Women's Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST) - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY SPORTS

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

The Air Force Academy women’s soccer team returns home to play the first of its final two home matches of the 2018 season when it plays host to Boise State, Friday, Oct. 12. The Falcons had their third straight 0-1-1 weekend, as they dropped another 0-1 match, this time to Colorado State. They followed that up with a 1-1 draw at Wyoming.

They’re looking to turn their luck around this Friday.


MIGHTY CULTURE

How Air Force-Navy rivalry is just as vicious as Army-Navy

The upcoming Army-Navy game is one that temporarily divides our usually-united U.S. military, if only for a few hours. The rivalry is 118 years old, is attended by sitting Presidents, and is older than the Air Force itself. But for the men who compete for the Commander-In-Chief’s Trophy, it can be even more daunting to head west and face the Air Force Academy Falcons.


There’s no way the Air Force will ever get as legendary a rivalry as the Army-Navy game. It’s one of the biggest games in sports. Even if it doesn’t change the rankings on any given year, it’s still got a huge fan base. The Air Force, despite being the better playing team for much of the past few decades, can’t compare to that kind of legacy.

What they can do, however, is spoil the parties at West Point and Annapolis.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Air Force’s 2014 starting QB Kale Pearson.

The trash talk

The Army-Navy game, while known for its mascot thefts and funny spirit videos, is also known for being overly polite. Not so at Navy-Air Force. Midshipmen hold a Falcon Roast pep rally during the week before the Air Force game, burning a wooden falcon in effigy.

“One thing I know about that game was there’s a lot more trash talk in Air Force-Navy than Army-Navy,” said Wyatt Middleton, a safety in the Navy class of 2011. Air Force even allowed the Navy side of the Commander-In-Chief’s trophy to tarnish in the two years the trophy was in Colorado Springs.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

A great game to watch

As for an interesting game, everyone knows the service academies aren’t playing for the BCS National Championship, so the winner doesn’t get more than bragging rights and the Commander-In-Chief’s Trophy. But for fans watching a game, scoring is important. No one wants to sit through a Navy 0-7 win over Army, even Midshipmen. Moreover, there’s no better ending to a game than a squeaker.

The average margin of victory in an Army-Navy Game over the last 15 years is almost 16 and a half points. For Air Force vs. Navy, that number drops to a two score game. And despite Army’s recent uptick in the quality of their game, Air Force and Navy always field much more impressive and more explosive teams.

Despite all of these facts, the Air Force Academy Falcons will never quite measure up to the ancient rivalry that is the Army-Navy Game. The Air Force-Navy game happens on the first Saturday in October, followed by the Army-Air Force game on the first Saturday in November.

The 2018 Army-Navy Game will be on Dec. 8, 2018 at noon Eastern, presented by USAA, and live from Philadelphia.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Usain Bolt stopped an interview for the US National Anthem

It seems like nothing can stop Usain Bolt, the world’s fastest man — except for respect. It would be easy to expect the most dominating runner to ever race across the Earth to be the kind of prima donna athlete that keeps us from wanting to meet our heroes.

Jamaican athlete Usain Bolt just isn’t that way.


Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Usain Bolt is a triple world-record holder, an 11-time world champion, an eight-time Olympic champion, and a four-time Laureus Sportsman of the Year. In 2017, at just 31 years old, he retired from the track after a short but illustrious career but can still be found having fun with the sport. At Super Bowl LIII in Atlanta, he casually tied the NFL record for the 40-yard dash while wearing sneakers and sweatpants.

He’s a guy who likes to have fun with the sport, but never enjoyed the intense training, interviews, or day-long photoshoots required of athletes of his stature. He does like the competition and the showmanship expected of a man who still owns the world record for the 100-meter, 200-meter, and 4×100-meter competition. He even has an infectious wry smile that often spreads to his competition.

But it looks like he takes sportsmanship seriously when it comes to respect for a national anthem, as shown when he stopped in the middle of an interview to stand for the ‘Star-Spangled Banner.’

In 2012, Bolt competed in the London Olympics to defend his record. He would ultimately take home three more gold medals from the event but what caught many people’s attention was an interview he did with Television Espanola. During the live interview, the U.S. National Anthem began playing in the stadium. Bolt asked if it was live but turned to face the music anyway, standing silently as the loudspeakers played the ‘Star-Spangled Banner.’

The reporter interviewing Bolt followed suit. As soon as the anthem was over, Bolt turned back to the reporter, respectfully apologized, and continued the interview.

Featured

From Annapolis to Miami: Navy midshipman drafted by the Dolphins

Last night, the Miami Dolphins drafted one of the most dynamic players to ever take the field for the United States Naval Academy. If you have seen Malcolm Perry play, it should be no surprise that he is being given a chance to play in the NFL.


From Annapolis to Miami! Malcolm Perry selected by the @MiamiDolphins. #NavyFB | #BuiltDifferentpic.twitter.com/pkrOIOUwD2

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From Annapolis to Miami! Malcolm Perry selected by the Miami Dolphins!

The Navy quarterback is being drafted as a wide receiver as Dolphin scouts were deeply impressed with Perry’s athleticism which was on full display at the Senior Bowl and NFL Combine. Perry was only the second midshipman to be ever invited to the Combine and showed off his versatility as both a passer and receiver. Listed at 5’9″ and weighing 186 pounds, Perry ran a 4.63 in the 40-yard dash.

