Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY CULTURE

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Message from the top

On March 18, 2020, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein emphasized the importance of protecting the force from COVID-19 while maintaining the ability to conduct global missions.

“We’ve got fighters, bombers, and maintainers deployed working to keep America safe,” Goldfein said during a briefing with reporters at the Pentagon. “We’re still flying global mobility missions and conducting global space operations. So, the global missions we as an Air Force support in the joint force, all those missions continue.”

As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, the U.S. Air Force’s core missions remain unimpeded.


COVID-19 response

Air Mobility Command continued rapid global mobility operations on March 17, when U.S. Airmen transported a shipment of 500,000 COVID-19 testing swabs from Aviano Air Base, Italy, to Memphis, Tennessee. The mission, which was headed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, utilized Air Force active duty, Reserve and National Guard components to ensure timely delivery of the supplies.

To aid the Italian response to the COVID-19 outbreak, a Ramstein Air Base C-130J Super Hercules delivered a life-saving medical capability, the En-Route Patient Staging System, to the Italian Ministry of Defense. The vital medical capability was transported to Aviano AB via an 86th Airlift Wing C-130J Super Hercules out of Ramstein AB, Germany, on March 20.

The ERPSS is a flexible, modular patient staging system able to operate across a spectrum of scenarios such as humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations. The modular system provides 10 patient staging beds inside two tents, can support up to 40 patients in 24 hours, comes with seven days of medical supplies and can achieve initial operating capability within one hour of notification.

Also, at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, Airmen assigned to the 56th Medical Group helped minimize the spread of COVID-19 by staffing a drive-thru COVID-19 testing station on March 23.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Airmen assigned to the 56th Medical Group conduct COVID-19 tests March 23, 2020, at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. To minimize the spread of COVID-19, the 56th MDG is utilizing drive-thru services to conduct tests. The 56th MDG is following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and working closely with Arizona health officials to decrease the impact of COVID-19 at Luke AFB.

U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO // SENIOR AIRMAN ALEXANDER COOK

National Guard Soldiers and Airmen are being called upon to assist state and local governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In New York, guardsmen are providing logistical and administrative support to state and local governments, staffing two call centers, assisting three drive-thru COVID-19 testing stations, cleaning public buildings, warehousing and delivering bulk supplies of New York State sanitizer to local governments and helping schools deliver meals to students at home.

The New Jersey National Guard also assisted a COVID-19 Community Based Testing Site at the PNC Bank Arts Center in Holmdel, New Jersey, March 23, 2020. The testing site, which was established in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, was staffed by the New Jersey Department of Health, New Jersey State Police, and New Jersey National Guard.

Strengthening joint partnerships

The Air Force’s European Bomber Task Force regularly deploys bomber aircraft to the European theater of operations to conduct joint training with allied nations. The task force continues to train with U.S. partners to strengthen relationships and ensure the sovereignty of allied airspace.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Trevon Gardner, assigned to the 5th Security Forces Squadron at Minot Air Base, North Dakota, poses for a portrait in front of a B-2 Spirit on March 19, 2020, at RAF Fairford, United Kingdom. Gardner deployed to RAF Fairford in support of Bomber Task Force Europe operations, which tests the readiness of the Airmen and equipment that support it, as well as their collective ability to operate at forward locations.

U.S. AIR NATIONAL GUARD PHOTO // TECH. SGT. COLTON ELLIOTT

One example of the task force’s continued operations tempo is the recent Icelandic Air Policing mission conducted March 16. The mission involved two U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit aircraft from RAF Fairford, United Kingdom, as well as Norwegian F-35 Lightning IIs and U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle aircraft.

The Bomber Task Force achieved a new milestone over the North Sea on March 18, when two U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit stealth bombers successfully conducted a fifth generation integration flight with Norwegian and Dutch F-35 Lightning IIs.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

A B-2A Spirit bomber assigned to the 509th Bomb Wing, Royal Netherlands air force F-35A and U.S. F-15C Eagle assigned to the 48th Fighter Wing conduct aerial operations in support of Bomber Task Force Europe 20-2 over the North Sea March 18, 2020. Bomber missions provide opportunities to train and work with NATO allies and theater partners in combined and joint operations and exercises.

U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO // MASTER SGT. MATTHEW PLEW

“The world expects that NATO and the U.S. continue to execute our mission with decisiveness, regardless of any external challenge,” said Gen. Jeff Harrigian, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa commander. “Missions like these provide us an opportunity to assure our allies while sending a clear message to any adversary that no matter the challenge, we are ready.”

Sustaining the training pipeline

A formal memorandum released by Air Education and Training Command on March 18 detailed the command’s designation as a mission essential function of the U.S. Air Force during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Donald Weaver, 320th Training Squadron military training instructor, leads his flight with a salute during an Air Force BMT graduation Mar. 19, 2020, held at the 320th Training Squadron’s Airman Training Complex on Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Due to current world events, the 37th Training Wing has implemented social distancing by graduating 668 Airmen during four different ceremonies at different Airman Training Complexes. The graduation ceremonies will be closed to the public until further notice for the safety and security of the newly accessioned Airmen and their family members due to coronavirus (COVID-19).

U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO

Lt. Gen. Brad Webb, commander of AETC, stated that the command will continue to “recruit and access Airmen; train candidates and enlistees in Officer Training School, ROTC and basic military training; develop Airmen in technical and flying training; and deliver advanced academic education such as the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, Air Command and Staff College and Air War College.”

