice his tactics. And when the filming was done for HISTORY’s “SIX,” the actor emerged a changed man.

“This [role] really allowed me to look at life from a different perspective. I learned to turn down my dial — to realize what was important and what was worth worrying about,” Schmid says. “On the other side … I’m much more aware of my surroundings, constantly living in the ‘yellow’ — and I gotta tell you, it’s a pretty good way to be living.”

Two seasons of HISTORY’s “SIX” is available to watch on Hulu

 

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This is the rifle Vasily Zaytsev used to wage a one-man war in ‘Enemy at the Gates’

First used by the Russians in 1891, the Mosin-Nagant was modified from a standard service weapon to a sniper rifle in the 1930s. This five-shot, bolt-action rifle was a highly effective killing tool on the battlefield because of its sturdy construction and accuracy.


The Mosin-Nagant rifle typically weighs in at 8.8 pounds and has a muzzle velocity of nearly 3,000 feet per second — but the rifle is only as good as the man or woman who pulls its trigger.

During the Battle of Stalingrad, talented Russians snipers used the Mosin-Nagant PU version to wreak plenty of havoc against their Nazi adversaries. One of those talented sharpshooters was none other than the Soviet hero himself, Vasily Zaytsev.

Related: The 6 best Hollywood sniper shots ever

Zaytsev’s remarkable story was brought to life in 2001’s feature film “Enemy at the  Gates” starring Jude Law.  As a young boy, he learned his expert marksmanship skills while hunting game and tracking wolves near his home in desolate Siberia.

In 1937, Zaytsev was recruited into the Red Army, volunteered to be transferred to the front lines and waged a one-man war against the Nazis and reportedly killed 250 enemy troops with his Mosin-Nagant.

Exclusive interview: Russo brothers on funny men, fatherhood, and Life After Marvel
The Hero of the Soviet Union Vasily Zaitsev (left)

Reportedly, Zaitsev was involved in a historical sniper duel with Maj. Konig, the former head of the German Army’s sniper school. During an afternoon of stalking one another, Zaitsev scored a righteous kill shot eliminating the German sniper from the war — using his famous Mosin-Nagant.

Roughly, 17 million Mosin–Nagant were produced during War World II, and its devastating 7.62 x 54R round is still used today in several Russian-made weapons.

Also Read: These 4 guns were used to make the longest sniper kills in history

Check out Lightning War 1941’s video to see this effective sniper rifle in action for yourself.

YouTube, LightningWar1941

MIGHTY MOVIES

Bill Burr, Jeff Ross, and Eagles of Death Metal rock out at Hollywood American Legion

In the first-ever Stand Up and Rock Out benefit event, American Legion Post 43 in Hollywood, California, got a heavy dose of comedy and heavy metal; attracting celebs, rockers, and plenty of vets. Held in the new, beautifully remodeled theater at The Legion, the sold-out event featured sets from Bill Burr, Jeff Ross, and Bob Saget and a performance by Eagles of Death Metal.


Rounding out the show was Joe Derosa with American Legion member Jon Stites hosting the whole event.

Jon is no stranger to comedy, having made the rounds all over LA and abroad. Before becoming a professional standup comedian, Jon was a grunt in the Army and even spent a little time as a college language professor. Now, he helps the iconic Hollywood American Legion get the street cred it deserves by bringing them acts like Bill Burr and Eagles of Death Metal. Check out the video above for a taste of the epic jam session and stay tuned for news about more rock shows coming to a Legion near you.

If you want to check out more Jon Stites, catch Mandatory Fun, where he breaks down the most hilarious clips from across the military.

MIGHTY MOVIES

6 of the best Marine recruiting commercials ranked

Marine recruiters talk a good game to get prospects to sign on the dotted line, but words can only carry so much motivation. For some, it’s visual representation that can genuinely inspire a young adult to sign a contract and serve in the Corps.


Although posters are pretty cool, epic commercials that put adventure and self-righteousness on display are better.

Related: 6 ‘Toys for Tots’ commercials we swear didn’t make us cry

So, check out six of the best Marine recruiting commercials.

1. “Battles Won”

This commercial uses incredible voice-over and even cooler animation to cover the Corps’ rich, inspiring history.

(Marine OCS Blog | YouTube)

2. “Battle Up: 30”

One of the great recruiting commercials highlights the transformation of driven, young women into the ultimate Marine. Katy Perry may have intended to make her music video Part of Me feel like this motivating video, but she fell short.