As Navy football fans probably know, Perry switched back and forth from quarterback and slot back while at the Naval Academy. The Dolphins hope that he will be able to develop into a route runner and be used in the slot. His senior year, he set numerous Naval Academy records as he led Navy’s triple option offense to an 11-2 record and another win over Army. Perry rushed for over 2,000 yards and scored 21 rushing touchdowns while also throwing for seven.

Malcolm Perry 2019 Navy Highlights

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Malcolm Perry 2019 Navy Highlights

For those of you wondering about his service commitment, the rules are different than what they used to be. Defense Secretary Donald Esper announced in November 2019 that service academy cadets and midshipmen could either defer their military service or pay pack the cost of tuition if they were drafted in a professional sports draft.

Perry comes from a military family. Both his parents served in the 101st Airborne division and are Gulf War veterans. Perry grew up an Army brat and always thought about enlisting but never gave thought to going to a service academy, especially the one in Annapolis.

“Growing up, I thought being in the military was the coolest thing,” he said. “I just always figured I would enlist, though I didn’t know much about the academies themselves.” But Perry’s athleticism in high school bought him the attention of both the Navy and Air Force Academies and he ended up going Navy.

ESPN had cameras in Perry’s house (as with most notable draft prospects) because of the virtual nature of the 2020 NFL Draft due to the coronavirus outbreak. It is awesome they did because, we can see Perry and his family’s reaction to him being taken. Those Army parents look really nice in Navy gear, don’t they?

Here it is! Congrats #malcolmperry and family – and @MiamiDolphins!!pic.twitter.com/QzKRYssuUp

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MIGHTY SPORTS

Women’s Volleyball — San Diego State at Air Force (9/23/18 – 3:00 PM EST)

Following an impressive 10-win non-conference season, the Air Force volleyball team turns to the Mountain West portion of the calendar this weekend, when it hosts San Diego State on Sunday, Sept. 23. The Falcons, who collected their most non-conference victories in 15 years over the last four weeks, will host the Aztecs at 1:00 p.m., inside Cadet East Gym.


San Diego State, which went 1-11 during non-conference action, will open the Mountain West season on Friday night, as it hosts Fresno State at Peterson Gym before traveling to the Academy. Deja Harris currently leads the Aztecs in kills (3.32 kps) and blocks (1.32 bps), while Ashlynn Dunbar also averages at least three kills per set (3.18) and is ranked second on the team in digs (2.36 dps). The Aztecs faced one common opponent with Air Force during the non-conference slate, dropping a 3-2 decision to CSU Bakersfield in the season opener.

Watch the game here LIVE on Sunday, September 23rd at 3:00PM EST.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Russian weightlifters charged with doping offenses

The International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) says seven more top Russian weightlifters have been suspended and charged with doping offenses, taking this week’s total to 12.

The IWF said the seven were Dmitry Lapikov, Chingiz Mogushkov, Adam Maligov, Magomed Abuyev, Maksim Sheiko, Nadezhda Evstyukhina, and Yulia Konovalova. Five of them are world and European medalists.

The seven face allegations stemming from World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) investigations into widespread drug use and cover-ups in Russia over the past decade.


Two of them, Lapikov and Evstyukhina, were previously stripped of medals they won at the 2008 Olympics after samples they gave tested positive.

“The IWF regrets these additional cases of doping in our sport,” IWF President Tamas Ajan said in Budapest after the decision.

“We can be satisfied, however, that the IWF has shown once again our determination to protect clean sport and promote clean athletes,” Ajan said in a statement. “We have not shown any hesitation in making the right decisions.”

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Russia’s Nadezda Evstyukhina.

The latest move came after the IWF on Aug. 13, 2019, suspended five other Russian weightlifters, citing “compelling evidence” that they had violated anti-doping rules.

They include former world champions Ruslan Albegov, who also won three Olympic bronze medals, and Tima Turiyeva. The others are double European champions Oleg Chen and David Bedzhanyan, as well as Igor Klimonov, who won silver at the 2019 European championship.

WADA has been analyzing an extensive archive of data obtained in January 2019 from the Moscow Anti-Doping Laboratory in Moscow.

WADA has started handing over its results to sports federations, triggering multiple new charges.

Other sports federations have also started investigations based on the WADA evidence, with the International Biathlon Union banning in June 2019 two Russians — Aleksandr Chernyshov and Aleksandr Pechyonkin — for four years each.

WADA President Craig Reedie has said he expects more than 100 new doping cases to be brought across various Russian sports.

This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Follow @RFERL on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

It was survival of the fittest at the 2019 CrossFit Games

The sound of cheering carried across the Alliant Energy Center as the top athletes from over 100 countries took the field Aug. 1, 2019, during the 2019 CrossFit Games opening ceremony.

Amongst a sea of U.S. competitors, Lt. Col. Anthony Kurz and Capt. Chandler Smith took it all in as they looked around the crowded North Field. Kurz proudly displayed his Army Special Forces flag as a nod to the Special Forces community. Those cheering included members of the U.S. Army Recruiting Command and Warrior Fitness team who were there to support their teammates and engage with the fitness community.

It took Smith and Kurz years to get to this moment, as they stood ready for the “world’s premier” CrossFit competition. At this level, victory would not come easy, considering each workout would test the limits of their athletic ability and resolve.


Capt. Chandler Smith

Just hours after the opening ceremony, Smith was back on the field for his workout in the men’s individual bracket. He was ranked 40th overall at the start of the games.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Capt. Chandler Smith, a member of the U.S. Warrior Fitness Team, competes in the men’s individual competition at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 1, 2019. During the first workout of the day, Smith placed second overall and moved on to the next round of the competition.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits )

There was a lot at stake during the first cut of the competition. Out of the 143 men participating, only 75 would make it to the next round. The first workout was also designed to be a true test of strength and endurance.

