This new 'Surf Rifle' is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves - We Are The Mighty
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This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

There’s always One More Wave.


This is gear porn bulletin from WATM friends The Mad Duo at Breach-Bang-Clear.

Remember. At the risk of sounding unnecessarily contumelious, we must remind you – this is just an be advised, a public service if you will, letting you know these things exist and might be of interest. If you have questions about it, you’ll need to reach out to the respective organizations.

Grunts: Contumelious.

Surfers and guns — sometimes it’s a thing, ‘specially when those surfers are former pipe-hitters who love the sea, surf, and spray.

That’s why U.S. Navy veteran Alex West launched One More Wave, a non-profit that hand builds specialized surfboards that accommodate different veterans’ injuries. They want to make it easier for those disabled veterans to get back to riding waves. It’s therapeutic.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

As you can imagine, it’s hard to surf with just one leg, even if you have a badass prosthetic leg.

The new blaster is called the OMW Rifle. It’s a Noveske Gen III 300BLK with a 16 in. barrel (full specs below), and a large portion of proceeds from its sales will be donated to One More Wave.

They’ll use that money to help rehabilitate wounded vets — not just physically, but emotionally as well.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

Check ’em out.

Go check out the full specs on the rifle here on the Noveske website.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

Here’s how Noveske describe their decision to help One More Wave.

“One More Wave is a non-profit charity started by US military veterans with the focus of enhancing the recovery of wounded or disabled vets via ocean therapy.  They work with vets who have a wide range of disabilities, and hand craft surfboards to suit the specific injury. These surfboards are customized with graphics, and when needed, customized for performance- working with specific physical disabilities. Noveske is proud to partner with One More Wave to help raise money for the creation of these fully customized surfboards. A large portion of the profit of the One More Wave rifle will be donated to aid in offsetting the cost of building the boards, and providing each vet with a special, life changing experience.

It’s a story that moved us so much that we hit the drawing board with the One More Wave crew to cook up a new Gen III Noveske rifle, where a portion of their proceeds will go directly to aiding them in their mission of creating custom surf equipment to help veterans find that next wave and discover the therapy they need.”

About the Author: We Are The Mighty contributor Richard “Swingin’ Dick” Kilgore comes to us from our partners at BreachBangClear.com (@breachbangclear). He is one half of the most storied celebrity action figure team in the world. He believes in American Exceptionalism, holding the door for any woman and the idea that you should be held accountable for every word that comes out of your mouth. He may also be one of two nom de plumes for a veritable farrago of CAGs and FAGs (Current Action Guys and Former Action Guys). You can learn more about Swingin’ Dick right here.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

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Here’s a glimpse at the intense battle against ISIS that cost a Navy SEAL his life

Footage obtained by the British paper The Guardian shows the intense battle that claimed the life of U.S. Navy SEAL Charlie Keating IV.


Keating was part of a quick-reaction force that moved in to relieve another group of U.S. advisors supporting the Kurdish Peshmerga when ISIS broke through the Peshmerga’s lines with a massive assault using 20 technicals, car bombs, and a bulldozer.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
U.S. service members take shelter behind a truck during the battle which claimed the life of U.S. Navy SEAL Charlie Keating IV. Photo: YouTube/Journeyman Pictures

The efforts of Keating and the other SEALs were successful and the other U.S. advisor team survived, but Keating himself was shot. Though he was medevac’d out, he died of his wounds.

U.S. airstrikes and Peshmerga fighters succeeded in killing 58 of the attacking ISIS fighters, destroying many of the vehicles, and reclaiming the lost territory over the next 14 hours.

As the video below shows, Keating and his warrior brothers rushed to save others despite intense fire against them:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8toyJyHONA
(h/t Funker530)
Articles

The time Japanese submarines attacked California and Oregon during WWII

Aside from the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, many Americans aren’t familiar with other attacks on the states during WWII. Some may know of the Japanese invasion of Alaska or their planned remote attacks with fire balloons and biological weapons. However, very few people know about the direct Japanese attacks on the American West Coast.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Japanese submarine I-26, sister ship of I-25 (Public Domain)

About a week after Pearl Harbor, submarines of the Japanese 6th Fleet arrived off America’s Pacific coast. Nine submarines were tasked with performing reconnaissance and disrupting sea lanes. Four of the Japanese vessels carried out successful attacks on coastal shipping. As a result, two American tankers were sunk and one freighter was damaged. However, two Japanese submarines managed to carry out direct attacks on the mainland.

