Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery? - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY SPORTS

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

If you’ve noticed a bunch of new beers at the supermarket with taglines like “for the active lifestyle” and “the athlete’s choice,” you might be thinking, “well, that sounds more fun than a sports recovery drink!” More fun, maybe. But more effective? Not so fast.

“Functional” or “performance” beers have been on a rapid upward trajectory in the last few years thanks to some savvy marketing, led by a growing demand for beverages that are lower in calories and higher in things traditionally found in health drinks, like electrolytes and micronutrients.

While the enhanced ingredients have little downside, the actual payoff of drinking an electrolyte-infused lager is unclear. For starters, “any alcohol is a diuretic and therefore not something an athlete benefits from,” says Marie Spano, RD, sports nutritionist for the Atlanta Braves and lead author of “Nutrition for Sport, Exercise and Health.” While some of these beers have a lower ABV, Spano also cautions that the addition of “healthy” ingredients don’t tell the whole story.


“Just containing these ingredients doesn’t tell me anything — how much is in there, is it bioavailable, what does this actually do for the athlete or active individual?” she asks. That is to say, much of this is a marketing gimmick. “Beer does not hydrate anyone better than a sports drink or post-workout shake.” Not to mention water. Bottom line: If you want a beer, have a beer. But don’t pretend you’re doing it for your body, and “don’t use this as your irrational excuse to drink beer,” says Spano, because the science doesn’t back you up.

Claim check on popular “performance beers”

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Sufferfest FTK Pale Ale

The claim: The company says this beer, a runner’s acronym for “Fastest Known Time,” is fermented from grains containing gluten, then designed to remove it afterward. The beer also contains black currants, and salt to replace electrolytes after a workout.

The reality: Unless you are the 1% of Americans who are gluten intolerant, there is no reason to remove gluten from your beer. Replacing electrolytes is a good thing, although you could also do it for fewer calories through low-cal sports drinks or eating a banana.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Dogfish Head SeaQuench Ale

The claim: SeaQuench contains 4.9% ABV, 140 calories, 9g carbs, 2g protein, and 0g fat per 12 oz. serving. The website calls it “a perfect pairing for an active lifestyle.”

The reality: To a certain extent, the carbs in beer can help with your post-race recovery. But consider: Sports nutritionists recommend 30 to 90 grams of carbs immediately after exercise to speed the recovery process; at 9 grams, you’re going to need a lot of SeaQuench. Moreover, the ratio of carbs to protein is an important element of recovery, a formula of either 3:1 or 4:1. Two grams is better than zero, but it’s still lacking on the protein front.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Harpoon Brewery Rec League Pale Ale

The claim: Brewed with Mediterranean sea salt, buckwheat, and chia seeds, this beer is touted as a perfect ale for recovery from a tough workout.

The reality: You can’t taste the chia seeds — which is probably a good thing in your beer. (Also, “chia is a good seed, but there are no known performance benefits to eating it,” says Spano.) As for the sea salt, “sodium is needed after a workout or race, but you can get it from sprinkling a little salt on your meal — you don’t need a beer to get salt.” Rec League’s strongest selling point may be its 3.8 ABV, a low-alcohol content that means if you don’t mind the calories, you can throw back a few without experiencing as much dehydration as your regular brew.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY FIT

‘Therapy on ice’ helps vets heal, give back to community

The buzz of the crowd had Sgt. 1st Class Michael Vaccaro on edge. Then a loud bang made him look around nervously.

He knew the noise came from a Zamboni machine, yet its exhaust made him think of the aftermath of a roadside bomb.

All his stress melted away immediately, however, as soon as he stepped out onto the ice.

“When I’m on the ice, no matter what happened before, everything dissipates,” he said. “It’s like a fresh start.”


Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Former Army Spc. Matt Holben, Capital Beltway Warriors assistant team captain and defensive player, hits the puck up ice during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional Hockey Challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Vaccaro is one of the co-founders of the Capital Beltway Warriors, a hockey team of veterans with disabilities founded two years ago.

Veterans on the team open up to each other and talk about how they cope with injuries, stress and other issues, said retired Maj. David Dixon, another co-founder of the team.

“It’s like a giant support group,” he said, “or therapy on ice, as we like to call it.”

Many of the players have some level of post-traumatic stress disorder from service in Iraq, Afghanistan or other hot spots, Dixon said. He personally survived four deployments to Iraq, where he was shot in the back and shaken up by three different improvised explosive devices.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Retired Maj. David Dixon, president and executive director of the Capital Beltway Warriors, makes game notes while coaching players between periods during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Giving back

Dixon and a number of the other veterans also coach youth hockey teams and a few of them help with a local blind hockey team, the Washington Wheelers.

“Giving back to the community often gives them a sense of purpose,” Dixon said of the veterans, adding that it helps minimize depression and PTSD.

Dixon puts in more than 20 volunteer hours a week managing the Capital Beltway Warriors as president and executive director of the team. He helps solicit sponsors, run meetings, apply for grants, recruit players and schedule games.

His time on the ice as a player-coach is extra.

Warrior Hockey

www.youtube.com

“In a sick kind of way, I enjoy all the hard work,” he said. “You go from commanding troops to working in a cubicle,” he said about retiring from the Army and beginning a civilian job.

He explained that managing the hockey team gives him a renewed sense of purpose.

“You find that niche in life that gives you purpose and whether it has a monetary award or not, that’s what you’re supposed to do,” he said.

He helps make the games special for the warriors with lights, music, an announcer and filling the stands with veterans. Local chapters of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion in northern Virginia help bring veterans from retirement homes to the games, Dixon said.

Vaccaro also spends several hours per week helping the Capital Beltway Warriors and other veteran hockey teams. He spends a week every year helping run the USA Hockey camp in Buffalo, New York, where they select the national sled hockey team.

He serves as a referee for blind hockey and sled hockey. He helps stand up other Warrior division hockey teams. In November, he spent a few days in Philadelphia helping the Flyers start a warrior team.

“This is my therapy,” he said of the volunteer work. “This is what keeps me going.”

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Former Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joey Martell, Capital Beltway Warriors team captain, takes a shot during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Spreading the word

Just over two years ago, Vaccaro met up with Dixon who was interested in starting a Warrior hockey team in Virginia.