Each competitor would need to complete a 400-meter run, three legless rope climbs, and seven 185-pound squat snatches, in under 20 minutes. The field of competitors would then be ranked based on their overall time. For some athletes, the first workout was more than they could handle.

Smith came out strong and maintained his overall pace. In the end, he took second place — 35 seconds behind the leader, Matthew Fraser.

“I knew my competitors were going to come out fast,” Smith said. “I wanted to stay within that top three. By the third set, I wanted to pick up on my squat snatches. This was a good start for the rest of the weekend.”

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Capt. Chandler Smith, a member of the U.S. Warrior Fitness Team, competes in the men’s individual competition at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 2, 2019. During the fourth round, Smith had to complete a 172-foot sled push, 18 bar muscle-ups, and another 172-foot sled push to the finish line in under six minutes.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits )

Moving into the second cut of the competition, Smith looked loose and determined to continue on his previous success.

Competitors had 10 minutes to complete an 800-meter row, 66 kettlebell jerks, and a 132-foot handstand walk. Like the first round, athletes would be ranked and scored on their overall time.

Smith was not far behind the leader after the first exercise. Sitting in a good position, he moved into the 16-kilogram kettlebell jerks and quickly fell behind after a series of “no-repetition” calls by the judge.

Smith placed 48th overall in the workout and only 50 athletes would move on to compete on day two.

Through it all, he wasn’t overly focused on his position, he said. For the first time in a long time, Smith said he was having fun, and he planned to approach each workout with the same high level of intensity.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Capt. Chandler Smith, a member of the U.S. Warrior Fitness Team, competes in the men’s individual competition at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 2 2019. During the fourth round, Smith had to complete a 172-foot sled push, 18 bar muscle-ups, and another 172-foot sled push to the finish line in under six minutes.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits )

“The experience has been phenomenal because I have been around a lot of folks that stayed positive,” he said. “I have learned so much about what it takes for me to perform at my peak. This will hopefully help me in the future in regards to maximizing [my] performance potential.”

On day two of the competition, Smith competed in three events.

The day started with a 6,000-meter ruck with increasing increments of weight. Competitors then moved to the “sprint couplet” event, where they had to complete a 172-foot sled push, 18 bar muscle-ups, and a second sled push back to the finish line. Smith placed fourth in the ruck and 32nd in the sprint couplet.

The last event of the day took place in the arena, where athletes had 20 minutes to complete as many reps as possible. Each rep included five handstand pushups, 10 pistol squats, and 15 pull-ups. Smith placed 13th in the final workout of the day, landing him a spot in the top 20.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Capt. Chandler Smith, a member of the U.S. Warrior Fitness Team, takes a rest after completing in the first round of the men’s individual competition at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 1, 2019. Smith placed second overall after the first workout and moved on to the next round of the competition.

(Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Robert Dodge)

“I would give my performance a nine out of 10,” he said. “I met my goal of making it to the last day and maintained the right competitive attitude throughout the competition.”

Moving on to day three, Smith had one last workout to try to break into the top 10. During the sprint event, competitors had to complete an out-and-back race across North Field. Upon their return, athletes had to cut through several tight turns before crossing the finish line.

Smith gave his all, but at the end of the workout, he tied for 13th place. Officially cut from the competition, he held his head high as he walked off the field ranked 15th overall.

“I controlled everything I could, and gave my absolute maximum effort on all events,” he said. “I feel like I made significant growth this year. I will try to replicate my training and couple it with my improved mental onset to achieve a better result here at the CrossFit Games next year.”

Overall, Smith is honored to represent himself as both a soldier and an athlete, he said. He feels lucky to represent the force at large, knowing there are so many talented soldiers in the fitness field throughout the Army.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Capt. Chandler Smith, a member of the U.S. Warrior Fitness Team, competes in the men’s individual competition at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 3, 2019. During the sprint event, competitors had to complete an out-and-back race across Field. Upon their return, athletes had to cut through several tight turns before crossing the finish line.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits)

“The biggest lesson I can pass on: keep a positive perspective,” he said. “The nature of the Army means our schedules are unpredictable and constant [athletic] training can be hard to come by.”

Soldiers that learn to work past those scheduling conflicts will have a better respect for their journey, Smith said. In the end, there is always an approach a soldier can take to be successful — they just have to find it.

“Leaders in the Army don’t see problems, they see solutions,” he added.

Lt. Col. Anthony Kurz

The men’s master competition started on day two of the CrossFit Games. Kurz, a Special Forces officer assigned to the Asymmetric Warfare Group at Fort Meade, Maryland, was competing in the 40- to 44-year-old age bracket.

Kurz got into CrossFit shortly after graduating from the Special Forces qualification course. While assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, he received his level-one CrossFit certification and delved deeper into the sport.

Whenever he deployed as an Operational Detachment Alpha, or ODA commander, Kurz and his teammates would often engage in CrossFit-type workouts to keep them fit for the fight, he said.

“In an ODA, everybody is always competitive. We would do our [CrossFit] workout of the day and post them on the board. That healthy rivalry makes you better,” he said.

“We have some phenomenal athletes in the Special Forces community, but they train for something different,” Kurz said. “It was good to represent them [at the CrossFit Games].”