Prior to attending basic military training, potential recruits are required to undergo processing at a Military Entrance Processing Station. MEPS members have virus protocol procedures to observe and take the temperatures of all individuals entering MEPS facilities. Additionally, Air Force recruiters complete a medical prescreen of all applicants which covers all medical concerns including COVID-19.

Although they may be a little quieter, Air Force Basic Military Training graduations will continue to press on at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Graduation ceremonies have been closed to the public until further notice while social distancing procedures have been implemented to further protect the health and safety of Airmen.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

U.S. Air Force basic military training graduates stand at attention during an Air Force BMT graduation Mar. 19, 2020, held at the 320th Training Squadron’s Airman Training Complex on Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Due to current world events, the 37th Training Wing has implemented social distancing by graduating 668 Airmen during four different ceremonies at different Airman Training Complexes. The graduation ceremonies will be closed to the public until further notice for the safety and security of the newly accessioned Airmen and their family members due to coronavirus (COVID-19).

U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO

On March 19, the 37th Training Wing implemented social distancing procedures by graduating 668 Airmen using four separate ceremonies at four different Airman Training Complexes. Although the events were closed to the public, provisions were made to live stream the Air Force graduation ceremonies through the USAF Basic Military Training Facebook page.

Remaining ready on the homefront

To prevent the spread of viruses, the Air Force is urging its personnel and their families to continue practicing proper hygiene. This includes washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Also, avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands and avoid close contact with those who are sick. Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces should also be done for good measure.

For the Airmen on the flight line, social distancing procedures are rigorously enforced. Additionally, aircrews are having their temperatures taken to ensure aircraft maintain a clean environment that’s safe for their fellow Airmen.

For the latest and most reliable information regarding COVID-19, visit https://www.af.mil/News/Coronavirus-Disease-2019/.

This article originally appeared on Airman Magazine. Follow @AirmanMagazine on Twitter.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Migrant children in the US might be moved to military bases

The Trump administration is considering housing up to 20,000 unaccompanied migrant children on military bases in coming months, according to lawmakers and a Defense Department memo obtained by The Washington Post.

In a notification to lawmakers, the Pentagon said that officials at the Department of Health and Human Services asked whether beds could be provided for children at military installations “for occupancy as early as July through Dec. 31, 2018.”

Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) addressed the issue on the Senate floor on June 21, 2018.


“The Department of Defense has been asked whether it can house 20,000 unaccompanied children between now and the end of the year,” he said. “How will that work? Is it even feasible?”

The plan would seemingly have similarities to 2014, when the Obama administration housed about 7,000 unaccompanied children on three military bases. The Pentagon, in its congressional notification to lawmakers, said it must determine if it “possesses these capabilities.” As required under the Economy Act, the memo said, the Defense Department would be reimbursed for all costs incurred.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
President Donald Trump

The sites would be run by HHS employees or contractors working with them, the memo said. They would provide care to the children, “including supervision, meals, clothing, medical services, transportation or other daily needs,” and HHS representatives will be at each location.

The memo was sent to lawmakers on June 20, 2018, after President Trump reversed his administration’s unpopular policy to separate children from their parents as the migrants arrived at the southern U.S. border.

The president’s executive order directed Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to “take all legally available measures” to provide Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen with “any existing facilities available for the housing and care of alien families,” and the construction of new facilities “if necessary and consistent with law.”

Read the rest of the Washington Post story here

This article originally appeared on Military Spouse. Follow @MilSpouseMag on Twitter.

Articles

US Navy destroyer’s crew caught in bizarre gambling and fireworks scandal

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
The guided-missile destroyer USS Bainbridge (DDG 96) is assisted by a tug boat as it pulls away from the pier at Naval Station Norfolk. (Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Amber O’Donovan)


An investigation into events that led to the reliefs of the commanding officer, former executive officer and command master chief of the guided missile destroyer USS Bainbridge earlier this month implicated 15 other officers and senior leaders on the ship in the scandal.

Cmdr. Sean Rongers, Cmdr. Brandon Murray, and Command Master Chief Richard Holmes, were relieved April 7 by Destroyer Squadron 28 commander Capt. Richard Brawley after an investigation found fireworks were being stored aboard the Bainbridge in violation of Navy instructions and unlawful gambling was taking place among officers, officials said.

A 149-page preliminary inquiry report released to Military.com through a Freedom of Information Act request found the ship’s leaders also failed to get a pregnant officer transferred off the ship in keeping with Navy policy, conducted certain ship maneuvers that endangered gear, and encouraged relaxed uniform guidelines under long underway periods with the sale of “no-shave chits.”

A command climate survey also obtained by Military.com dating from February also found that the ship’s top officers presided over a command marked by exeptionally poor trust in leadership and leadership and organizational cohesion.

According to the February investigation, Rongers, the commanding officer, directed the purchase of just under $1,500 worth of fireworks for a July 4 display aboard the Bainbridge, using funds from the ship’s morale, welfare and recreation account. In April 2015, Rongers directed a subordinate to purchase the fireworks, knowing that the ship had conducted a similar fireworks display in 2013.

The subordinate, whose name is redacted in the report, negotiated a deal with the company Phantom Fireworks to buy the pyrotechnics. An overnight trip was made to purchase the goods, which included fireworks with names like “The Beast Unleashed” and “Swashbuckler 72-shot.”