They met in the Pentagon food court in December 2016. “We sat down and started sketching stuff out on napkins,” Dixon said.

They laid out plans for a team that would play in rinks across Northern Virginia and Southern Maryland.

They found players by word of mouth. They showed up at “stick and shoot” sessions and asked if anyone was a military veteran with a disability rating.

Now they have 76 veterans with disabilities on the team and they play other warrior clubs. A game in Ashburn Dec. 22, 2018, pitted the USA Warriors from Maryland against the Capital Beltway Warriors. The teams also play in annual tournaments.

There are now 16 warrior teams across the United States. The minimum requirement to play on one of the teams is a 10 percent VA disability. Some of the players are 100 percent disabled and play with prosthetics.

Some of the veterans, like Vaccaro, have been playing hockey since they were 3 years old. Dixon, however, did not pick up the sport until he was 40.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Army Reserve Sgt. 1st Class Michael Vaccaro serves as referee for the charity exhibition game between the Capital Beltway Warriors and a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Photo by EJ Hersom)

Ramadi RPG

In 2006 and 2007, Vaccaro was an advisor to an Iraqi Army unit in Ramadi. He and two Marines were on patrol when they were pinned down by machine-gun fire. Then an insurgent fired a rocket-propelled grenade.

“It hit the wall in front of me and knocked me back. Next thing I remember, I heard this really loud ringing in my ears and there was a Marine dragging me back into the courtyard. They were calling for air support.

“We finished the patrol,” Vaccaro said, explaining aerial medical evacuation was not available. A doctor patched him up, and a couple of days later, he was back out on patrol.

After his tour in Iraq, he came back to Virginia, where he had been a reservist with the 80th Training Division. But he had PTSD issues. He decided to go to Liberia in western Africa as a contractor to help put about 2,000 Liberian soldiers through basic training.

“I thought that would help, but I just ended up coming back with the same issues,” he said. “That’s another thing: You can’t hide from this.

“Everybody handles PTSD in a different way. I tried the group therapy stuff and it just didn’t work.”

He received treatment and medication from Veterans Affairs, but the issues persisted. When he smelled fresh bread, for instance, it reminded him of the flatbread Iraqi soldiers baked every morning.

“That’s a good smell,” he said. But then his mind would continue to remember until he imagined the smell of an IED.

“You’ve got to face your fears. You’ve got to face your issues,” he said. “I was trying to hide from it and hockey has helped me open up and talk about it.”

About 10 years ago, he became involved in the first-of-its-kind USA Warrior hockey team stood up by a patient at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Maryland.

“When I’m on the ice, things slow down; things are different,” Vaccaro said.

Both he and his family noticed the difference in him after playing hockey.

“It really helped me,” he said. “The first thing I said to myself when I started realizing that is, ‘I’ve got to get other veterans involved in this.'”

So he became the national representative for USA Hockey in its Warrior division to help stand up teams. He does that in his spare time when he is not working as a civilian employee for the Army Corps of Engineers or on duty as an Army Reserve NCO.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

David Dixon, coach of the Capital Beltway Warriors, provides tactical advice to players between periods during a holiday exhibition game with a Congressional hockey challenge team at MedStar Capitals Iceplex, Dec. 16, 2018.

(Gary Sheftick, Army News Service)

Natural coach

Dixon was coaching little league baseball when he was approached by his son’s hockey coach, Bobby Hill.

“He said he really liked the way I worked with the kids and he could use my help on the ice coaching,” Dixon recalled.

Dixon told him he did not skate, but Hill said he could take care of that. He got Dixon out on the ice and taught him the basics of hockey.

Dixon went to adult learn-to-play sessions Wednesday evenings at Ashburn Ice House. He participated in adult pick-up games after helping coach his son’s youth team.

He eventually took over as head coach of the Ashburn “Honey Badgers” peewee hockey team.

In the meantime, however, he heard of the USA Warriors hockey team and the effects it was having on disabled veterans in Maryland. He thought it would be great to bring the same benefits to veterans in northern Virginia.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Matt Holben (No. 19) of the Capital Beltway Warriors, and Joey Martell (No. 21) take the puck down ice with three members of a Congressional hockey challenge team not far behind, during an exhibition game Dec. 16, 2018 at MedStar Capitals Iceplex.

(Gary Sheftick, Army News Service)

Three pillars

The warrior hockey program aims to provide purpose, education and camaraderie that veterans miss after they separate from the service, Dixon said.

The team creates an environment that in some ways simulates being back around a military unit, said Matt Holben, alternate team captain for the Capital Beltway Warriors.

“It feels good, because you’re back with the guys, you’re back with the unit,” he said.

“We’ve got members with both physical and mental disability,” he added. “It’s hard for them to share their story, but when you talk to them, it’s just that little bit of relief they get when they’re in the locker room and on the team.”

“We’re helping each other,” Vaccaro said. “And half of the guys don’t even realize we’re helping each other, but that’s what we’re doing.”

The help is not limited to the rink either, Dixon said.

There is another part to the program that informs veterans of benefits available to them and helps with issues.

Anything from service dogs to getting help building a house, to loans, and more is available, Dixon said.

“We don’t do it all ourselves. We reach out to other veteran service organizations to get the help and education these guys need,” he said. “We have a whole network of VSOs that we can tap into.”

Vaccaro summed it up: “It’s veterans helping veterans.”

This article originally appeared on the United States Army. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

How a miracle on ice forever changed the USA

We have all seen upsets in sports before. We might see a number one team in college football lose to an unranked bottom feeder, a team barely making the NBA playoffs sweeping the defending champs in the first round, a boxer throwing a desperate punch and knocking out a champion. But forty years ago today, on Feb. 22, 1980, the sports world was rocked to its core. The U.S. Men’s hockey team beat the mighty Soviet Union team at the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid, NY.