(Marine Corps Recruiting | YouTube)

3. “241 Years of Battles Won”

If this video doesn’t get you to want to sign up, we don’t know what freakin’ will. The epic advertisement showcases how the Marine Corps embodies the saying, “the few and the proud.”

(Marine OCS Blog | YouTube)

4. “Rite of Passage”

Released in the late 1980s, this commercial showcases the Corps’ fighting spirit. The video symbolizes how troops will be trained to eliminate any threat that challenges their nation’s existence, even if that threat is a giant, flaming monster.

(echonow2001 | YouTube)

5. “The Climb”

Being a Marine means you’re going to face unbelievable mental and physical obstacles, but it’s how you overcome them that separates you from the rest of the population.

Marines pride themselves on finishing the mission using teamwork, and that’s what makes this commercial outstanding.

(Marine1763 | YouTube)

Also Read: This is why some Marines wear the ‘French Fourragere,’ and some don’t

6. “Knight”

Taking a page out of the Legend of King Arthur, the Marines’ 1987 commercial invokes medieval knights to tell young men that if they become a part of the Corps, they would be seen as one of the greatest warriors who ever lived.

Now, who wants to sign up?

(Marines | YouTube)Do you agree with our list? Comment below and rank these videos yourself!

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ post-credits scene will make olds very happy

After finishing off Avengers: Endgame with a definitive and decidedly sweet ending, the next big Marvel movie — Spider-Man: Far From Home — will return to Marvel’s diabolic plans to get you to sit through the credits for extra scenes. Are there post-credits scenes for Spider-Man: Far From Home and do that matter? The answer is a big yes.

No spoilers ahead.

It’s hard to know which of these facts feels more surreal:


  1. Tom Holland has been in five Marvel movies as Spider-Man at this point
  2. It’s only been five years since Andrew Garfield was in his second Spider-Man movie; which also starred Jamie Foxx getting bitten by electric eels.
  3. 2019 marks twelve years since Tobey Maguire did his emo-Spider-Man dance routine in Spider-Man 3.

Feeling old yet? If so, there’s some very good news about Spider-Man: Far From Home. The post-credits scene is basically made for olds. If you remember seeing the first Tobey Maguire Spidey-flick like the same year you were able to legally buy alcohol for the first time (or maybe even before) then this post-credits scene is for you.

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME – Official Trailer

www.youtube.com

We aren’t going to spoil what it is exactly yet, but let’s just put it this way: There are two post-credits scenes for Spider-Man: Far From Home, and the first one is the one you’ve got to see. Technically, this is what the pros call a “mid-credits” scene because it happens pretty quickly after the movie “ends.” (These movies never end.)

Will this scene make everyone happy? Yes. Does it set-up great things for the next big phase of Marvel movies. Big yes.

So, word of warning, between now and July 2, 2019, avoid spoilers as much as you can. This might not as Endgame-level as some thought, but if you’re of a certain age, it’s going to be very, very cool.

Spider-Man: Far From Home is out in theaters on July 2, 2019, which is, friendly reminder, a freaking Tuesday.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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The real defenders of Benghazi want you to know “13 Hours” is the truth

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(Paramount Pictures)


We Are The Mighty recently had the opportunity to sit down with the principals behind “13 Hours” and chat with them about the film, including their sense of how accurate it is. And while the past three years have been full of rumor and innuendo around what happened that fateful night in 2012 in Benghazi, the CIA security contractors who rescued the the Americans and defended the annex want the world to know what’s in the movie “13 Hours” is what really happened on the ground.

Watch:

Director Michael Bay has always been more than a vocal supporter of the military. No matter what his detractors might say, on his film sets, he always makes a concerted effort to get the reality of modern-day U.S. military personnel right. He believes this might be his most realistic movie ever.

Watch:

The film stars John Krasinski as Jack Silva, a CIA contractor and former Navy SEAL who joins a security team already based in Benghazi.

Watch:

Other members of the team include James Badge Dale (“Rone”), Pablo Schreiber (“Tanto”), David Denman (“Boon”), Max Martini (“Oz”), and Dominic Fumusa (“Tig”). To a man, each one told We Are The Mighty how important the realism of the movie was to their performance.

Dale, who has portrayed military personnel before in HBO’s World War II epic miniseries The Pacific, found his preparation for this film different than anything he’s done before. (This time he’s also portraying a former Navy SEAL.)