Coming into the Games, Kurz was ranked 4th overall and 1st in the online qualifier. On the floor, he appeared healthy and determined, but behind the scenes, he was quietly recovering from a minor shoulder injury, he said.

During his first timed workout, Kurz completed a 500-meter row and 30 bar-facing burpees. He placed fifth out of 10 athletes in his bracket. Hours later, he was back on the floor for his second event. He maintained an excellent position to move up the ranks.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Lt. Col. Anthony Kurz, a member of the U.S. Army Warrior Fitness Team assigned to the Asymmetric Warfare Group in Fort Meade, Md., competes in the Men’s Masters (40-44) Division at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 3, 2019. During the sandbag triplet event, athletes started with a 90-foot handstand walk, then moved to the air bike to burn 35 calories. They then had to carry a 200-pound sandbag for 90 feet to the finish line.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits)

During the second workout, athletes needed to complete five rounds of exercises. Each set included three rope climbs, 15 front squats, and 60 jump rope “double-unders.”

The combination of upper body exercises exacerbated his pre-existing injury, Kurz said. In frustration, he let out a loud yell during the event as he finished in last place.

“I was only pulling with one arm,” he said. “At this level of competition, if something goes wrong, there is nowhere to hide. It is frustrating, but it was also a great learning experience. Everybody wants to be on top of the podium.”

The final event for the day was a 6,000-meter ruck run with increasing increments of weight after each lap. Kurz placed 5th in the workout.

On day three of the games, Kurz had to complete two workouts. The first event was the sandbag triplet. Athletes started with a 90-foot handstand walk, then moved to the air bike to burn 35 calories. They then had to carry a 200-pound sandbag for 90 feet to the finish line. Kurz placed 7th in the event.

The second event of the day, known as the “down and back chipper,” was the most taxing workout thus far. Kurz had to complete an 800-meter run, 30 handstand pushups, 30 dumbbell thrusters, 30 box jump-overs, and 30 power cleans. Competitors had to then go back through the same exercises, finishing the event with the run.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Lt. Col. Anthony Kurz, a member of the U.S. Army Warrior Fitness Team assigned to the Asymmetric Warfare Group in Fort Meade, Md., competes in the Men’s Masters (40-44) Division at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 3, 2019. During the sandbag triplet event, athletes started with a 90-foot handstand walk, then moved to the air bike to burn 35 calories. They then had to carry a 200-pound sandbag for 90 feet to the finish line.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits)

Kurz set a deliberate pace, knowing the event would depend on how his shoulder fared on the second set of handstand push-ups. On the last 10 reps, fatigue and a series of “no-reps” bogged him down, he said. Time expired while he was on his last 800-meter run, and judges were calling on him to stop. He kept running and crossed the finish line while the event crew was setting up for the next heat.

“I never quit on a workout, and I wasn’t going to start today,” he said. “You have got to take the small victories. I was once told: ‘Persistence is a graded event.’ It is something that has always stuck in my head.”

Kurz laid it all on the line on the final day, submitting two of his best workouts of the competition. During the two-repetition overhead squad workout, Kurz lifted 280 pounds and placed second in the event. Moreover, he took first place in the final workout, known as the “Bicouplet 1.”

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Lt. Col. Anthony Kurz, a member of the U.S. Army Warrior Fitness Team assigned to the Asymmetric Warfare Group in Fort Meade, Md., competes in the Men’s Masters (40-44) Division at the 2019 CrossFit Games in Madison, Wis., Aug. 3, 2019. During his second event, Kurz had to complete three rope climbs 15 front squats, and 60 double-unders over five rounds for time.

(Photo by Devon L. Suits)

Kurz placed 9th overall.

“I’m glad I was able to fight back on the last day and go out with an event win. Looking back, 9th isn’t what I expected, but I’m proud of my performance,” he said. “I think I turned in the best performance possible given the limits of my body.”

“We always say that in combat you can have the best plan, but the enemy always gets a vote on how things go. This is no different. I had solid plans going into the WODs, made the right adjustments on the fly, and pushed through the adversity. I capped it all off with an event win — I’ll take it.”

In the end, Kurz was proud to represent the Army and the Special Forces community, he said.

“As I look back at my old [Special Forces] team and I feel like many of them could have done the same thing if given the opportunity and the time to train,” he said. “I feel very lucky. My life led me in a certain way, and I was able to take all this time to get to this level.

“I’m super stoked that people are still excited, given how the weekend has gone for me,” he added. “It has been frustrating and humbling. Even though there were setbacks, I gave everything I had and I’m walking away with my head high.”

This article originally appeared on United States Army. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

These sports icons served during the Battle of the Bulge

(Featured image courtesy of War History Online)

Sports, in large part, were halted when the U.S. military became involved in World War II. The Indy 500 was canceled to save gasoline, and the U.S. Open golf tournament was scrapped favoring resources in rubber, which typically made golf equipment. Several professional athletes, managers, owners, and even rules officials across many leagues enlisted, commissioned, or were drafted.



These sports icons sacrificed the prime of their careers for a cause bigger than themselves. On the anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, we celebrate the lives of some of sports’ greatest stars who served during this time.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Courtesy of World Golf Hall of Fame)

Lloyd Mangrum

“I don’t suppose that any of the pro and amateur golfers who were combat soldiers, Marines, or sailors will soon be able to think of a three-putt green as of the really bad troubles in life,” Mangrum said when he returned from World War II. Mangrum was both a veteran of Normandy and the Battle of the Bulge. Before he left for war to fight with General Patton’s Third Army, he made a pact with his friend, Sergeant Robert Green. Each ripped a id=”listicle-2641582160″ bill in half, vowing to each return it when the war ended. Green was killed in action, thus the pair never rekindled their promise.