This upset was truly a David versus Goliath upset. The Americans had no reason or chance to win… at least that is what everyone thought.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

NHL.com

In the Olympics then, there were strict “amateur” rules on who was eligible. Professional athletes were not allowed to play. Hence Americans couldn’t send NBA or NHL players in the Olympics even if they wanted to. So, the USA (and most of the world) had to rely on college kids and other non-professionals. Once you were done with school, you got a job and trained on your own time. The Communist Bloc, however, found an obvious way around that. They more or less gave athletes bogus jobs and paid them to train all the time. They were essentially professionals.

The Soviets dominated the international hockey scene because of this. Prior to this game, they had won five Gold Medals and 14 World Championships. They had been playing together for years and were a well-oiled machine. In contrast, the Americans had only been together for a few months. They were college kids who usually only had one chance at the Olympic games because of the amateur rules.

In an exhibition at Madison Square Garden before the Olympics, the USA was trashed by the Soviets by a score of 10-3. The Soviets went into the Olympic games as a very confident team.

As the tournament progressed in the round-robin format, both teams played well. The Americans fought to a draw and several victories, while the Soviets steamrolled everyone they played.

People often forget, but it wasn’t the Gold Medal Game. And if you remember watching it live, you remember wrong — the game was on a tape delay by about three hours. Over 18,500 people packed the arena at Lake Placid, and there was a patriotic fervor in the air. People claim the U-S-A chant started that night.

Nowadays, we are used to the super-patriotic feelings at sporting events, but things were different back then.

America was in a bit of a rough spot.

There was still a pall hanging over the country over the lives lost in Vietnam, made worse when Saigon fell in 1975. There was inflation and gas shortages to deal with. The value of the dollar was low. There was stagnation in the economy. Urban decay and high rates of violent crime racked American cities. The Ayatollah in Iran was still holding Americans hostage after the embassy takeover.

The mood could best be described by a term that was applied to a Jimmy Carter speech – “malaise.”

Americans really needed a moment of pride. It came that night.

The USA played hard, scrappy, and didn’t back down. They went down three times and came back to tie three times. They went ahead in the third period on a Mike Eruzione goal to make it 4-3. When you look at the stats of the game, the U.S. was really outplayed in most aspects. They held off the Soviet attack 10 minutes, which probably seemed like an eternity.

As the time clicked off the clock, the crowd grew more insane, and the arena turned into a human pressure cooker ready to blow.

Al Michaels, feverishly counted down the time with one of the most iconic calls of all time.

“11 seconds, you’ve got 10 seconds, the countdown going on right now! Morrow, up to Silk. Five seconds left in the game. Do you believe in miracles? YES!”

The effect was immediate. Pandemonium reigned in the stands. Players exuberantly celebrated. The Soviets looked on in shock and awe. Coach Herb Brooks ran into the locker room and broke down in tears. When the players went in, they broke out into “God Bless America.” They then took a call from President Carter (and they still had a game to go to win Gold!).

Seriously this video will give you chills.

Sports Illustrated didn’t even have to put words on the cover. The picture alone told the story.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

The country was gripped with patriotic fervor, and after what seemed like a long national nightmare, Americans felt that miracles do indeed happen, and good times were ahead.

MIGHTY FIT

5 ways to get in shape this Winter

While on active duty, maintaining some level of fitness is essential. It is literally a requirement of your everyday life. But once it’s not required, it’s very easy to find yourself completely out of shape and overweight.

After giving yourself a look in the mirror, you’ll probably pine for the days of old — the days of tone and definition. Well, it’s never too late; here are a few ways to get in shape fast.


Summer is over, but that doesn’t mean you can’t or shouldn’t get a headstart on next summer. Use this winter as a springboard into a body that everyone envies next summer
Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Full-body workouts are a hot topic these days

(Photo via Greatist.com)

Full-body training

Full-body training is a form of weightlifting that has been gaining lots of popularity in the fitness world recently, and it’s exactly what it sounds like. Throughout the course of a single session, you’ll target each muscle group, getting a pump for your entire body.

Despite its recent popularity, full-body training has been around for ages. Design a routine that pays extra attention to your trouble spots and you should see some serious results very fast.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Johnny Bravo…the Bro Split poster dude.

(Cartoon Network Studios)

Bro-Splits

We all know what bro splits are, even if we don’t necessarily know them by that name. A bro-split is a routine that focuses on your back, your biceps, your chest, and your triceps. This technique, too, has been around for far longer than most of us have been alive.

There’s an obvious benefit to this: it’s simple and it’ll get you looking swole quickly. That being said, there’s must more to being fit than looking fit. If you’re only in it for the beach bod, this might be the method for you.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

CrossFit is often the punchline of gym jokes, but the results and popularity can’t be denied.

(Photo via BoxRox.com)

CrossFit

Ahh, the much-maligned CrossFit. If you’re a CrossFit junkie, then you already know that everyone has an opinion on the recent trend. In the blink of an eye, CrossFit has managed to blossom into a full-blown sport that is beloved and practiced worldwide. Truthfully, CrossFit is an amazing workout and will give you great results… even if the exercises look a little funny at times.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Sprinter body vs marathon runner body? Both are low on fat, so pick your method and enjoy.

(Photo via RachelAttard.com)

Marathon training

Running is one of the most time-tested ways to lose weight and training for a marathon is one of the most certain ways to commit to running many miles with regularity. There’s simply no way to do all the running you need to prepare for a marathon without slimming down.

As an added bonus, committing to a run (marathon or otherwise) forces you to get your diet together. You simply won’t be able to go the distance without a proper diet.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Bodyweight exercises have been around since the beginning of time. Maybe it’s time you gave it a try.

Photo via Boss Royal.com

Calisthenics 

Can you do 40 push-ups without stopping? How about 40 dips within 2 minutes? How about 40 pull-ups in that same timespan?

Chances are, especially if you’re a recently retired/separated veteran, you can do the push-ups with no issue. The others, however, are going to be more challenging. Put together a quick, fun, and sweaty, circuit-style workout of your own and see the combined benefits of body weight movements and aerobic exercise.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 3

Welcome to the Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 3, where we separated the overreactions from the underestimations. So pull up a seat and grab a pad and a pen, because this after action report will help you see through the settling dust and give your lineup hope in week 4.