On February 19, 1942, submarine I-17 covertly landed on Point Loma, California, to determine her position before sailing up the California coast. Four days later, she surfaced off the Ellwood Oil Field near Santa Barbara, California. Just after 7pm, I-17 fired 17 rounds from her 14 cm/40 deck gun. Targeting the Richfield (ARCO) aviation fuel storage tanks behind the beach, the bombardment lasted 20 minutes. The closest shell landed in a field 30 yards from the nearest tank. One shell was so far off that it impacted over a mile inland. The shelling was largely ineffective, causing only minor damage to a pier and pump house. However, it did trigger fears of an impeding Japanese invasion along the West Coast. The attack made I-17 the first Axis ship to shell the United States mainland.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Battery 245 at Fort Stevens during WWII (National Archives and Records Administration)

On the night of June 21, 1942, submarine I-25 surfaced at the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon. With her deck gun, I-25 fired 17 shells at the coastal artillery installation of Fort Stevens. Although the bombardment caused no damage to the base itself, it did destroy the backstop of the base’s baseball field. The attack by I-25 made Fort Stevens the first CONUS military installation to come under enemy fire during WWII. In fact, it was the first attack on a CONUS military installation since the War of 1812.

On August 15, 1942, I-25 left Yokosuka to make what would be the final Japanese attack on the American coast. The attack was reprisal for the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo in April of that year. On September 9, I-25 launched its E14Y “Glen” seaplane. Piloted by Warrant Flying Officer Nobuo Fujita, the plane dropped two 76-kilogram incendiary bombs on a forest near Brookings, Oregon. Though the mission was meant to trigger wildfires, light winds and typically wet Pacific Northwest weather kept the fire from spreading. The attack remains the only time an enemy aircraft has bombed the mainland United States.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Nobuo Fujita standing by his E14Y “Glen” seaplane (Public Domain)

Both submarines were lost in August 1943. Despite the psychological impact of their attacks, the value of submarines was heavily discounted in the Japanese Navy. Lacking doctrine, the Japanese submarine campaign was far less effective than either the German or American submarine campaigns of WWII.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Soldiers inspect an impact crater from the bombardment of Fort Stevens (National Archives and Records Administration)

Featured image: Junichi_Mikuriya_-_Japanese_submarine_attacks_coast_of_California.jpg (Wikimedia Commons)

Articles

8 life lessons from ‘Major Payne’

Although it’s not considered an all-time military movie classic like “Full Metal Jacket” or “Stripes,” the 1995 military comedy “Major Payne” is an entertaining family film (with some salty language). The film stars comedian Damon Wayans as U.S. Marine Corps Major Benson Winifred Payne. Payne is a rough and tough Marine who becomes a Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps instructor after being discharged from active duty for not making lieutenant colonel. Payne’s job is to impart confidence and discipline in the rambunctious junior cadets and train them to win a military cadet competition.


The film has some funny and memorable lines – quoted in military training to this day – such as “What we have here is a failure to communicate” and “I’m gonna put my foot so far up your ass, the water on my knee will quench your thirst.” In between laughs, Major Payne bestows some surprising life lessons that apply to current service members, veterans, and society at large.

1. Career transitions are tough – expect setbacks

Major Payne is served his separation papers from the Marines in the beginning of the film. Just a week out of the service, Payne finds himself in jail after a failed attempt to become a police officer by slapping a man senseless during a training scenario.”It’s civilian life, sir. I had a minor setback,” Payne tells his former commander Gen. Decker, played by Albert Hall. Thanks to the help of his former commander, he lands the job as the JROTC instructor.

Lesson: Many people face a career change at some point in their lives. Setbacks are inevitable but it’s important to be patient. It is also important to use your network when looking for a new career.

2. Not everyone is sympathetic; mental toughness goes a long way

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

The gif above is Major Payne’s most famous quote. He gives his young cadets this verbal tirade as they struggle to complete an obstacle course in the pouring rain. Eventually, the persistence and will of the cadets lead them to overcome the obstacle course and achieve success.

Lesson: Not everyone will be sympathetic to your plight, no matter how difficult things are in your personal or professional life. When faced with challenges, being mentally strong and determined can help overcome any challenge, no matter the level of difficultly.

3. Keep trying to improve

In a classic drill instructor tone, Major Payne tells the young men, “You’re still a shit sandwich, you’re just not a soggy one” following a drill and ceremony routine. In his own unique way, the rough and tough character is acknowledging the effort put in by the boys to improve.

Lesson: Never stop trying to improve. You can always get better.

4. Don’t give up

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

For Major Payne, failure is not an option. He wants victory at all costs! In order to win the military games, he puts the cadets through hell. He shaves their heads, PTs them all day and makes them run in dresses in front of the whole school. Despite their disdain for the man and his tough training methods, the kids don’t quit.