Mangrum and his brother spent their childhood in the backyard where his thirst for competition began. “A small creek ran behind our house,” he told the NY Times. “My brother, Ray, and I built a crude green on the opposite bank and had [sic] pitching contests with a rustyblade old mashie somebody had discarded.” Soon he was a caddie learning how to approach the game through judgment. He took first place in the first US Open (1946) golf tournament since its hiatus during World War II. He became known as “Mr. Icicle” for his calmness on the links, which he credits how nothing on the golf course could rattle him like the battlefield.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Ralph Houk

Ralph Houk is not a name that is first mentioned when thinking of a New York Yankee, but he should be. His commanding officer, Caesar Flore, spoke of his battlefield fearlessness when he sent Houk out in a jeep to do reconnaissance on enemy scouting positions. He didn’t return until two nights later, and Flore listed him as ‘missing in action.’ “When he had returned, he had a three day growth of beard and hand grenades hanging all over him,” Flore said. “He was back of the enemy lines the entire time. I know he must’ve enjoyed himself. He had a hole in one side of his helmet, and a hole in the other where the bullet left. When I told him about his helmet he said, ‘I could have [sic] swore I heard a ricochet.'”

Houk rose from Private to Major in four years and earned a Silver Star, a Bronze Star with oak leaf cluster, and a Purple Heart for when he was wounded in the calf during the Battle of the Bulge. After the war, he secured the back-up catcher’s position behind Yogi Berra and became a manager where players referred to him as “The Major” for his wartime discipline.
Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Courtesy of the New York Times.)

Gino Marchetti

Gino Marchetti was known primarily for two things: being a Hall of Fame defensive end for the Baltimore Colts and an entrepreneur who co-owned a restaurant called Gino’s with teammate Alan Ameche. Their influence was so great that members of the community, including New England Patriots Head Coach Bill Belichick, often muttered their slogan “Gino’s, oh yeah!” while they visited players at their favorite hamburger joint.

What most don’t know is that Gino Marchetti served as a machine gunner with Company I, 273rd Regiment of the 69th Infantry Division during the Battle of the Bulge. “You don’t realize that you are going to see some of your friends go down,” Marchetti told ESPN. “You don’t realize any of it. For example, the first time I ever saw snow, I slept in it. It’s hell.” Marchetti credits joining the Army as the greatest thing he had ever done because it gave him the discipline and toughness to compete in the NFL.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Nestor Chylak

Nestor Chylak’s career behind home plate almost never came to be. While serving as a Technical Sergeant in the US Army’s 424 Infantry Regiment, Chylak was severely wounded on January 3, 1945, in the Ardennes Forest. While his battalion braced artillery fire in the blistering cold and blanketed snow, an artillery shell exploded a tree, which sent splinters traveling the speed of bullets into his face. He was blind for ten days, but ultimately regained his eyesight. He was awarded both the Silver Star and the Purple Heart.

Chylak would go on to become one of the most legendary MLB Umpires in the history of the game. He was never one to cower to a feisty manager’s tirade, nor did he get flustered from loud boos from fans. He umpired baseball’s bizarre promotion games like the infamous “10-Cent Beer Night” promotion in Cleveland and Bob Veeck’s “Disco Demolition Night” in Detroit. Both promotions ended in similar flair — a forfeiture and a flying chair. Chylak, however, umpired for 25 years in five World Series and was respected for his fairness.

At the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, a bronze plaque in the Umpire Exhibit says in his jest, “This must be the only job in America that everybody knows how to do better than the guy who’s doing it.”

MIGHTY SPORTS

How this combat vet became a 33-year-old walk-on

U.S. Army veteran Joshua Griffin trained with Rangers and Green Berets and saw combat in Iraq and Afghanistan during his 13 years of military service. Then he decided to become an officer, join ROTC, and play college football.

The Staff Sergeant is now the oldest player in the country on a major college football team.

The 33-year-old walk-on is in his second season at Colorado State University and he credits his military service with much of his success.


Army Veteran Becomes Oldest College Football Player | NBC Nightly News

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Tom Ehlers, CSU’s director of football ops, was impressed with Griffin from the start.

First of all, Griffin cold-called Ehlers in person. At 5’10” and 208 lbs, Griffin certainly looked the part.

More than that, Ehlers quickly realized that “Griffin’s military background could be useful on a young football team in need of leadership.” The problem was that Griffin didn’t have any footage of himself playing — or even the SAT or ACT scores needed to qualify for college attendance.

Still, he was persistent — another skill courtesy of the United States Army. He was finally invited to the walk-on tryouts.

The term walk-on is used to describe an athlete who earns a place on the team without being recruited or, in the case of college football, awarded an athletic scholarship.

Griffin drilled alone in the weeks before tryouts after watching the team practice.

“I would study what the coaches had them doing during individuals and then after practice I would go to these fields right here and I would do exactly what they would do,” he told ESPN.

He was one of three who made the team.

Griffin was attached to the 10th Special Forces and the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment while on active duty. His wartime experiences included 2½ years of service overseas — and he still carries unseen scars with him, including hypervigilance and trouble sleeping.

But he carries the brotherhood with him, too. The players, most of whom are a decade younger than Griffin, look up to him — a fact noticed by the coaching staff, who made him one of ten accountability leaders for the team.