The NFL leader in yards per route run (3.26), air yards (291) and target share (38%) is also one the best separators in the game. Keenan Allen is on his way to a career year, boys.pic.twitter.com/kev2Wqflnk

twitter.com

Blue chip medal

Keenan Allen, WR, Chargers- Ladies and gentlemen, the number one receiver in fantasy football. It’s not close. He has 87.7 fantasy points, and the next closest, Julio Jones, has 69.5. What more does Keenan Allen have to do to prove to fantasy owners that he’s a sure thing? He’s got an accurate quarterback who loves him. He’s insanely consistent. He can run routes, he can catch, he’s a red-zone target. He’s arguably the most reliable player in all of fantasy football and could very well win you your league.

Russel Wilson, QB, Seahawks- This preseason Bill Simmons went on the record saying this could “be the year that Russel Wilson ends up on the waiver wire come week 8.” Well, it’s week four, and Russel Wilson is the fourth-highest scoring fantasy QB. He still uses his legs to make plays. His team is playing from behind, so he’s forced to throw the ball constantly, jacking his usability numbers way up. He’s a plug and play.

Terry McLaurin, WR, Redskins- Congratulations to Terry McLaurin for becoming We Are the Mighty’s first-ever Promotion Watch turned Blue Chip Medal winner. He is the fourth-highest scoring receiver in fantasy football. He is 110% bonafide the real deal.

Mark Ingram II, RB, Ravens– Mark Ingram keeps proving himself. He did it on the Saints last year, and he’s doing it this year, too. Even against a stout Chiefs defense—he put up RB1 numbers. Lamar Jackson’s playmaking ability stretches defenses out and causes them to play deep and to the hash, leaving room for Ingram to gash teams for big-time gains. He’s an RB1 moving forward.
A touchdown was not scored by Baker Mayfield and the Browns on this playpic.twitter.com/qsOib4JL7e

twitter.com

Loss of rank

Stefon Diggs, WR, Vikings- Well it’s week three and Diggs has six catches and 101 yards on the year. He is the 70th WR in fantasy football currently, and he couldn’t seem to make anything happen against an absolutely terrible Oakland secondary. Sound the alarm on Stefon Diggs. If you can trade him for 50 cents on the dollar—go buy yourself a couple of gumballs.

Sony Michel, RB, Patriots- How many more opportunities do you give Sony Michel to prove that he is worthy of a RB2/Flex start? He has played against some of the worst competition in the NFL. Last week, after James White’s absence, he was the only solid weapon in the backfield—and he still put up meager numbers. As of now, he is running back 43 in fantasy scoring. The Pats offense is electric, but Michel doesn’t have the spark this year.

Baker Mayfield, QB, Browns- Baker Mayfield is perhaps the least worrisome of the Loss of Rank winners (losers?) this week. He can still make plays with his legs, he is surrounded by weapons, and he doesn’t have a difficult schedule. However, there are five big problems, and they’re all supposed to be blocking for him. Cleveland’s offensive line is so atrocious that Baker gets jumpy within a half-second of getting the snap. He’s moving out of the pocket prematurely (been there, buddy) and making short-armed throws. His fantasy value was grossly overestimated moving into the season.

OJ Howard, TE, Buccaneers- OJ Howard finally racked up a couple of catches. Then he fumbled. He has had an abysmal start. He has little to no red zone targets (which is what his supporters cite when continuing to start him). He was even called out by head coach Bruce Arians after week one. They say insanity is repeating the same action expecting a different result. So if you have OJ Howard and start him, yet again, in week 4— look forward to 13 more weeks of padded white walls, dixie cup meds, and goose eggs from your tight end.

DAWSON KNOX IS ABOUT THAT ACTION (via @BuffaloBills)pic.twitter.com/Stkmy0AtPd

twitter.com

Promotion watch

Daniel Jones, QB, Giants- Giants fans rejoice—the Eli Manning era has finally reached its end. And boy oh boy was it a coming-out party for Daniel Jones. In a poetic display of how much younger he is than Manning, Jones picked up 28 yards and 2 TDs on the ground. He was lethal in the air too, finishing with 336 passing yards and two more touchdowns. He is surely worth a waiver wire look, even with Saquon Barkley’s injury.

Philip Lindsay, RB, Broncos- Well if you were anything like us, Philip Lindsay brought his A-game to your bench this week. After a fortnight of slumber, Lindsay was a man possessed in week three. He has racked up 26 fantasy points and was clearly the red zone favorite over workhorse partner Royce Freeman. Keep a very close eye on Lindsay moving into week four.

Dawson Knox, TE, Bills- The Bills are surprising everyone this year. They are the Bills, though, and will find a way to mess up this success. One undeniable bright spot that can’t be buffed out is rookie tight end Dawson Knox. He finished with 67 yards (including one monster 49-yard catch and run that was a finalist for Badass hit of the week medal) and a TD. If you’re in a deep league or strapped for tight ends, give Knox a waiver nod.

Taylor Gabriel, WR, Bears- File Taylor Gabriel under the same “sleepy start” tab as Philip Lindsay. The ex-Falcons receiver had an insane Monday night finishing with three touchdowns. Trubisky looked a bit sharper, too, which bodes well for any Chicago pass catcher. This was against a shaky Redskins secondary, so this promotion watch should be met with cautious vigilance.

Here’s Jeff Heath’s hit on Allen Hurns. Looked bad, but Hurns was able to get up and walk off the field under his own power. #MIAvsDALpic.twitter.com/SWrPpnypJI

twitter.com

Badass hit of the week

Jeff Heath

Well, our two-game streak of offensive lineman winning the Badass Hit of the Week Medal has come to a violent end. Jeff Heath’s hit on ex-cowboys-teammate Allen Hurns can only be described as attempted gridiron murder (although it does look like he was trying to play the ball and ended up decapitating Hurns unintentionally in the process). According to multiple sources, Heath actually texted Hurns after the game and said he “hated the outcome of the play” and was “thinking about him.” Damn. Us too, man.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Hit your target heart rate with these 6 hardcore exercises

Going for a jog. Shooting hoops. Running stairs. Pumping iron. These forms of exercise have one thing in common: They all do a great job of raising your heart rate. That’s a critical component to any worthwhile workout because an elevated heart rate does several things for you: First, it helps you lose weight. The higher your heart rate, the more energy your body will expend, and the more pounds you’ll shed. Secondly, it helps you burn fat. Getting your heart rate up to just 50 percent of its maximum means that roughly 85 percent of the calories you burn will come from fat. So even if you’re just walking fast or bike-commuting to the office, you’re still getting fit.