Some of the fireworks purchased were not available for sale in Virginia, the investigation shows. Then, while the ship was operating in the Virginia Capes area, near Virginia Beach, Rongers dispatched rigid-hulled inflatable boats to pick the fireworks up at Rudee Inlet in a late-night operation.

Rongers told investigators that the fireworks were brought aboard via late-night boat operations in order to avoid force protection measures or other regulations that might have prohibited them coming through the main gate when the ship was pierside in Norfolk, Virginia. He also said he checked with another officer about the legality of using MWR funds for fireworks and got the all-clear. The officer, whose name is redacted in the investigation, denied that Rongers had checked with her.

The fireworks were stored in black trash bags in the ship’s pyro locker, near its barbershop. Ultimately, however, officials from Destroyer Squadron 28 got wind of the fireworks plan when a prospective weapons officer from the Bainbridge raised concerns, saying he had already confronted Rongers and Murray, the executive officer about having them stored aboard ship.

Rongers had the fireworks removed from the ship and loaded into his own car. The MWR funds used to purchase them were never reimbursed, however.

Investigators found that Rongers and Murray failed to do the research needed to ensure the fireworks purchase and display were legal. They violated MWR policy prohibiting funds from being used to pay for “hazardous activities,” according to the report, and Rongers “rationalized” his actions because a fireworks display had taken place before, even though Navy policy prohibits fireworks being stored aboard ship and transported the way that they were.

Rongers did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Military.com.

The gambling accusations stem from a weekly Friday night officers’ poker game that took place in the Bainbridge officers’ wardroom with Rongers and Murray’s consent and participation during the ship’s 2015 deployment. There was a $10 buy-in, and participants played with chips in lieu of money and kept scores and money owed written on a piece of paper.

Concerns arose after an officer was asked to pay a buy-in fee she claimed she was never informed about. A legal officer approached Rongers and Murray with doubts about the legality of the command-sanctioned game, according to the report, but they dismissed these concerns, saying no one was forced to play.

Ultimately, the game was temporarily closed down and replaced by a non-gambling game night with activities like Uno and Risk. However, the game started up again later in the deployment, investigators found.

The investigation also revealed a booming business: the purchase of “no-shave chits” which allowed Navy personnel to grow facial hair or, if female, to wear their hair in a ponytail during long periods underway. At $30 a pop, the MWR raised nearly $12,700 on a single deployment from sale of the chits, the investigation found. The ship’s leaders sanctioned this practice, and Rongers even purchased a chit at one point, documents show. While the practice of selling the chits is fairly common, investigators found, it is not permitted by policy.

Bainbridge leadership also fell afoul of policy when an officer became pregnant. Though regulations stipulate that pregnant sailors need to be transferred off-ship by the 20th week of pregnancy, she was not transferred until some five weeks after that deadline, even though the report shows she repeatedly brought the matter to the attention of her chain of command. Moreover, Murray waited until January 2016 — past the pregnancy’s 20-week point — to inform the ship’s placement officer of the need to transfer the officer, even though he was aware of the situation in November, the investigation found.

Finally, Rongers’ handling of the Bainbridge on breakaways following underway replenishment caused alarm among sailors and led to the loss of some gear, the investigation found. On multiple occasions, witnesses testified, Rongers would conduct the breakaways at high speed, before personnel and gear were secured. In one case, sailors ordered to clear the deck could hear items tumbling around as the ship broke away. Two aluminum drip pans were lost over the course of the deployment, and one “killer tomato” or inflatable naval gunnery target, was struck loose by the wind, but was ultimately recovered.

Investigators faulted many other officers for failing to take appropriate action in light of the improper behavior taking place aboard the Bainbridge. While Rongers and Murray were advised they were suspected of violating articles 92 and 133 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, violation of a general order and conduct unbecoming of an officer and gentleman, respectively, 16 others were cited on suspicion of dereliction of duty or violation of a general order.

These include the ship’s chief engineer, the supply corps officer, the weapons officer, the force protection officer, the recreational services officer, the Tomahawk leading chief petty officer and others, though the names of these individuals were redacted.

Investigators recommended that Rongers face non-judicial punishment for directing a subordinate to illegally transport and store fireworks. They also recommended that the ship’s chief petty officers ensure sailors are taught lessons on “misplaced loyalty” with regards to the fireworks incident, since many aboard ship were found to have covered for leadership, rather than adhered to policy.

While the investigation does not cover how problems with the ship’s command affected the rank-and-file, a command climate survey from the time reveals troubling trends. Fifty-three percent of sailors on the Bainbridge rated their trust in leadership unfavorably, according to the survey. On leadership cohesion, 63 percent of sailors gave unfavorable ratings, and 47 percent of sailors rated organizational cohesion unfavorably. Organizational processes received a 52 percent unfavorable rating, and 42 percent of sailors rated their job satisfaction unfavorably.

A spokesman for Naval Surface Force Atlantic, Lt. Cmdr. Myers Vasquez, said Rongers, Murray and Holmes remain assigned to SURFLANT in Norfolk. Vasquez said the administrative process was still ongoing for the sailors named in the investigation and declined further comment.