“He’s a great example of what soldiers are like out there,” said Lt. Col. Troy Thomas, the professor of military science who runs CSU’s Army ROTC program.”…When you support people through their goals, it’s amazing what they can accomplish. We’ve been able to support Josh while he gets an education and plays athletics. I suspect great things for him in the future.”

MIGHTY CULTURE

Help Jared Allen’s Wounded Warriors by voting for Maxim’s cover model

Football is back! That means it’s time for me to remind everyone about the best organization around, one that provides homes for America’s wounded warriors, Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors. Allen has long been one of the U.S. military’s biggest fans. In his 12 years in the NFL, Allen was one of the hardest-hitting defensive players around. His foundation builds houses for wounded vets that are specifically adapted for their wounds, at no cost.

Now the Jared Allen Homes for Wounded Warriors is teaming up with Maxim, allowing readers to vote for their favorite cover model, with all proceeds going to building more homes for wounded vets.


Allen has been working with veterans for ten years now, ever since returning from a USO trip to visit troops in the field. He saw what U.S. military veterans experience in combat zones and wanted to give thanks to those who sacrificed themselves for service. The goal is simple: raise money to build or adapt homes suited to the needs of wounded Iraq and Afghanistan veterans – and do it at no cost to them – even if they can only help one warrior at a time. That’s where Maxim – and you – come in.

Readers can vote for their favorite potential Maxim cover model once per day for free, or they can make a “Warrior Vote” where they pay one dollar for every vote, with a minimum donation of . After voting for their free daily vote, all subsequent votes cost a dollar, with again, a minimum of . In order to generate votes, models are able to offer voting rewards, similar to rewards offered on Kickstarter. The winner receives ,000 and a Maxim cover photo shoot while other proceeds go toward Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Robin Takizawa is a Los Angeles-based model and makeup artist, currently in second place in her group. Her father is a Vietnam vet and Purple Heart recipient.

“I was extremely excited to find that the competition was also a fundraiser for Jared Allen’s Homes for Wounded Warriors,” says 2019 entrant Robin Takizawa. “Sadly, there isn’t enough support for veterans once they return. Sometimes home no longer feels like it. This is a cause close to home because my father is a Vietnam veteran and Purple Heart recipient. His combat wounds healed without physically altering his life, however many he knew and served with did not meet the same fate.”

“Ever since I was a little girl, I always dreamt about being in Maxim. I loved the glamor and over-the-top sexiness that comes from being self-confident,” she continues. “It’s an honor to know my bid in this contest is also a chance to fundraise for such an amazing cause.”

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Allen with Navy Corpsman Thomas Henderson and family after giving Henderson the keys to his new home. Henderson lost his leg in an IED attack in Afghanistan.

For Allen, the ten-year journey is one of the best things he’s ever accomplished. Even though his grandfather and younger brother were Marines, the experience changed Allen, inspiring him to create Homes for Wounded Warriors.

“I knew I had to do something to serve our country,” Allen once said of the Jared Allen Homes for Wounded Warriors. “I feel the best way to do that is serve those who serve us.”

If you’re a veteran of the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan who is in need of housing or alterations to suit your disability, apply to Jared Allen Homes for Wounded Warriors on the organization’s website.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Why these environmentally-friendly treadmills are important for airmen

In 2019, the 786th Airlift Wing Force Support Squadron purchased six environmentally-friendly treadmills for use in the north and southside fitness centers.

These treadmills don’t require energy to function and as an individual runs on the treadmill, the machine actually transmits energy back into the power grid.

The utility of these six treadmills has made Master Sgt. Joseph McTaggart, noncommissioned officer in charge of Ramstein Air Base Southside Fitness Center, a candidate in the 2020 U.S. Air Forces in Europe’s Spark Tank competition.

“We just wanted to solve some energy problems (on Ramstein AB), especially at the Northside Fitness Center,” McTaggert said.


The Northside Fitness Center was constructed in 1952. The gym has two large open areas — the main one, which is now used to hold the majority of gym equipment, was once a basketball court. Apart from lighting, the basketball court required no energy costs. Today, much of the gym equipment found on the retired court requires an immense amount of power. In 1952, the fitness demands of today couldn’t be foreseen and it’s evident the Northside Fitness Center wasn’t designed for this magnitude of energy consumption.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

The control panel on one of the new environmentally friendly treadmills featured at the north and southside fitness centers tracks the energy the user generates which is transferred back into the power grid. These treadmills are a part of a vision led by Master Sgt. Joseph McTaggart, noncommissioned officer in charge of Ramstein Air Base Southside Fitness Center, who plans to make both fitness centers more environmentally friendly.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristof J. Rixmann)

“Think about the amount of money we’re spending on our electric bill,” McTaggart said. “We’re at a point where everyone wants to be more energy efficient. This solution hits both points and it’s really a win-win situation for us. We believe, in our experience, this would benefit the U.S. Air Force, in general — this is a no-brainer. We’re producing electricity.”

McTaggart went on to explain these treadmills provide more utility than saving the Air Force money. He said it’s more than that.

“On top of that, the main thing big leadership is excited about is saving money,” McTaggart said. “Let’s talk about the young guys, though — let’s talk about the airmen and why it’s important for them. This is better than running on a traditional treadmill. The way the treadmill is designed, running on it is easier on your knees and your joints. Additionally, because you’re generating the power for the treadmill, the resistance is also greater than a traditional treadmill so you’re actually burning 30%. So, why is this important to airmen? You have a treadmill that is more effective with injury prevention that also allows airmen to perform better on their fitness assessments.”