So what target heart rate should you be hitting when exercising? There are actually five heart rate zones that experts focus on when designing workouts, ranging from an easy warm-up zone to an all-out sprint zone. While the easy zone won’t do much for your calorie burning and the max heart rate zone is too intense to sustain for more than a few seconds. The intermediary zones of hard and very hard provide the biggest bang for your buck.

To improve your fitness, the most important thing is that once your heart rate is up, you keep it up. That means minimal rest between sets, and maximum effort for each move. Follow this workout to hit your target heart rate — and keep it there — for 20 minutes.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

1. Climbing stairs

Find a stairwell or stadium with at least 4 flights of stairs. Race to the top, then jog back down, five times.

2. Jumping jacks

To get the max heart rate benefit from this exercise, make sure you raise your arms overhead each and every time. Aim for one jack per second. Go hard for one minute, then rest 30 seconds. Repeat two more times.

3. Jumping rope

It may remind you of your childhood, but there’s nothing easy about jumping rope. Skip the bounce and jump only once per revolution, requiring you to spin the rope faster and work a little harder. Start by jumping 30 seconds with 10 seconds rest, and progress to one minute of jumping followed by 20 seconds rest. Do 3 times.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

(Photo by dylan nolte)

4. Butt kicks/high knees

Sprint drills will raise your heart rate, but they also require space. Instead, practice your quick feet and fine motor skills by moving your legs as fast as you can vertically, hiking knees high for 20 seconds, followed by 20 seconds of kicking your heels to your butt as many times as you can while running in place. Rest 20 seconds. Do 5 sets.

5. Burpees

From standing, bend your knees, crouch down to the floor, place your hands on the ground, and jump your feet back so you are in an extended plank position. Jump feet forward toward your hands again, push off the floor and jump into a vertical position. Do as many as you can for 30 seconds. Rest for 10 seconds. Repeat 5 times.

6. Push-ups/sit-ups

They aren’t typically considered aerobic moves, but these all-over body strengtheners can really raise your heart rate if you do them all-out without rest. Drop and do 20 pushups, then flip over to your back and immediately do 20 sit-ups. With both, you’re aiming for a 1-1.5 second timeframe per move. Do 5 sets.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

The right way to use a heart rate monitor

The latest crop of monitors ranges from basic to super high-tech. To start, you need to choose from the chest-strap variety (a sensor on a strap around your chest electronically detects your pulse and sends a signal to your wristwatch, which then displays the info) or a wrist monitor (takes your pulse via a sensor on the back of a watch). While chest straps provide the most accurate reading, some people prefer the convenience of the simpler wrist version.

A basic monitor will track workout time, and show your high, low, and average heart rate during the session. More sophisticated models will allow you to program a desired heart rate range pre-workout, so you can monitor whether you are staying within the targeted zone.

Some will also track how long it takes your heart rate to return to normal after an intense aerobic bout. That’s key because length of recovery is equated with how fit you are (the faster your pulse can return to its baseline, the fitter you are getting).

To figure out your ideal heart rate for different types of workouts, check out the recommendations from the American Heart Association, then program your monitor to make sure your workout falls within the parameter that’s best for you.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Watch this dedicated 49er shake every military hand before MNF

While some people see the NFL’s Salute to Service as a PR stunt, paid for by the U.S. military (we know who you are; we read the comments), what you need to know is that no matter who’s paying for it, those players really mean it. It’s the individual that really takes on the mantle of showing affection for U.S. troops.

To see appreciation in action, look no further than the 49ers’ George Kittle.


The 49ers’ tight end was the top passing target for San Francisco during the Veterans Day game on Monday night. The former Iowa Hawkeye had nine receptions for 83 yard in the 49ers’ loss to the Giants, but it was the reception he gave before the game that has fans talking.

The Nov. 12th game was played on the evening the United States observed Veterans Day and, as a result, was attended by dozens of uniformed servicemen and women from every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. The 49ers invited the troops to open the game.

At the end of the National Anthem and before the game’s kickoff, Kittle made his way to the sidelines to shake each of the visiting troops’ hands. The video of Kittle shaking hands went viral, but not because Kittle had a camera following him – there was no time for a photo op. That’s just the kind of guy he is.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Kittle and the 49ers led for much of Monday night’s game, outdone only in the last few minutes of the game, losing to the Eli Manning-led Giants 27-23.

“He’s got a good personality,” says 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan. “He acts like a WWE wrestler and I don’t think that’s an act; I think that’s who he is 24/7, which is fun to watch. But you’ve always got to watch out for him. He’s pretty rowdy all the time.”

Fellow players and staff describe Kittle as a “mild-mannered and respectful citizen” off the field. On the field, however, they call him a “scarlet-and-gold-clad superhero,” according to Bleacher Report.

This is not the 49ers’ first run-in with veterans this season. The team was one of a handful of teams who trained in the offseason with U.S. special operations veterans. San Francisco’s players, coaches, and scouts trained with a cadre of Navy SEAL veterans.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

During the first phase of the offseason program, 49ers players, coaches and members of the scouting staff participated in a rigorous (albeit familiar-looking) workout led by veteran Navy SEALs.

(49ers.com)

MIGHTY FIT

The honest truth about these trendy diets

This time of year, the subject of dieting is very popular with the promise of quick weight loss, but it’s important to carefully choose your weight-loss strategy. Doing so can help you can drop unwanted pounds safely and successfully — and boost your performance. The below info was provided by Ms. Carolyn Zisman, a nutritionist working at the Human Performance Resource Center.