Articles

Medal Of Honor Hero Kyle Carpenter Just Gave An Inspiring Speech That Everyone Should Read

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic


Former Marine Cpl. Kyle Carpenter gave a powerful speech to his fellow veterans of the Battle of Marjah recently that everyone should take the time to read.

Also Read: 4 Reasons Why Going To War Gives Veterans An Edge Over Their Civilian Peers 

Carpenter, who received the Medal of Honor last year for jumping on a grenade to save his friend’s life during the battle, told his fellow Marines that “it’s your medal” at a reunion on the five-year anniversary of Operation Moshtarak last week at the National Museum of the Marine Corps.

“With this short amount of time I have to speak to you tonight, I couldn’t possibly sum up the historical battle of Marjah,” Carpenter said in his speech, according to a transcription from Hope Hodge Seck of Marine Corps Times. “I am comforted, though, by the fact that the men in this room don’t need a summary because you were right there beside me. You felt the incredible heat of a 100 percent humidity day and the cool waters of a muddy canal. You felt the weight of 100 pounds of gear, ammo and water at your back, the weight of knowing as Marines we are and forever will be the first line of defense for our loved ones, our nation and above all, freedom.”

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Kyle Carpenter and Nick Eufrazio

The Battle of Marjah involved 15,000 American, Afghan, Canadian, British, and French troops in the largest joint operation up to that point in the Afghan war. The effort to wrestle the key town of Marjah from the Taliban took NATO forces nearly 10 months, according to ABC News.

“I stand here today extremely proud of you all. I’m proud of the job you did in the face of what most cannot even fathom. I am more than honored to call you friends, fellow Marines and brothers,” Carpenter said. “You stand as an example for others and for what’s best for not only our nation but the rest of the world.”

In his speech, Carpenter did not reference his incredible example from Nov. 21, 2010, when he jumped on a grenade while providing rooftop security at a small outpost. “I only remember a few moments after I got hit,” Carpenter told me previously when I interviewed him for Business Insider. “But nothing before.”

He was severely wounded — as was his friend Lance Cpl. Nick Eufrazio — but both survived. While Carpenter lost his right eye and took shrapnel throughout his face and lower body, his recovery has been nothing short of remarkable.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Photo: The White House

Carpenter continued (via Marine Times):

Be proud of who you are. Be proud of what you did in that country. You are alive today and have been blessed with this opportunity of life. Don’t waste it. Live a life worth living, full of meaning and purpose, and one that will make the fallen who are looking down on us proud.

Marines, I’m proud to have worn the same uniform as you.

Never forget that when no one else would raise their right hand, you did. You sacrificed and became part of our nation’s history and our Marine Corps legacy for taking part in the historical battleground of Marjah. Thank you so much. I really do appreciate it.

Marine Corps Times has the full speech. It’s definitely worth a read.

NOW: This Hero Saved Six Soldiers From A Burning Vehicle While He Was Drenched In Fuel 

OR: 10 Photos That Capture The Military Experience 

MIGHTY TRENDING

The new ‘unlimited range’ missile just embarrassed the Russian military

A Russian cruise missile that the country touted as having “practically unlimited” range appears to be falling short, sources with knowledge of a US intelligence report told CNBC.

The cruise missile, which Russian President Vladimir Putin unveiled at a Russian Federal Assembly in March 2018, only flew for around two minutes and traveled 22 miles before it lost control and crashed, CNBC reported May 21, 2018. Another missile test reportedly lasted just four seconds with a distance of five miles.


Russia tested the missile four times between November 2017, and February 2018, at the behest of senior officials, even though engineers voiced doubt over the program, according to CNBC’s sources.

Putin previously touted a new generation of weapons in a presentation that displayed missile trajectories going from Russia to the US. In addition to the cruise missile, Putin teased unmanned underwater drones purportedly capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, and a hypersonic glide vehicle.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
graphic showingu00a0an ICBM payload in space.

“I want to tell all those who have fueled the arms race over the last 15 years, sought to win unilateral advantages over Russia, introduced unlawful sanctions aimed to contain our country’s development: All what you wanted to impede with your policies have already happened,” Putin said in a speech. “You have failed to contain Russia.”

Russia’s cruise missile capabilities may have missed the mark, but sources said it succeeded in other aspects. The hypersonic glide vehicle, which is believed to be able to travel five times the speed of sound, would render US countermeasures useless and could become operational by 2020, according to CNBC.

“We don’t have any defense that could deny the employment of such a weapon against us,” US Air Force General John Hyten, the commander of US Strategic Command, said at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing in March 2018.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Army Recruiting Command honors D-Day in Hollywood

“It’s important that we honor those that gave all. It’s important that we honor those who came before us. They are the reason we have a future. They are the reason why we flourish. We owe our life and the pursuit of happiness to that Greatest Generation,” shared Command Sergeant Major Gavia at American Legion Hollywood Post 43.

On June 6, 1944, over 156,000 Allied troops invaded Normandy France from the air and the sea. The scale of the assault was unlike anything mankind had ever attempted — and through great effort and great sacrifice, it would turn the tide of the war against Nazi Germany.

On June 6, 2019, the United States Army Recruiting Command invited veterans to Post 43 to honor the 75th anniversary of the attack.


Top 10 Most Intense Battles in US History

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The event included a guest speaker, a screening of The Longest Day, and a very lively World War II veteran who served with General George S. Patton.