Lesson: Life will bring challenges. Don’t let that prevent you from achieving your goals.

5. Teamwork is important

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

The cadets are a ragtag group from the beginning. Despite their differences, they build cohesion, delegate responsibilities and establish a common goal to win the military games.

Lesson: The value of camaraderie is vital in bringing a group of people to work well together no matter their differences. Working effectively as a team will bring success to any project whether you are in the civilian or military sector.

6. Loyalty is crucial

Major Payne is given the chance to return to active duty at the rank of lieutenant colonel. Initially, he chooses to take the job offer and leaves the boys high and dry before the competition. Eventually, his love and loyalty to the cadets brings him back to see his boys in the final event of the competition. He stays on as a JROTC instructor.

Lesson: It seems the thought of loyalty as a core tenet is slipping away to self-interest these days. Being loyal to friends, family or co-workers takes time and sacrifice. Believing in and devoting yourself to someone or something you care about is a great value to have for the rest of your life.

7. Self-confidence is essential

Major Payne instills confidence in all of his cadets, especially the smallest one in the group “Tiger.” He tells him a frightening version of “The Little Engine that Could,” and makes him the drill team leader. This gives Tiger the confidence he needs to trust his abilities. Tiger’s self-confidence shines through as the boys do a drill routine with a classic 90’s hip-hop beat and old-school rhymes. Tiger even breaks it down with the “Cabbage Patch” dance and some vintage Michael Jackson moves. His self-confidence helps him lead the team to victory.

Lesson: Trusting in your abilities will help you accomplish your goals. Believe in yourself.

8. Lighten up

Major Payne is a military badass. He takes his life and his work seriously but he begins to lighten up a bit during the movie. He even has a little fun on the dance floor with some sweet robot moves.

Lesson: There are times in life to be serious, but it’s ok to lighten up. Being able to enjoy life, relax, and not be so uptight can make life more enjoyable. YOLO.

MIGHTY TACTICAL

Record your shooting feats with Tactacam

While attending Sig Sauer Range Day, a camera attached to a spotting scope at the 500 yard range set aside for the Sig Cross caught our eye.


It was a Tactacam, a company who originally got involved with producing cameras and mounts for bow hunting.

Their first scope related product was the FTS, Film Through Scope for $139. This allows a Tactacam camera ($199-$429) to be attached to a scope while still being able to use the scope in a traditional fashion. Or it’s sold as a complete package with an MSRP of $569.

Now, we’ve seen and used similar products before, such as the Phone Skope Skoped Vision Pro, which uses your cellphone as a camera, as well as the Torrey Pines Eagle Eye for which you need to supply your own GoPro.

However, the star Tactacam was showing off was their new system which has an integral 4k camera system and attaches to a spotting scope.

The camera features an articulati USB-C, accepts a Micro SD card, and has a micro-HDMI out.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

Tactacam on Facebook

While there are a number of products which allow to record spotting scope footage, many of them are a pain to setup and can ultimately be kind of janky (we have several ourselves). Mounting was accomplished with a simple clamp mount and a twist; the locking turrets on the camera are integrated into the body.

Tactacam also has an app to connect your camera to your phone for hands-free viewing, but our preference would be to use the micro-HDMI out with a portable field monitor. When a camera is mounted, the less you have to touch the spotting scope, the better, as the magnification level exponential amplifies any itinerant movement.

MSRP for this setup Tactacam is not yet set, but we’re told the entire system will go for in-between 9 and 9–not too shabby for a system that includes a dedicated 4k camera. In the meantime, you can visit Tactacam online here.

This article originally appeared on Recoilweb. Follow @RecoilMag on Twitter.

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How firefighters could harness the power of military drones

 

Watch the latest video at a href=”http://video.foxnews.com”video.foxnews.com/a

What happens when a terrorist hunting drone and a resupply helicopter drone join forces?


Fires get stopped.

Aircraft with human pilots have been supporting American firefighters for several decades. This is a new generation of machines helping to fight fires.

The Stalker Extended Endurance (XE) and K-MAX drones could reinforce firefighters and potentially reduce the risk to the lives of first responders.

Last year alone, there were a staggering 1,298,000 fires reported in the U.S., resulting in more than 3,275 civilian deaths and 15,775 injuries.

 

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Stalker XE and K-MAX (Lockheed Martin).

Both Stalker and K-MAX are designed to be cutting-edge military tech, but they also have great potential for civilians to help reduce the loss of life and life-changing injuries suffered every year.