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Photo by gina lin)

So, what is the Spark Tank and how can intelligent minds with creative solutions for the U.S. Air Force get involved?

Spark Tank is an annual competition in which airmen pitch innovative ideas to top Air Force leadership and a panel of industry experts at the Air Force Association’s Air Warfare Symposium. The Spark Tank competitors are active-duty, Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard airmen and Air Force civilians.

Each year, thousands of attendees watch the innovation pitches to senior leaders. To support Spark Tank, AFWERX launched a crowd-sourcing platform called IdeaScale which allows airmen to share ideas, critique submissions and upvote the most promising solutions. The airmen with the most game changing and upvoted ideas then compete at the culminating event, Spark Tank.

The competition is designed to encourage entrepreneurship, retain innovators and speed adoption of emerging technologies, especially those developed by airmen that bring game changing impact to our force.

This article originally appeared on United States Air Force. Follow @ASAF on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

15 of the best resistance band moves for building strength

Resistance bands rule and if you work out regularly and are not using them, you should. For starters, they’re lightweight, storable, portable, inexpensive, and can double in a pinch as a way to secure luggage to the roof of the family station wagon (no further comment on how this was discovered). Moreover, a resistance band’s simple design means all you have to do to make an exercise easier or harder is increase or decrease the degree to which you stretch them. Unlike dumbbells or kettlebells, they truly are a one-size-fits-all workout aid.

There are a seemingly infinite number of ways to use these bands in your fitness routine, some more effective than others. We’ve put together 15 of the best resistance-band moves to give you a superior total body workout. Ready?


1. Chest pulls

What it works: Pecs, triceps

How to: Hold your resistance band loosely near the center, hands about a foot apart. Raise arms directly out in front of you. Squeeze shoulder blades together and open arms out wide, stretching the band. Slowly release back to center.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Photo by Kelly Sikkema)

2. Front row

What it works: Biceps, deltoids

How to: Stand facing a door. Attach one end of the resistance band to the doorknob. Hold the other end in your right hand and back away from the door until there is light tension on the band when your arm is outstretched. Keeping your back straight, knees slightly bent, bend your right elbow and pull your hand toward your chest. Slowly release.

How many: 10 reps on each side, 3 sets

3. Biceps curl

What it works: Biceps

How to: Stand on the centerline of the resistance band, feet shoulder-width apart. Hold an end in either hand, palms facing forward, so that there is light resistance on the band when your arms are straight by your side. Bend elbows, flex biceps, and raise hands up toward your chest. Slowly release.

How many: 10 reps, 3 sets

4. Pushup

What it works: Everything a normal push up does, only harder

How to: Wrap the band behind your back, bend arms, and hold an end of the band in each hand at chest-height (imagine you’ve just wrapped a scarf around your torso). Without changing your grip, get down on the floor and do a pushup, feeling the extra resistance on your arms as you straighten them.

How many: 20 pushups, 2 sets

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

5. Side steps

What it works: Glutes, quads

How to: Tie the resistance band around your ankles so that there is light tension when your feet are about 6 inches apart. Bend knees and take a wide step sideways to the right, feeling the resistance as you do. Bring left foot toward right.

How many: 10 steps to each side, 2 sets

6. Plank walks

What it works: Hips, glutes

How to: Tie the resistance band around your ankles so that there is light tension when your feet are about 6 inches apart. Get down in the extended pushup position (arms straight). Take a wide side step to the right, stepping your right arm over to follow. Step left foot and arm over to return to start position.

How many: 10 steps to each side, 2 sets

7. Reverse flye

What it works: Rhomboids, deltoids

How to: Stand perpendicular to a door. Attach one end of the resistance band to the doorknob. Hold the other end in your right hand and move away from the door until there is light tension on the band when your arm is outstretched. Keeping feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, bend at the waist so your torso is parallel to the floor. Pull your outstretched arm toward the floor, keeping it straight. Release back to the side.

How many: 10 reps on each side, 3 sets

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Photo by Scott Webb)

8. Lateral raise

What it works: Deltoids

How to: Stand on the centerline of the resistance band, feet shoulder-width apart. Hold an end in either hand so that there is light resistance on the band when your arms are straight by your side. Bend forward at the waist slightly, keeping your back straight. Keeping arms straight, raise them directly out the sides until they reach shoulder height. Release.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

9. Shoulder press

What it works: Triceps, shoulders

How to: Stand in a staggered position, right foot about a foot in front of the left. Hook the center of the resistance band under your back (left) heel. Hold an end in either hand so that there is light resistance when your elbows are bent and tucked in at your sides, hands raised to shoulder height. Using your core to stabilize your body, press hands overhead, fully extending your arms. Bend elbows and lower hands back to shoulder height.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

10. Seated row

What it works: Upper and middle back, biceps

How to: Start sitting on the floor with legs straight in front of you, resistance band hooked around the soles of your feet. Hold one end of the band in each hand so that there is light tension when your arms are stretched out in front of you. Bend elbows out to the side and pull hands toward your chest, keeping your back straight. Release.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

11. Leg lifts

What it works: Hamstrings, glutes

How to: Tie the resistance band around your ankles so that there is light tension when your feet are about 6 inches apart. Get down in the plank position (resting on elbows). Keeping your back straight, engage your glutes and raise right leg as high as you can behind you. Slowly release.

How many: 10 reps on each side, 2 sets

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

(Photo by Geert Pieters)

12. Side leg lifts

What it works: Hip abductors, glutes

How to: Tie the resistance band around your ankles so that there is light tension when your feet are about 6 inches apart. Stand straight with left hand touching a wall for support. Raise your right leg out to the side as high as you can, keeping it straight. Release.