Watch:

Pablo Schreiber and David Denman play a Marine veteran and Army Ranger veteran who assist with the rescue. Their experiences getting to know the real operators they play onscreen gave them a deep appreciation of the men and what happened there.

Watch:

Max Martini and Dominic Fumusa trained with former Navy SEALs and contractors throughout the filming of the movie. The real defenders of Benghazi watched them as they brought the events of that day back to life.

Watch:

13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi is in theaters Friday. Follow the film on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Articles

8 famous people who served on D-Day

On June 6, 1944, the Allies embarked on the crucial invasion of Normandy on the northern coast of France. Allied forces suffered major casualties, but the ensuing campaign ultimately dislodged German forces from France.


Did you know these eight famous individuals participated in the D-Day invasion?

James Doohan

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James Doohan | Golden Pacific Media, YouTube

Actor James Doohan is beloved among Trekkies for his portrayal of chief engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott in “Star Trek.”

Years before he donned the Starfleet uniform, Doohan joined the Royal Canadian Artillery during WWII. During the Normandy invasion, he stormed Juno Beach and took out two snipers before he was struck by six bullets from a machine gun, according to website Today I Found Out. He lost part of a finger, but the silver cigarette case in his pocket stopped a bullet from piercing his heart.

David Niven

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David Niven | Oscars, Youtube

Academy Award-winning British thespian David Niven became a lieutenant-colonel of the British Commandos during the Second World War. In the D-Day invasion, he commanded the Phantom Signals Unit, according to the New York Post. This unit was responsible for keeping rear commanders informed on enemy positions.

After the war, he declined to speak much about his military experience.

Yogi Berra

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Yogi Berra | Getty Photos / Al Bello

Famed baseball catcher Yogi Berra helped to storm Normandy by manning a Naval support craft. The vessel fired rockets at enemy positions on Omaha Beach.

The New York Post reports that Seaman Second Class Berra manned a machine gun during the battle.

Medgar Evers

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Medgar Evers | YouTube

In 1963, activist Medgar Evers was assassinated due to his efforts to promote civil rights for African Americans. Decades earlier, Evers served in the 325th Port Company during WWII, eventually rising to the rank of sergeant. This segregated unit of black soldiers delivered supplies during the Normandy invasion, according to the NAACP.

J.D. Salinger

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J.D. Salinger | Wikimedia Commons

“The Catcher in the Rye” author J.D. Salinger belonged to a unit that invaded Utah Beach on D-Day. According to Vanity Fair, Salinger carried several chapters of his magnum opus with him when he stormed the shores of France.

John Ford

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John Ford | Allan Warren | Wikimedia Commons

Director John Ford, famous for Westerns like “Stagecoach” and “The Searchers,” also went ashore with the D-Day invasion.

As a commander in the US Naval Reserve, Ford led a team of US Coast Guard cameramen in filming a documentary on D-Day for the Navy.

His film on the Normandy invasion ultimately saw a very limited release to the public, due to the amount of Allied casualties. Much of the D-Day footage has since disappeared, according to the Los Angeles Times. 

Henry Fonda

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Henry Fonda | National Museum of the United States Navy | Flickr

According to “WWII: The Book of Lists” by Chris Martin, American actor Henry Fonda served as a quartermaster on the destroyer USS Satterlee, which provided support to the Allies during the Normandy invasion. Years later, he played a part in the war epic “The Longest Day,” which focused on the D-Day landings.

Alec Guinness

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Alec Guinness | Lucasfilm

“Star Wars” and “Bridge Over the River Kwai” star Alec Guinness served in Great Britain’s Royal Navy during WWII, according to the History Answers blog. StarWars.com reports that the Obi Wan actor served as an officer on a landing craft and transported British soldiers to the shores of Normandy on D-Day.

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These 6 military vehicles would make awesome Zords

Let’s face it, the Power Rangers have awesome superpowers, but they also have awesome gear, too. We’re talking about the Zords.


Now, granted, we’ve looked at how the military would take on Rita Repulsa and her minions.

That said, the military’s got gear that might give Zordon (played by Bryan Cranston) some inspiration.

1. M1A2 Abrams tank

This is one tough vehicle. In “Armored Cav,” Tom Clancy related the tale of how one Abrams tank survived being hit multiple times by T-72 main gun rounds from as close as 400 yards!