How do the drone duo fight fires?

Basically, Stalker XE is the boss and K-MAX does the heavy lifting. Stalker XE is a small surveillance drone and K-MAX is a large resupply helicopter one. Together, they can fight fires all by themselves. Stalker finds the fire and directs K-MAX to drop water at exactly the right location to put it out.

They’re both unmanned systems, or drones. Stalker uses its state-of-the-art military tech to flag and precisely locate a fire. The drone then communicates with the much bigger K-MAX, which is loaded up with water.

In a recent demonstration, Stalker XE successfully directed K-MAX to drop water exactly at the necessary spots to put out the fire.

Heat can be a serious challenge in fighting fires. In spite of the immense heat fire can generate, K-MAX was designed to maintain performance in extremes and can still perform.

Conditions like smoke can also limit traditional missions due to visibility for human pilots, but K-MAX can carry on picking up water and delivering it by itself in low visibility conditions.

Stalker XE is an intelligence, surveillance and recon drone made by Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works, famous for innovative aircraft design.

Popular with special operations, Stalker XE is a small drone with a 12-foot wingspan. When flown at about 400 feet, it is silent to people on the ground.

Launched by just one operator and a bungee, it can stay aloft for more than eight hours, reach speeds of 45 mph and heights of up to 15,000 feet with its ruggedized solid oxide fuel cell.

It is designed to provide high-definition images in a range of the extreme environments. In both daylight and at night, the drone can provide images and data.

In addition to its high-def capabilities, Stalker XE’s image-tracking tech has the ability to pan, tilt and zoom using its electro-optical infrared camera, which can precisely locate and analyze fire intensity for K-MAX. The imagers and laser can also provide precise geo-referenced imagery products for human firefighting teams to review.

K-MAX

Manufactured by Kaman and equipped with Lockheed Martin’s advanced mission systems and sensors, K-MAX is used by the military to get massive amounts of supplies to forces quickly. It can lift and deliver a whopping 6,000 pounds of cargo at sea level as well as travel at speeds of about 115 mph.

During a three-year period between 2011 and 2014, when it deployed with the U.S. Marine Corps, for example, K-MAX delivered more than 4.5 million pounds of cargo for the Corps while flying more than 1,900 missions.

Its design includes a four-hook carousel that helps to maximize the cargo it can deliver to different locations in just one flight.

With the drone’s advanced autonomy tech, K-MAX can deploy day and night on repeat missions – without the limiting factor of human fatigue and crew availability.

The helicopters twin-rotor design helps to maximize lift in extreme environments. Very robust, it has also been designed to fly in all sorts of challenging weather conditions.

Will they get the chance to fight fires in the U.S.?

Recently, both drones worked together to fight a fire successfully integrated into the National Airspace System. Using a prototype of unmanned Traffic Management tech, the robot team effectively communicated with Air Traffic Control in real time.

This is a key step forward to joining the fight against fires. Because for these drones to deploy in civilian space, they need to prove they can cooperate with, and within, the civilian airspace framework.

Articles

Metal Giants ‘Queensryche’ Take On War

There has been a major split between lead singer Geoff Tate and the rest of the band in recent months, but a few years ago, legendary metal band Queensryche was tightly focused on “American Soldier,” the band’s take on the modern experience of war.


Here’s the first video they produced for the album:

Articles

The 13 funniest military memes of the week

It’s a Friday tradition or something. Here are 13 more hilarious military memes:


1. Oh … reflective belts finally make sense.

(via Devil Dog Nation)

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
It’s because lasers. Got it.

2. No one ever wants to play catch with us.

(via Air Force Nation)

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Oh well, there’s always next season.

SEE ALSO: 5 real-world covert operations in FX’s ‘Archer’

3. Better hope land nav is held in the playground.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Too boot to even tie his own.

4. Oooh, four shapes at once.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This guy is good.

5. Just stay silent …

(via Air Force Memes and Humor)

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

6. Finally, a Navy spirit cake (via Sh-t my LPO says).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Pretty sure it tastes like boatswain tears.

7. Like budget problems would explain this photo (via Coast Guard Memes).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
What, every part of the vacuum works except the handle?

8. Do not mistake their courtesies for weakness(via Military Memes).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
The most polite allies that America has.

9. Accelerate your life (via Pop Smoke).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

10. Semper Fidelis-ish (via Devil Dog Nation).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

11. We can make it. We can make it. We can …

(via Sh-t my LPO says)

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
… nope.

12. Sometimes, your brain is a douchebag (via The Salty Soldier).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
First two weeks back from deployment is nothing but false alarms.