“It’s important to remember events like this because the generation that is coming up will be expected to accomplish the same sort of things so the more they can connect and meet some of the veterans while they’re still around to tell their stories,” U.S. Army Lt. Col. Flood shared with We Are The Mighty’s August Dannehl, a Navy veteran.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Jimmy Weldon, a World War II veteran in the audience speaks with We Are the Mighty team bout D-Day and Gen. Patton

The U.S. Army Recruiting Command chose the right venue for the event. American Legion Hollywood Post 43 is making strides toward bring veterans from all wars together. While the American Legion has traditionally been populated by older generations of vets, Post 43 has exceptionally high numbers of Post-9/11 service members in its midst.

Events such as these allow Post-9/11 veterans to talk with the heroes from ‘the greatest generation’ and hear their incredible stories firsthand.

After all, it’s not every day you meet someone who actually served with Patton himself.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Up late? 5 ways service members stay awake when the going gets tough

Exhaustion is the great equalizer. There comes a point for everyone when your body demands sleep, and if you aren’t willing to give it what it wants, things start to get rough. It doesn’t matter if you’re a soldier on post in a combat zone or a new mom trying to make it through the day after a sleepless night of diaper changes and bottle-boiling, the sandman comes for us all.

If you’re desperate for sleep, the best thing you can do is rack out and get some. If that’s not an option, however, here are some of the ways service members stay alert long after exhaustion has set in. They’re not always the healthiest options, but hey, if we were that worried about our health, we’d be getting some rest.


Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Instant coffee works best when you can chew it.

Caffeine

Ah, caffeine–the old standby. Whenever anyone’s tired, the first thing they think to do is pour themselves a nice hot cup of joe. Of course, in the field, that’s not always an option, but there are plenty of other ways to get your fix. Aside from the service-member favorite energy drinks, the most common field-sources of caffeine come in MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). Some even now come with sticks of caffeinated gum.

If you’ve got the time and the hot water, the small packets of instant coffee that come in MREs can make for a passable cup, but plenty of guys simply pour the pouches into their lips like a pinch of chewing tobacco. Might not be delicious, but it’ll help keep you up. Of course, too much caffeine poses a number of problems, including dehydration and nausea, so there are limits to what a lipper of coffee can do for you.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Nicotine

Not just for smoke breaks, nicotine can also go far in helping to keep you conscious and alert during long nights on post or in the campus library. A lot of service members pick up cigarette or chewing tobacco habits during their time in uniform, in part because it offers something to do during long stretches of downtime, and in part because of the kick of energy you can get from a properly timed smoke break.

Of course, nicotine comes with a whole host of negative side effects, so choose your weapons wisely when waging war against your own exhaustion.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Debate

Many service members stumble across this tactic on post: you and another person are stuck in one place for a while with nothing to do but look at the horizon, so you spark up a bit of conversation. Before you know it, you’re arguing about whether or not Darkwing Duck was a better show than Duck Tales and you’ve both managed to kill two hours of your shift… so powerful is the magic of useless debate.

It’s important not to let friendly debate boil over into a full-fledged fight, however, which can be a real challenge sometimes when you’re operating on little sleep.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

Get physical

Long after caffeine has failed you and nicotine is just giving you the shakes, there’s one more thing you can do to help you overcome the heaviest of eyelids: get up and get moving. Something as simple as hopping off your chair for a set of push-ups can get your blood pumping again. Go for a walk around the office or your house, karate chop some old boards in your garage, or haze yourself with a few sets of burpees.

And as an added bonus, you can meet the criteria for “getting physical” by getting into a fist fight with your buddy once your Ducktales debate gets out of hand.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

When your friends are counting on you, you do what you’ve got to do.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar)

Just ride it out

Eventually, if you ride out your exhaustion well into the next day, some of the worse symptoms will begin to subside. You’ll feel strange, hazy, and detached… but conscious nonetheless. The human body is capable of playing dirty to get you to do the things you need to do (like sleep), but it’s also good at letting you stay in the fight when it becomes clear the things you need to do aren’t in the cards.

Just like hunger pains will subside after a time, so too will the horrible weight of exhaustion… at least, for a few hours. Once that second wind subsides, you’ll be hurting worse than ever. Hopefully, you’ll have a chance to rack out by then.

MIGHTY TRENDING

NATO chief expects the nukes to stay where they are

NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg says European members of the military alliance are unlikely to deploy new nuclear weapons on their soil in response to an alleged violation of a treaty between Washington and Moscow that bans medium-range missiles.

Speaking four days after U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the United States will withdraw from the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, Stoltenberg said on Octo. 24, 2018, that NATO is assessing the security implications of the alleged Russian breach.

“We will, of course, assess the implications for NATO allies for our security of the new Russian missiles and the Russian behavior,” Stoltenberg said. “But I don’t foresee that [NATO] allies will station more nuclear weapons in Europe as a response to the new Russian missile.”


The INF treaty prohibits the United States and Russia from possessing, producing, or deploying ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with a range of between 500 kilometers and 5,500 kilometers.

Nearly 2,700 missiles were eliminated by the Soviet Union and the United States — most of the latter in Europe — under the treaty.Trump said on Oct. 20, 2018, that the United States will pull out of the treaty.

He and White House national-security adviser John Bolton, who met with Russian President Vladimir Putin and other top officials in Moscow on Oct. 22-23, 2018, cited U.S. concerns about what NATO allies say is a Russian missile that violates the pact and about weapons development by China, which is not a party to the treaty.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

White House national-security adviser John Bolton.