Low-carb diets

Diets that are typically very low in carbs (less than five percent of calories or 50 grams daily) and high in fat (70–80 percent) can put you into ketosis. This means your body is producing ketones, which uses stored fat (instead of carbs) for energy. Aside from glucose from carbs, ketones from fat are the only fuel your brain can use. You might lose more weight on a moderate-protein, high-fat diet than a typical low-fat one.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Todd A. Schaffer)

Additionally, you can lower some risks for heart disease and type two diabetes. These diets also eliminate sugars and sweeteners, and they help you increase your intake of vegetables, omega three-rich seafood, nuts, and seeds. However, keto-type diets eliminate all grains, pastas, breads, beans, starchy vegetables, and nearly all fruit, which are critical sources of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Carb restriction also might lead to underfueling, hunger, fatigue, depression, irritability, constipation, headaches, and “brain fog,” which can affect your performance. Ketosis might make it harder to meet the extreme physical and mental challenges of your duties, too.

Keto-type diets are also tough to maintain because there are carbs in nearly all foods, including fruits, vegetables, legumes (beans, lentils, and peanuts), dairy products, and grains. Since your body needs to sustain ketosis for weight loss, it might be especially hard in environments with limited food options.

“Caveman” diets

High-protein, moderate-fat diets focus on foods that your hunter-gatherer ancestors ate, including fruits, vegetables, lean meats, fish, nuts and seeds. They’re also high in fiber and low in sodium and refined sugars. In addition, they’re generally healthy and not too hard to follow — whether you’re at home, the mess hall, or eating out.

Since these diets rely heavily on fresh food, it sometimes can take longer to plan meals. Fish and grass-fed meat can be expensive, too. Caveman-type diets also exclude entire food groups—such as whole grains, dairy, and legumes—and increase your risk for nutrient deficiencies. Also, there’s no difference in a high-protein, low-carb diet vs. a reduced-calorie diet for weight loss.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Vietnamese chefs teach Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) how to prepare local dishes.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tom Tonthat)

Carbs are your body’s preferred fuel source, and limiting them can lower your performance. While a low-carb diet is easier to do because you can eat carb-rich, starchy vegetables such as potatoes or squash, there might be times when this isn’t practical, especially if you’re on a mission with MREs or limited produce.

Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) essentially involves skipping meals for partial or full days (12–24 hours), severely restricting calories for several days in a row, or eating under 500 calories on two non-consecutive days.

While some research from animal studies shows that restricted eating might benefit longevity, there’s no evidence that it affects longevity in humans. However, those diagnosed with type two diabetes might be able to manage their blood sugar with IF. Fasting also can be effective with an average weight loss of 7–11 pounds over 10 weeks.

Still, IF can be hard for someone who needs to eat every few hours to sustain energy for physical and mental performance. Some will overeat on non-fasting days, so IF isn’t recommended for those with disordered eating or type one diabetes — or if you take medications that require food.

Weight loss comes down to energy balance: Eat less or move more to burn extra calories. In terms of performance, you need to eat more often to ensure you’re always sufficiently fueled, so fasting can be a challenge.

Cleansing or detoxification

“Detox” diets — also called “cleanses” or “flushes” — claim to help remove toxins from your body, leading to weight loss. Cleanses includes diets, supplements, drinks, laxatives, enemas, or a combination of these strategies.

Non-laxative cleanses or juice fasts can jump-start quick weight loss, but you still need to follow up with a proper approach that is realistic and sustainable. Since your calorie intake is very low on these particular days, it also can affect your physical performance.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Fort Monroe’s Staff Sgt. Joshua Spiess prepares a head of garlic while competing for the Armed Forces Chef of the Year.

(U.S. Army photo)

Detox-related weight loss is often only temporary and likely results from water loss. You also might gain weight when you resume normal eating. Extreme low-calorie diets can lower your body’s basal metabolic rate (the number of calories needed to perform basic, life-sustaining functions) as it struggles to preserve energy. Detox diets, which often require some fasting and severely limit protein, also can cause fatigue. They can result in vitamin, mineral, and other essential nutrient deficiencies in the long term, too. And the jury’s still out on whether detox diets actually remove toxins from your body. Depending on the ingredients used, detox diets also can cause cramping, bloating, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and dehydration, so they aren’t recommended for healthy and safe weight loss.

What’s the best way to lose weight and keep it off?

Quick weight loss (more than two pounds per week) can backfire in terms of health and weight maintenance. If you eat too little, your body might use muscle for fuel, instead of carbs (primary fuel) or fat (secondary fuel). Muscle burns more calories than stored fat, so losing muscle can actually slow your metabolism and ultimately make it harder to lose weight and keep it off.

The best approach is one that provides enough fuel — fruit, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, lean meat, fish, eggs, nuts, and healthy fats — to perform your duties and preserve muscle. Read HPRC’s “Warfighter Nutrition Guide” for tips to maintain your overall health and body weight.

For safe weight loss, make sure you are not causing harm and still have enough physical and mental strength to perform well. Work with your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian to create a healthy eating plan. You also want to make lifestyle changes that include exercise, so you can stay in warrior-athlete shape.

MIGHTY SPORTS

This is why cadets have shouted “Go Army! Beat Navy!” for over a century

The annual Army-Navy football game is intense. And though the players will be doing their best to out-maneuver and out-muscle the opposition, the competition extends well beyond the field. The fanbase of each service academy, which includes the troops and veterans of their respective branches, rally loudly behind their team with a single, unifying phrase: “Go Army! Beat Navy!” Or, for the sailors and Marines, “Go Navy! Beat Army!

As creative and ambitious as the smacktalk has become in recent years, the phrase never changes. And that’s because these rallying cries are nearly as old as the Army-Navy game itself.


Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Which I can only assume would cause confusion (and maybe a bit of jealousy) from the players of Notre Dame.

(Photo by Mike Strasser, West Point Public Affairs)

The tradition of military academy fans shouting out, “Go [us]! Beat [them]!” can be traced back to some of the earliest Army-Navy Games. It’s unclear which side started the tradition, but both teams were shouting their own versions of the simple phrase as early as second game, long before the sport of football became the mainstream cultural staple it is today.

Over the years, the phrase remained unchanged. The only variations come when a West Point or Naval Academy team faces off against the Air Force Academy or the Royal Military College of Canada. It doesn’t even matter if the team is facing off against a university unaffiliated with the Armed Forces — they’ll still add the “Beat Navy!” or “Beat Army!” to the end of their fight song.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Plebes who don’t follow this would presumably do push-ups and add “Beat Navy!” after each one.