The Abrams also has superb firepower in the form of its 120mm main gun, a M2 .50-caliber machine gun, and two M240 7.62mm machine guns. In essence, this tank is already a Zord in many respects.

Might as well make it official.

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U.S. Soldiers with the 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, fire an M1A2 SEPv2 Abrams Main Battle Tank during exercise Combined Resolve VII at the 7th Army Training Command in Grafenwoehr, Germany, Aug. 18, 2016. (U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Markus Rauchenberger)

2. B-1B Lancer

This plane carries a lot of firepower – 84 Mk 82 500-pound bombs – and that is considering that its external weapons carriage was disabled as a result of the United States signing the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The plane is also fast, and capable of flying at treetop level.

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A B-1B Lancer drops cluster munitions. The B-1B uses radar and inertial navigation equipment enabling aircrews to globally navigate, update mission profiles and target coordinates in-flight, and precision bomb without the need for ground-based navigation aids. (U.S. Air Force photo)

3. A-10 Thunderbolt

There is no reason why the A-10 – and its ability to BRRRRRT the bad guys with the GAU-8 — shouldn’t be a Zord. It is very tough (remember how Kim Campbell brought back a busted-up A-10?). It also carries a lot of bombs.

Put it this way — even a skyscraper-sized minion of Rita’s would be hard-pressed to stand up against a squadron of baseline Warthogs, but against an A-10 Thunderbolt Zord?

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This stuff would give Rita Repulsa nightmares. (Photo: US Air Force Senior Airman Chris Drzazgowski)

4. M270 MLRS

This vehicle gets the nod for its firepower. The various rockets it fires can spread bomblets or a unitary charge. That ruins the day for infantry and enemy vehicles, but when it uses the MGM-140 ATACMS – or the Army Tactical Missile System – it could probably put the hurt on one of the skyscraper-sized monsters as well.

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Photo: Public Domain

5. M50 Ontos

This is more a blast from the past. That said, the six 106mm recoilless rifles provide a huge punch. The rifles could fire anti-personnel or anti-tank rounds.

In Vietnam, the Ontos was deadly against enemy infantry – and given that the fighting against Rita’s minions is likely to involve a lot of hand-to-hand fighting (until she calls in her big guns), the Ontos makes sense.

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6. M1097 Avenger

A lot of this has been focused on the air-to-ground aspect. But it never hurts to be ready for some ground-to-air action. DefenseNews.com notes that Boeing is proposing some upgrades to the baseline Avenger, notably the AIM-9X Sidewinder and the Longbow version of the AGM-114 Hellfire.

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M1097 Avenger (US Army photo)

Now, we have no idea what any Megazord from these vehicles would look like, but given their firepower – would they need a Megazord configuration? We doubt it. We’d also like to know, what military vehicles do you think Zordon should use as the basis for his next generation of Zords?

MIGHTY MOVIES

The Liberator hits Netflix on Veterans Day

Based off the book, “The Liberator: One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau,” written by Alex Kershaw and produced by A+E Studios for Netflix, is the story of Captain Felix Sparks (Bradley James) and the Thunderbirds’ incredible battle against the Axis Powers in Nazi controlled Europe. Using state of the art Trioscope Enhanced Hybrid Animation, the story is coming to life this Veterans Day, November 11, only on Netflix.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPebr-6x3s0feature=emb_logo
The Liberator | Teaser Trailer | Netflix

www.youtube.com

The Liberator | Teaser Trailer | Netflix

War movies have always been a bastion of innovation when it comes to experimental new styles and effects that, when successful, influence the film industry for years to come. Every tink, bang and boom draw us closer in an attempt to push the limits of movie magic. Between the rounds and dirt, the audience and characters, leave home behind to experience something greater than themselves.

Experimental visuals, cutting edge sound design and a strong narrative backed by a best selling book about a bad ass warrior?

Yeah, I’d watch that.

Trioscope Enhanced Hybrid Animation looks similar to the art style of Telltale Games used in The Walking Dead video game series. The Walking Dead Telltale series was cancelled due to behind the scenes changes but the audience demanded the series finished – and it was. Unprecedented proof that a strong story and this captivating style choice is enough to keep fans demanding for more.

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GLENN ASAKAWA Getty Images

Felix Laurence Sparks

Felix Sparks was born on August 2, 1917 in San Antonio, Texas, and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1935. His leadership would guide him and the 157th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, through a literal odyssey across Nazi controlled Europe from Sicily to stepping through the threshold of the Dachau concentration camp.