European governments including those of NATO members France and Germany have voiced concern about Trump’s stated intention to withdraw from the INF, as has the European Union. Bolton said in Moscow that the United States has not yet made any decision to deploy missiles in Europe targeting Moscow.

Stoltenberg said that the INF is “a landmark treaty, but the problem is that no treaty can be effective — can work — if it’s only respected by one party.”

“All [NATO] allies agree that the United States is in full compliance…. The problem is Russian behavior,” he said.

He also expressed hope that Russia and the United States will agree to extend New START, a treaty that restricts long-range nuclear weapons and is due to expire in 2021.

Russia, meanwhile, repeated its criticism of the U.S. plan to withdraw from the INF.

Trump has suggested that the United States will develop missiles that the treaty prohibited once it withdraws, saying when he first announced the planned pullout: “We’ll have to develop those weapons, unless Russia comes to us and China comes to us and they all come to us and say, ‘Let’s really get smart and let’s none of us develop those weapons.'”

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

President Donald J. Trump.

That is “an extremely dangerous intention,” Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters on a conference call on Oct. 24, 2018.

Peskov also said that the Kremlin is “undoubtedly ready” to discuss the possibility of a summit in Washington in 2019 between Putin and Trump, but that there was “no concrete decision on this.”

Bolton has suggested that Trump and Putin, who held their first full-fledged summit in July 2018 in Helsinki, could have another such meeting in the foreseeable future.

In the meantime, Peskov said the Kremlin is preparing for a “possible meeting” between Trump and Putin at an event in Paris on Nov. 11, 2018, commemorating the centenary of the end of World War I.

At his talks with Bolton on Oct. 23, 2018, Putin mentioned the possibility of a Paris meeting on Nov. 11, 2018, and Bolton said that Trump would like to hold such a meeting.

This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Follow @RFERL on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

27 stunning photos of the US military in action this year

This past year has been unusual to say the least. The pandemic upended people’s lives around the world, and the same was true for members of the US military. Still, US troops continued to serve, doing incredible things both at home and abroad.

The following 27 photos by military photographers are awesome and offer a glimpse into some of what the military has been up to in 2020, from firing artillery to battling blazing infernos.

Jan. 14, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Army Staff Sgt. Daniel Pennington, a flight engineer assigned to B Co “Big Windy,” 1-214th General Support Aviation Battalion, takes in his ‘office’ view from the ramp of his CH-47 Chinook while flying over the island of Cyprus.

Jan. 29, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet soars above the clouds while conducting flight operations near Atsugi, Japan.

Mar. 12, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A Marine fires a Mossberg 500 12-gauge shotgun during a non-lethal weapons course at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California.

May 28, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Nicholas Spartz looks out of an MV-22B Osprey during parachute operations above Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

June 5, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Airmen assigned to the 347th Rescue Group drop flares during a “fini flight” for Col. Bryan Creel, the group’s commander, at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia.

July 15, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Soldiers simulate defending against opposing forces at Kahuku Training Area, Hawaii.

July 27, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marine Corps Sgt. Joshua Dick conceals himself during a stalking and infiltration exercise at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California.

July 31, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A soldier provides simulated cover fire during a live-fire exercise at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany.

Aug. 11, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
An Army M1 Abrams tank fires at a target during Defender-Europe at Drawsko Pomorskie Training Area, Poland.

Sept. 7, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A soldier deploys pyrotechnic flares to illuminate an area during an M4 night fire range event as part of the 2020 Army Reserve Best Warrior Competition at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

Sept. 12, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
An Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker over Southwest Asia.

Sept. 18, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Brent Hardsaw, 22nd Civil Engineer Squadron fire inspector, and Airman 1st Class Trace James, a fire protection apprentice assigned to the squadron, extinguish flames during a night aircraft burn training exercise at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas.

Sept. 20, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marines fire an M777A2 howitzer during training at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii.

Sept. 22, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet receives fuel from an Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker while flying in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.

Sept. 25, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
USS Germantown, USNS John Ericsson, USS Antietam, USS Ronald Reagan, USS America, USS Shiloh, USS New Orleans and USS Comstock break away from formation during Exercise Valiant Shield in the Philippine Sea.

Sept. 28, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Air Force and civilian firefighters participate in a nighttime live-fire burn exercise at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware.

Oct. 1, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet takes off from the flight deck of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in the Atlantic Ocean.

Oct. 13, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Army paratroopers jump from C-17 aircraft during airborne operations over the Malemute Drop Zone at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Oct. 16, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Austin Carroll refuels an AH-1Z Viper during training at Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California.

Oct. 23, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marines conduct special patrol insertion/extraction and helicopter rappel training at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan.

Oct. 28, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A Navy EA-18G Growler takes off from the flight deck of the USS Ronald Reagan in the Philippine Sea.

Oct. 31, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Le’Aundre Johnson and Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Apprentice Ronald Swinford direct an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter assigned to the “Golden Eagles” of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 162 (Reinforced) to launch aboard the Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7).

Nov. 4, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Soldiers fire an M777 howitzer at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Nov. 11, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A soldier assigned to the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as “The Old Guard,” walks the mat at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during a Veterans Day Observance at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.