(Photo by Mike Strasser, West Point Public Affairs)

The plebes (or freshmen) of each academy are also expected to be fiercely loyal to their football team at every possible occasion. At the drop of a hat, a plebe is expected to know how many days are left until the next Army-Navy Game. They’re also only allowed to say a handful of accepted phrases: “Yes, sir/ma’am,” “No, sir/ma’am,” and, of course, “Beat Navy/Army.”

Plebes are also expected to finish every sentence or greeting with a “Beat Navy” in the same way that an Army private adds “Hooah” to pretty much everything. It doesn’t matter if it’s an in-person meeting, e-mail, phone call, or text message. They better add “Beat Navy” to the end of whatever point they’re trying to make.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Go team! Beat the other team!

(West Point)

In the end, it’s still a friendly game between the two academies. They’re only truly rivals for the 60 minutes of game time. The phrase is all about mutual respect and should never get twisted. Years down the line, when the cadets become full-fledged officers, they’ll meet shoulder-to-shoulder on the battlefield and joke about the games later.

The rivalry is tough — but isn’t it always that way between two siblings?

MIGHTY CULTURE

An NFL player and West Pointer reenlisted troops before the Cardinals-Rams game

In the hours before the Arizona Cardinals kicked off against the Los Angeles Rams, an even more special thing happened in the Cardinals’ end zone. Unfortunately for the Cardinals, it was only one of two events that took place in their end zone all night. Arizona fell to Los Angeles 31-9, but 45 U.S. troops were sworn in or reenlisted that night.


You win some, you lose some.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?
West Point NFL player conducts mass oath of enlistment ceremony

But wait a minute. According to 10 U.S. Code § 502, the oath has to be administered by a commissioned officer. So who is swearing in these kids and troops? That’s 1st Lt. Brett Toth, who is a beneficiary of the recent rule changes to service academy athletes. Toth’s military service requirement was deferred in order to play offensive tackle for the Arizona Cardinals while he was in prime physical condition. Toth is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and a former player for the Army Black Knights football team. He played in two of Army’s most recent wins over Navy.

The group of 45 future soldiers and Marines gathered in front of him before the game’s kickoff were recruits from the Phoenix Recruiting Battalion and was part of the local Salute to Service celebration within the Cardinals franchise. The Cardinals, former home of a deceased Army ranger and former Cardinal Pat Tillman, are very excited to celebrate Salute to Service every November. It doesn’t hurt to have an actual lieutenant on hand, either.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

(U.S. Army photo by Alun Thomas)

As Toth, who is currently on the team’s disabled list, led the mass Oath of Enlistment, the crowd began to cheer wildly. After taking the oath, the 45 newly-christened U.S. troops were able to stay for the game. When the Cardinals took the field, the first people out of the locker room were Capt. Edward Donaghue, commander of the Phoenix Recruiting Battalion, and Staff Sgt. Gregory Hunter, one of the battalion’s recruiters.

Though the game started on a very high note for the Cardinals players and for America’s newest troops, it didn’t take long to turn for the worst. The Cardinals were soundly defeated in a 31-9 loss to the Rams.

MIGHTY SPORTS

Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 2

Welcome to the Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 2, where QB injuries dominated every storyline. This week: Big Ben, Brees, Sam Darnold, and then Trevor Siemian, all incurred massive season-changing injuries. What does that mean for your roster? Well, if you have any of those dudes… It means “not good.”


DMac’s INT was a great example of team defense by the #Patriots. Cover-1 man. Van Noy throws heavy hands to open the inside rush lane to put pressure on Fitzpatrick, Gilmore undercuts the route and makes a terrific deflection and McCourty is in perfect position to catch the tip.pic.twitter.com/Nd3s5R7SuV

twitter.com

Blue chip medal

Dak Prescott, QB, Cowboys- Welp, that annoying dude from work is right for the first time in a decade. The Cowboys actually are back this year. That’s in major thanks to Dak’s incredible display. Dak threatens defenses with his legs and arm, and has massively improved as a downfield passer this year. The Cowboys are 2-0 and Dak is in clear QB1 territory.

Dalvin Cook, RB, Vikings- Regardless of how successful the Vikings are on Sundays, one thing is clear—their offense plays through Dalvin Cook. And Cook gets results. He slashes defenses with long runs, guts them with pass-catching out of the backfield, and he’s doing it all with an average line and Kirk Cousins. A true RB1.

Patriots Defense- The Pats defense came to play the first two weeks of the season. Over the last two decades, the Patriots have offensively dominated the NFL, but this is the first year where it seems like the scariest part of their team is the defense. They scored 37 fantasy points against Miami. They’ve only allowed 3 points through 8 quarters of football. They are the real deal. Ugh.

Travis Kelce, TE, Chiefs- Perhaps the safest player in fantasy football, Kelce is a walking stat machine. He’s a match-up nightmare on one of the highest-powered offenses in the NFL. He scores week in and week out. And for now, he’s not competing with Tyreek Hill for targets.

Cam Newton this entire gamepic.twitter.com/6LTQGuv00M

twitter.com

Loss of rank

Cam Newton, QB, Panthers- Cam looked dejected against a floppy Bucs defense Thursday. He’s not using his legs to make plays. He overthrew players constantly. Now he’s got a banged-up foot and is questionable to play Sunday. If you have Cam, try shipping him, it’s looking like former MVP may end up on the waiver wire come the bye week.

Jordan Howard, RB, Eagles- Jordan Howard has yet to produce in an Eagles offense that is stuck in purgatory. Miles Sanders is clearly the guy in the backfield of this offense. Although Howard has been at the top of the rushing charts the last five years, this seems to be a massive step back from his time in Chicago.

Dede Westbrook, WR, Jaguars- The appeal to Westbrook was his chemistry with Nick Foles. With Foles out, his role has diminished quickly. Unless he can get on the same page with the Uncle-Rico-looking-heart-throb rookie Gardner Minshew, his upside may suffer drastically.