How many: 15 reps on each side, 3 sets

13. Adductor squeeze

What it works: Adductors, glutes

How to: Stand perpendicular to a door. Attach one end of the resistance band to the doorknob. Tie the other end around your right ankle and move away from the door until there is light tension on the band when your right leg is outstretched to the side. (Place a chair in front on you for support if necessary.) From this position, squeeze your inner thigh muscles and bring your right leg down and across your midline, keeping leg straight. Slowly release back out to the side.

How many: 15 reps per side, 3 sets

14. Standing chest press

What it works: Pecs, biceps, upper back

How to: Tie the center of the resistance band to a doorknob, leaving equal amounts of band on either side. Facing away from the door, hold an end of the band in each hand so that there is light tension on the band when your elbows are bent and hands are at your chest. Stagger your feet for balance, engage your core, are press both arms forward until they are straight. Bent elbows and release.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

15. Squats

What it works: Quads, glutes

How to: Stand on the centerline of the resistance band, feet shoulder-width apart. Bend knees and drop into a squat position, knees over toes and thighs as parallel to the floor as you can get them. Hold an end of the band in either hand and adjust your grip so that there is light resistance when knees are bent, elbows are bent, and hands are tucked at your chest. Keeping your hands at chest height, straighten legs to standing position. Return to squat.

How many: 10 reps, 2 sets

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

The mathematical reason NFL teams need to be aggressive on 4th down

Ask any military historian: Tactical aggression is a game changer. Throughout history, forces who were more aggressive in combat saw a lot more success compared their predecessors. Ulysses S. Grant’s determination to take the war to the Confederates led to a win for the Union in the Civil War. When Maj. Gen. Lloyd Fredenhall was soundly beaten by the aggressive Nazi Afrika Corps in Tunisia, he was replaced by the famously aggressive George S. Patton, who saw resounding success. The U.S. strategy of building an overwhelming force to push Iraq out of Kuwait led to a decisive victory in a mere 40 days during the Gulf War.

In a game of strategy like NFL football, the same kind of aggression pays off.


For anyone who saw the Bengals-Chiefs game on Oct. 21, 2018, watching Cincinnati opt to take a field goal in the 3rd quarter while down by 30-plus points was a real head-scratcher. Why not risk the turnover when you’re running out of the time it takes to score the four touchdowns you need?

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)
Maybe you don’t know who their coach is.

That call — still a bad one — is one made over and over by conservative coaches, even in situations not quite as extreme as the one Cincinnati faced that Sunday night. If a team is facing a 4th down with 4 yards to go on their opponent’s 40 yard line, there’s a good chance they’ll still opt to punt the ball away.

They shouldn’t.

Well, maybe the Bengals always should. Anyway…

Kicking the ball, either for a punt or a field goal, is the safe choice. Whenever a team opts for the kick, fans and sportscasters alike praise the coach for making that decision. Economists and statisticians, on the other hand, lose their minds.

Why? Because there’s no real reason for a coach to be so conservative. Brian Burke, a former Naval aviator who used to fly the F-18C, is a nationally recognized expert on advanced sports analytics. Burke is currently an analyst for ESPN. In 2014, he published a study on Advanced Football Analytics that took a look at 4th-down decision making.

The longitudinal study assumes that coaches want to maximize the number of points they score while minimizing the number of points the other team scores. Then, it took thousands of real NFL plays on 4th down to calculate the potential value of each situation. Every down versus yardage situation has an “expected point” value and a value attached to the result of previous play, which affects the value of that play.

For example, the expected points value of a touchdown is actually 6.3 points because the opponent gets the ball back on the next play, whose value is .07. If you understand the value of the situation a team is in on 4th down, then you can find the statistically-driven decision the coach should make on that down.

If you don’t understand the math, don’t worry about it. People who do understand math created a handy graphic for the New York Times, based on Burke’s calculation. So we can look at the Bengals horrible performance in Kansas City a different way.

The horrible ball handling that led to the turnover aside, the Bengals tried for a fake punt on 4 and 9 from their own 37-yard-line with almost the entire second quarter remaining. Bengals coach Marvin Lewis tried a play that worked against the Chicago Bears in a preseason matchup. No matter how the ball was handled, the Times‘ 4th Down Bot says they should have punted it away.

Later in the game, with 6:20 left in the 3rd quarter and the Bengals down 28-7, Lewis opted to kick the field goal from the Kansas City 15-yard-line. Bengals fans everywhere were livid, given the score. While the the bot created by Burke’s formula and the New York Times doesn’t account for what to do in a blowout situation, Lewis made the mathematically correct call.

Women’s Soccer — Boise State at Air Force (Friday, 10/12, 8:00PM EST)

Too bad math isn’t enough to make Bengals fans hate Marvin Lewis any less.

Looking at the 2018 season, let’s see if there’s a correlation between game-winning success and 4th down aggression.

As of week 7, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers are a staggering 4-4 when comes to first downs on 4th down — but their record is still a measly 3-3. That doesn’t correlate, but the teams with the next-highest percentages in 4th down conversions are the Saints (at 87.5 percent) and the Chiefs (at 80 percent). New Orleans and Kansas City are first in their respective divisions. Five of the ten most successfully aggressive teams on 4th down also lead in total yardage, points per game, and total points this season.

One caveat: the least successful on 4th down conversions are also the least successful teams so far this year. So… know your own limitations.

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