Nov. 17, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
Marines with 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines, assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force – Crisis Response – Central Command, fire a 120 mm mortar round during a joint live-fire range in Kuwait.

Dec. 1, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
The Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Chafee launches a Block V Tomahawk missile during an exercise in the Pacific Ocean.

Dec. 6, 2020

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic
A service member participates in the 50th Winston P. Wilson and 30th Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting Sniper Championships at Fort Chaffee Joint Maneuver Training Center, Arkansas.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY TRENDING

After 43 years, hero Vietnam vet gets Navy Cross

It’s the summer of 1968 in Vietnam, a sergeant with Company K, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment was forced into a position he never could have imagined. He had to lead his entire company through a deadly enemy ambush after the company commander, platoon commander, and senior enlisted leadership were wounded in the fight.

These were the circumstances of retired Marine 1st Sgt. John J. Lord during the battle of Hue City, nearly half a century ago, during the Vietnam War.


Lord was awarded the Navy Cross, the nation’s second highest award for combat bravery, during a ceremony at a Marine Corps Birthday Ball celebration in Vancouver, Washington Nov. 17, 2018. The Navy Cross award was an upgrade from a Bronze Star that Lord received in 1975, seven years after he put himself in the cross-hairs of the North Vietnamese Army when rescuing his fellow Marines who were wounded.

Lord took over command of the entire company and located one of the only working radios and then started directing air support against the enemy.

Air Force sustains operations amid COVID-19 pandemic

U.S. Marines fighting in Hue.

The day immediately following the battle, now retired Lt. Col. Michael Sweeney began pushing for Lord to be awarded the Navy Cross for his heroism and valor during the fight. Even after the Bronze Star was awarded, Sweeney continued to push for the Navy Cross. Finally, 43 years later, Sweeney’s efforts bore fruit.

According to his citation, Lord’s actions helped turned the tide of the battle. However, he always stayed true to his men and their efforts during the fight.

“Everything on that citation is true except one thing they left off,” Lord said. “They left off the Marines who served with me that day.”

Four of his fellow unit members were in attendance the night of the ceremony, and stood at Lord’s behest to receive a standing ovation from all who were in attendance just like they did for Lord just moments prior.
Lord proclaimed how honored he was to serve with these Marines and how important they are to the mission.

“I can only stand here and say how proud I am to have served with you Marines — and corpsman, I won’t forget you too,” Lord said. “I am honored to call you brothers in arms.”

This article originally appeared on the United States Marine Corps. Follow @USMC on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

10 people who shouldn’t join the military

Military careers are awesome. Seriously, there are so many reasons why it’s a good choice to join the military. As a military publication, WATM obviously has a lot to say on that, but we want to explore the reality of military life from all angles. Military life has many benefits, but it’s not perfect. Up to 40% of new recruits fizzle out shortly after enlisting because they didn’t fully realize what military life is like. While you won’t know for sure until you begin boot camp, the following are a few signs that a military career may not be right for you. 

1. You don’t meet all the requirements to join the military.

Every branch of the military has a slightly different set of requirements. Before you bother trying to enlist, run through the list to make sure you’re qualified. If you have a history of drug use or alcohol dependency, you don’t make the cut. If you have a criminal record, elligibility depends on the nature of your history. Any medical conditions that require frequent treatment or could potentially interfere with your ability to fulfill your duties will also disqualify you. Even debt can make it harder to enlist! 

2. You make impulsive decisions.

If you have a history of jumping from job to job, tread carefully. This isn’t a job you can quit. If you change your mind after you’ve enlisted, it’s too late. Joining the military can, without a doubt, instill a deep sense of responsibility, accountability and commitment. Still, it’s not a decision to make on a whim. 

3. You want an independent lifestyle. 

When you join the military, you’re handing over the reigns. The freedoms you’re fighting for are now for someone else, because the military will decide how much you sleep, where you live, how you dress, how long your hair is … you get the picture. Individuality and freedom go out the window for the entire duration of your military career. Before joining the military, make sure those are sacrifices you’re willing to make. 

4. You have dependents and no contingency plan. 

Single parents in the military are uncommon. If you’re the primary caregiver of children, parents, or other close relatives, you’ll need a rock solid plan detailing who will take over their care while you’re on deployment. Even then, you’re not guaranteed a waiver. Each branch has different regulations as to how many dependents, spouses included, are allowed with and without a waiver. Long story short, if you shoulder a lot of responsibility at home, a military career may not be an option. 

5. You don’t do well under pressure. 

drill sergeant yelling during training

If you have a hard time coping with stress, run. This isn’t a judgment of character at all. If you know that high-pressure situations can trigger significant symptoms of anxiety or depression, military life will be a challenge. Ask yourself if joining the military and dealing with training, deployment, possible combat would be a healthy, sustainable choice. If the answer is no, that’s okay. There are other ways to serve your country, like volunteering and fundraising, that are much less stressful. 

6. You’re not willing to give up your recreational vices. 

Admittedly, some states have now legalized recreational marajuana usage. In the military, that’s still a big no no. Any drug usage is grounds for instant expulsion and possible jail time. THC stays in your system for weeks, so you can’t partake on days off, either. Drinking in moderation is acceptable, but DUIs or any signs of irresponsible drinking habits have big consequences. 