Duke Johnson, RB, Texans- When Lamar Miller went down for the year with a torn ACL, it looked like an opportunity for massive production from the former Browns RB. Then they signed Carlos Hyde. And Hyde has been enjoying a renaissance of sorts, while Duke Johnson struggles to get any momentum going. This is an interesting offense, especially when Watson is clicking, so all is not lost with Johnson yet—but his fantasy pulse is low and needs to be monitored.


44-yard touchdown to Demarcus Robinson #KCvsOAK | : KCTV5pic.twitter.com/Sk9WZdEph8

twitter.com

Promotion watch

Demarcus Robinson, WR, Chiefs- Robinson absolutely exploded week two against the Raiders. He posted a ridiculous six catches for 172 yards and two touchdowns. He’s a threat to post these kinds of boom-or-bust numbers as long as Tyreek Hill is out.

Mecole Hardman, WR, Chiefs-Robinson ain’t alone. Hardman also had a stellar game and seemed to share the massively efficient passing attention of Patrick Mahomes. The Chiefs score points, and these guys benefit from that. Try to get either guy on the waiver wire if you can.

Devin Singletary, RB, Bills- Singletary posted a solid ~15 point fantasy week, however, the most promising takeaway from this situation is how good the Bills look. They’re 2-0. Josh Allen is slinging the rock. The defense looks stout. The more games that the Bills are ahead, the more times they’re going to run out the clock by giving Singletary the ball. Trade for him if you can.

Teddy Bridgewater, QB, Saints- Brees is out for 6-8 weeks. So it looks like the Saints are going to turn to the young, eager Teddy Bridgewater for their quarterbacking duties. Bridgewater is stepping into one of the most prolific offenses in the NFL today. He’s got Kamara, Latavius Murray, Michael Thomas, Jared Cook, and many others. He could easily put up QB1 numbers if this waiver wire gamble pays off.

Jake Matthews squashed Avonte Maddox.pic.twitter.com/numxJIrNW1

twitter.com

Badass hit of the week

Jake Matthews

Once again, the Badass Hit of the Week goes to an offensive lineman. What can we say—we got a soft spot for the unsung big guys. It’s not without merit; this massive hit opened a lane for Julio Jones to stride 60 yards for the game-winning touchdown.

MIGHTY FIT

Those ‘core’ exercises in military PT tests don’t actually prove anything about your fitness

Preparing for the abs portion of your PT test might trick you into thinking you have a six pack, but those workouts are potentially getting you into worse shape. Stop taking ab selfies in the gym mirror and listen up.


“Core exercises” are a part of every service’s PT test, whether it’s crunches, sit-ups, or what the Navy inexplicably calls, “curls-ups.”

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

This is a curl-up… right?

If you’ve carefully read the procedural guidelines for your service’s PT test, you already know how easy it is to cheat on these ab exercises. Or maybe you’re just really bad at counting…

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

…8, 9, 10, 17, 18, 36, 74… Teamwork at its finest.

Even if you’re not a cheater, the abdominal portion of the PT test is still only testing your ability to do that one hyper-specific movement, not your overall core strength. Strength is specific to how you train, and how you train should be specific to what you do (you know, like your job). What job in the military are any of these exercises specific to? Those crunches will make you able to sh*t really fast and keep your breaks short and your NCO happy, but it won’t make you stronger.

The Navy PRT guidelines state that, “the curl-up, when performed properly, can help develop abdominal strength and endurance, which are important factors in preventing low-back injuries.”

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Nice view, okay smell…

While ab strength definitely protects the spine, the curl-up is far from targeting the actual core muscles needed for that job. The abdominals have many functions, and only one of them is flexion of the spine.

Flexion: that’s the one where you flex your abs, and your spine makes the same shape as Gollum’s.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

That’s right — stretch it out.

The other functions of the abs include but are not limited to, breathing, coughing, sneezing, stabilizing, and maintaining posture.

You have four main groups of abdominals:

  1. Internal obliques help with breathing, rotation, and side bending.
  2. External obliques help pull the chest downward to increase pressure in your abdomen, which is important for the Valsalva maneuver. Divers, pilots, and people who move heavy weight couldn’t survive without them.
  3. The transverse abdominis is the deep, corset-like muscle that provides stability and postural support for the spine. Without it, you would rupture a spinal disk every time you farted.
  4. The rectus abdominis is the sexy one. The rectus abdominis’ primary function is to flex your trunk. It also happens to be the only one really tested in any PT test.

An exercise program that only tests one function of the abs leaves a huge gap in both knowledge and functionality for both you and your service of choice.

Judging from your PT scores alone, no one can tell if your body is actually structurally sound. So, the next time you go to dig a fighting hole, load a torpedo, or crank a wrench may just be the time that your weak back and tight rectus abdominis conspire against your spine, even if you scored among the best.

In order to have full spinal protection, you need to ensure you are working all the muscles of your core, from front to back. That includes the erector spinae. These are the muscles that are growing weak while you crunch your way to some non-specific lower back pain.

Having a strong rectus abdominis and weak erector spinae creates the kind of postural imbalance that causes back pain and loss of mobility and, as a service member, if you can’t hold up your body, you’re about as useful as a poopy-flavored lollipop.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

Tasty…

Since you only have to do curl-ups for your PT test, why bother ensuring your low back muscles are equally as strong as your abs? Having a strong lower back isn’t going to get you promoted faster. But low back pain is the most common type of pain in existence today. 84% of humans have reported that, at one point in their life, they experienced back pain of some kind.

The military is not exempt from this statistic. I’ve known 19-year-old LCpls with “chronic” back pain. This type of highly preventable injury crushes combat readiness.

“Hey, Devildog! Get up! We still have 6 klicks to the objective!”
“I can’t Sergeant, my L3 is throbbing! I have chronic back pain.”
“Didn’t you get a 300 on your PFT? You’re supposed to be in shape!”

So, following the clues, not only does the PT test not prove that you can function adequately to conduct your job, it inadvertently causes you to injure your back by becoming hyper-focused on your front.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

This takes REAL core strength.

Try these “core exercises” instead: squats, deadlifts, lunges, and farmers’ carries. These exercises load your core the way it is designed to work: with all core and back muscles engaged equally and totally.

Does “performance beer” actually help with recovery?

https://www.composurefitness.com/gamp1/

Do Not Sell My Personal Information