There are no words for Dachau, and even the pictures of its horrors are pale beside its realities. Veterans of six campaigns to whom death was commonplace, sickened and vomited at Dachau. Not the sight and smell of death did this, but the decaying evidence of human cruelty that was beyond the understanding of the normal mind. Dachau was rot and stench and filth. Dachau was Hitler and the SS. And, deny it though its people did with every breath, Dachau was Germany of 1933-45. Let Dachau live in our memories. – Personal account by Felix L. Sparks Brigadier General, AUS(Retired)

Captain Felix Sparks is played by Bradley James whom you may recognize as Giuliano de’ Medici in another of Netflix’s powerhouse TV series Medici: The Magnificent. His portrayal of Captain Sparks stays true to the book. Historical accuracy has always been important to our warrior community and Bradley’s performance lands it.

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US Army

45th Infantry Division, Thunderbirds

When you hear about the 45th Infantry in WWII as a history buff you know you’re in for a wild ride. First of all, the Division’s symbol used to be the a Swastika before the war. It was an ancient Native American symbol and used to honor the population of the South Western United States. However, once the Swastika was affiliated with the Nazi Party, it was charged to the Thunderbird we know today.

Second of all, the battles. The 45th goes through it all, from being on the sidelines as a National Guard Unit in Oklahoma to kicking down the doors of the Reich in Germany. I will not mention them here as to not risk any spoilers but if you’re a history buff like me, you know which parts I’m looking forward to.

Lastly, this is definitely something to curl up with a MRE and a beer to watch on Netflix on Veterans Day. ‘Murica!

Your division is one of the best, if not the best division in the history of American arms.” – General George S. Patton
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A+E Studios

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MIGHTY MOVIES

A quick guide to every ‘Mandalorian’ character you should know

The newest “Star Wars” story has arrived on Disney Plus, and with it comes a whole new cast of interesting characters from around the galaxy. There is the unnamed title character, “The Mandalorian” himself, plus several others played by Carl Weathers, Werner Herzog, and more.

Keep reading for a list of all the major characters on “The Mandalorian” you should know. We’ll be updating this list with each new episode as new faces join the protagonist bounty hunter.

Warning: Spoilers ahead for “The Mandalorian” episode one.


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Pedro Pascal as the bounty hunter in “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney)

The main character in “The Mandalorian” is an unnamed bounty hunter.

Known simply as the Mandalorian, not much was revealed about this guy other than his prowess for fighting and connection to the warriors of the planet called Mandalore. The Mandalorian says he was a “foundling” once, but has now become part of the Mandalorian troop. So far this mystery man hasn’t shown his face.

We know underneath is the face of actor Pedro Pascal, best known for his role as Oberyn Martell on “Game of Thrones” and Netflix’s “Narcos.”

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Carl Weathers as Greef Carga on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

Greef Carga is the man who gets the Mandalorian bounty assignments.

Greef Carga is the name of the man who the Mandalorian delivers his bounty assets to. Carga pays the Mandalorian, and then gives him info about an off-the-books job with a new client who has deep pockets.

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Werner Herzog as the Client on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

The Client is a mysterious man who commissions the Mandalorian for a new bounty hunt.

Similar to the Mandalorian, very little information about the “Client” is given on the first episode.

We know he has access to the rare metal called Beskar, and he wears an Imperial insignia — which means he’s still loyal to the fallen Empire. This was made clear thanks to his Stormtrooper bodyguards, too.

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Omid Abtahi as Doctor Pershing on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

Doctor Pershing appears to be working with the Client to try and acquire the Yoda-like baby.

When the Mandalorian gets his new assignment from the Client, a man named Doctor Pershing appears. This doctor seems to greatly prefer that the “asset” (aka the little baby Yoda-like being) is acquired alive.

The Client tells the Mandalorian he’ll pay out half of the bounty fee if the asset is killed, as long as the bounty hunter can confirm its death.

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Nick Nolte is the voice of Kuill on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

Kuill is an Ugnaught (a type of alien species) who helps the Mandalorian.

The Mandalorian follows the Client’s information to a new planet, where he’s quickly attacked by two Blurrgs. Kuill saves the bounty hunter, and helps him get to the building where the asset is being held.

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Taika Waititi as IG-11 on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

IG-11 is a bounty droid who was also commissioned to find the Yoda-like baby.