7. You expect total equality. 

women joinint the military

More military positions are open to women today than ever before. That said, the military can, and does, still discriminate based on gender. When we say discriminate, we mean differentiate. There is a biological difference in size and structure between men and women. I’d like to think I’m pretty strong, but I’m also 5’1 and 115lbs. Let’s get real; if a job requires sheer, brute force, I’m probably not the best pick for the job. For that very reason, some of the most physically demanding positions are still not open to women. If that’s an issue for you, don’t join.

8. You have a huge ego. 

If you’ve always been a big fish in a small pond, prepare for a rude awakening. Starting out, you’ll be at the lowest possible rank. Those of higher rank will tell you what to do, and you cannot say no- even if they’re a punk kid who’s five years younger than you. It doesn’t matter who you know, or how much you bench. You’re going to have to pay your dues and prove your worth like everyone else. 

9. You can’t deal with violence. 

Do we need to say more? No matter what branch of the military you join, violence is a possibility. Even mechanics, veterinarians, and doctors can be sent to combat zones. People in those and other non-combative positions have lost their lives on the job. If you serve in the Armed Forces, you don’t get to opt out of risky situations. You need to prepare yourself for that reality, both physically and mentally.  

10. You expect your family dynamic to stay completely the same when you join the military.

man in uniform holding wife's hand

When you’re gone for months at a time, your family learns to exist without you. The dynamic evolves. This doesn’t have to be a bad thing, but signing up for the military, your family life as you know it WILL change. Being apart can strain relationships, but it can also make you appreciate the time you have together in a whole new way. 

If you can deal with these “disclaimers”, serving your country can be life-altering…In a good way!

Enlisting is a monumental decision, but it’s one that comes with free healthcare, housing support, opportunities to travel, 30 days of paid vacation each year, college tuition coverage, and a community for life. If you’re not up for it, that’s okay! If you are, you’re in for a crazy ride.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Watch Taliban drug labs get the A-10’s BRRRRRT

The Air Force recently released two new videos of A-10 Warthogs taking out Taliban narcotics production facilities in Afghanistan, as the Trump administration continues to quietly ramp up the US’ nearly 17-year war in the country.


The videos are rather shocking. One shows several missile strikes that turned the black and white video nearly all-white for a few seconds before flames can be seen rolling up.

Also read: Afghanistan wants the A-10 to come back

“The Taliban have nowhere to hide,” Gen. John Nicholson, commander of Resolute Support in Afghanistan, said in February 2018, after the Air Force dropped a record number of smart bombs from a B-52 on Taliban training facilities.

“There will be no safe haven for any terrorist group … We continue to strike them wherever we find them. We continue to hunt them across the country.”

 

 

But a BBC study published in late January 2018 showed that the Taliban operates in about 70% of Afghanistan, and fully controls about 4% of the country.

The Taliban’s numbers have also reportedly grown three-fold in the last few years. In 2014, the Taliban’s forces were estimated to be about 20,000. Currently, they’re estimated to be at least 60,000-strong.

Related: Watch an A-10 light up a Taliban vehicle in Afghanistan

The US announced in November 2017 that it would begin targeting the Taliban’s revenue sources, much of which is opium and heroin, with airstrikes.

“October and November 2017 were two of the deadliest months for civilians,” according to the latest SIGAR report. “Press reports stated several civilians were killed during the November 2017 bombings.”

These casualties “could erode support for the Afghan government and potentially increase support for the insurgency,” the SIGAR report said.

 

 

Around the same time that Nicholson announced that the US would hit the Taliban “where it hurts, in their narcotics financing,” Afghan farmers told Reuters that drug labs only take about three to four days to rebuild.

Analysts speaking to Reuters characterized the US’ strategy in Afghanistan as a pointless game of “whack-a-mole.”

More: Watch what it’s like to be the target of an A-10

On March 13, 2018, Defense Secretary James Mattis said that the US is seeing signs that the Taliban are interested in returning to the negotiating table with Kabul.

“Mattis offered few details about the Taliban outreach and it was unclear whether the latest reconciliation prospects would prove any more fruitful than previous, frustrated attempts to move toward a negotiated end to America’s longest war,” Reuters reported.

MIGHTY TRENDING

Check out video of Russia’s famously bad aircraft carrier on fire

Russia’s only aircraft carrier, which has regularly been described as the worst in the world, burst into flames on Thursday while undergoing repairs.

10 people are injured, three are unaccounted for, and six were saved from the Admiral Kuznetsov, which was at port in Murmansk, according to reports from Russian state news agencies TASS and Interfax.

“Ten people were injured: they were mostly poisoned by combustion products,” a source told TASS. Six people are in intensive care.

TASS reported that the fire started in the engine room on the second deck, then has spread to the size of 120 square meters.


Firefighters are battling the blaze with limited success, according to the news agencies.

Aleksey Rakhmanov, head of the state-run United Shipbuilding Corporation, told Interfax that “a human factor” may have caused the fire.

Russia’s Northern Fleet reported two firefighters were injured while fighting the blaze, TASS reported.

The aircraft carrier was undergoing major repairs at Russia’s Arctic port in Murmansk, also known as the Barents Sea port.

The ship was seriously damaged in October, when a crane toppled over and smashed a 214-square-foot hole in the hull.

The aircraft carrier is has long been beset with operational problems.

On a 2016 mission in Syria, the carrier saw the loss of two onboard fighter jets in just three weeks.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

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