The Mandalorian encounters the IG-11 droid (voiced by “Thor: Ragnorok” director Taika Waititi) when he arrives to the compound. Together they kill the guards, but the Mandalorian soon learns that this droid’s orders are to terminate the asset.

The Mandalorian “kills” IG-11 to protect the baby. It’s possible we’ll see IG-11 again, since he can theoretically be repaired and restored to working order.

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Gina Carano as Cara Dune on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

Cara Dune is another outcast fighter we’ll meet later on the show.

According to the official “Star Wars” website, Cara Dune is “a war veteran who survived the Galactic Civil War, but now lives as an outcast who finds it difficult to reintegrate into society.”

She’s a former rebel shock trooper and current mercenary who will eventually meet up with the Mandalorian, as seen in the first trailer.

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Giancarlo Esposito as Mof Gideon on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

Mof Gideon will be an antagonist character on “The Mandalorian.”

Played by “Breaking Bad” star Giancarlo Esposito, Mof Gideon is another Imperial loyalist.

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Natalia Tena on “The Mandalorian.”

(Disney/Lucasfilm)

We’ll also see a purple-skinned Twi’lek played by another ex-“Game of Thrones” actor.

Natalia Tena played Osha on HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” and also starred in the “Harry Potter” movies as Tonks. We haven’t yet met her alien character, but the coming episodes should reveal more soon.

“The Mandalorian” will premiere new episodes every Friday on Disney Plus.

This article originally appeared on Insider. Follow @thisisinsider on Twitter.

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MIGHTY MOVIES

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

It’s one of the coolest moments in medieval fantasy films. A blacksmith sweats over the forge, slowly pouring bright-orange, molten iron into an open-topped stone mold of a mighty sword while the audience watches a cool shot of the weapon taking shape.

Go ahead and toss in a shot of the warrior looking on with joy, let the audience watch as they quench the hot blade in snow, a person, or whatever, and presto, our hero has a neat toy for the next scene.

It’s too bad that this isn’t how any of it’s done in real life — and if it were, it’d be a sign of terrible craftsmanship.


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The switch to iron and steel meant that they could make weapons longer without sacrificing durability. Which is important when you’re trying to stab someone without getting stabbed.

(Picture by J.J. Luder)

First, it should be stated that there’s a huge difference between casting a weapon and forging one. Back in the Bronze Age, before blacksmiths knew any better, they would take molten bronze and pour it into a stone cast to create a battle-ready weapon. This is casting.

Bronze was made from mixing copper and tin. For blacksmiths in 1200 BCE, this wasn’t a problem as both were abundant enough. Mankind had known about iron for hundreds of years at this point, but using it required a tremendous effort to create a product that was on par with bronze alternatives. When it was discovered that just a bit of carbon could turn the Earth’s most abundant metal into steel, they embraced the challenge.

Steel makes for stronger, more durable weapons, so blacksmiths began using this metal instead, but the process required was much different. To create something, smiths needed to forge it, starting from a blank (or piece of metal) that was the relative size of the weapon they intended to make, heating it, and painstakingly hammering it into shape.

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(Universal Pictures)

No matter how cool of an opening scene this is, it’s still kinda of wrong.

It’s not impossible to cast iron weapons — but the process will yield a cheap, crude weapon. This works for the Uruk-hai Orcs of The Lord of the Rings, but it’s just not practical for anyone else. This is also how most cheapo swords that medieval fans have on their walls are made. For decorative weaponry, that’s fine, but the blade would probably snap in half given just a bit of pressure.

When you pour the metal into the cast, it’s going to take shape of the mold. Which means that it’s only going to be half made when it’s done with an open-top cast. The other half of the sword will be flat when the metal hardens. If they were to rework the metal into a complete shape after that, it’d defeat the purpose of the mold all together.

If you want a durable weapon made out of anything but bronze and looks beautiful, you’re going to need to forge it. This process can take days — even just to get a standard-looking sword. You’re looking at weeks of master craftsmanship to get the caliber of weapons used by main characters.

Most films opt to go with the more cinematic approach. Bright-red liquid (fun side note: Molten iron heated to the point where it can be cast is actually more of a pale yellow. They’re using aluminum) looks cool when it takes form, but the actual process of making real weapons is far more impressive — even if it takes a lot longer than a montage.

To see how it’s done, check out the video below!

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