13. They need your help.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Remember to tag your LTs so that you can find any that wander off.

Articles

How the Civil War created the modern US economy

The Civil War was a pivotal moment in the history of the United States. The war was responsible for more American deaths than any other conflict, and it has played a continuous role in both the culture and economy of the US ever since.


During the course of the Civil War, the US national debt ballooned to 40 times its previous size. The cost of the war ushered in several new rounds of taxes to fund the war effort — changes that are still in full effect today.

The following graphic, from Norwich University’s Online Masters in Military History program, shows how the effects of the Civil War are still with the US today and how the war permanently changed the face of the US economy and federal spending.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

MIGHTY HISTORY

This is what it took to be a U-boat ace in World War II

We’ve all heard of fighter aces. We’re talking legends like Robin Olds, Duke Cunningham, Pappy Boyington, James Howard, Jimmy Thach, and Swede Vejtasa. Germany had their own aces, and while Erich Hartmann and Adolf Galland are just some who attained immortality with their feats in the skies, others, like Otto Kretschmer and Gunther Prien, were renowned for what they did under the sea.


Kretschmer and Prien were both considered “U-boat aces,” and according to uboat.net, they were part of an elite group. Out of 498 men in World War I, and 1,401 in World War II who commanded U-boats, only a total of 71 men sank more than 100,000 tons of enemy shipping. The tonnage totals are eye-popping in comparison to American commanders, many of whom were rotated out of front-line duty to train new crewmen, similar to the policy used for ace fighter pilots like Thach.

America’s top sub skippers, like Eli Reich or Joe Enright, earned their notoriety on single missions. Reich sank the only battleship to be sunk by American submarines during the war, avenging fallen shipmates, while Enright holds the distinction of sinking the Shinano, the largest vessel ever sink by a submarine.

Germany’s U-boat aces pulled some incredible feats, themselves. Prien, for instance, earned his fame by sneaking into the British naval base of Scapa Flow and sinking the battleship HMS Royal Oak. 825 British sailors died when the Revenge-class battleship was hit by three torpedoes.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
U-995, the only surviving Type VII U-boat in the world. (Wikimedia Commons)

 

Kretschmer was the top-ranking U-boat ace of World War II, sinking 46 ships totaling over 274,000 tons of displacement. Compare that to the JANAC total credited to USS Tang (SS 306), Medal of Honor recipient Richard O’Kane’s command, which sank 24 ships totaling 93,824 tons of displacement.

The German U-boat aces were also survivors. All five of their top aces lived through the war, but one was accidentally killed by a sentry five days after the war, and another died in 1950, and of their top ten skippers, only Gunther Prien was killed in action during the war.

Articles

The 13 funniest military memes of the week

Memes time! It’s like MRE time, except you laugh instead of getting constipated. Great Navy memes seem to be the hardest to find, so thanks go to Sh-t My LPO Says for numbers 7, 8, and 12.


1. Everyone is feeling the sting of budget cuts.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Maybe you could divert some cafe and cable TV money to the training budget.

2. They’re both used to being top dog …

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
… and neither knows that the civilians don’t care.

SEE ALSO: The inside joke names that soldiers have for different unit patches 

3. Has the Navy been spending the war years doing donuts in the oceans?

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Sort of makes the Navy seem more appealing.

 4. This also could factor into deciding which service branch to join.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Seriously? Come on, Navy and Air Force. This mud isn’t going to sleep in itself.

5. First sergeant will either join in or lose his mind in 3, 2, 1 …

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

6. Maybe he’ll shoot the emergency azimuth properly and everything will be fine.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
You should probably make sure you have lots of water and your sleeping system, just in case.

7. Follow the letter of the rules, not the spirit.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Still, kind of ingenious.

8. Careful what you wish for.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Nah. The first thing you see is that fancy bulkhead or the underside of a nice sleeping rack.

9. In their defense, if it wasn’t mandatory, they wouldn’t wear that costume.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Side note, maybe do some mandatory training on the spelling of mandatory.

10. Artillery: not the King of the Battle because of their oratorial skills.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Really, wanting to kill everyone should be the threshold for bringing Marine infantry as well.

11. A pilot demonstrates his ability to shake.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
First dog in space: 1957. First Air Force pilot in space: 1961.

 12. At least he didn’t lose his shower shoes.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
This is why he showers fully clothed.

13. Ancient, timeless wisdom.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
The composite risk management process was the first appendix in the Art of War.

NOW: 9 text messages from First Sergeant you never want to read 

OR WATCH: 11 incredible videos of weapons firing in slow motion 

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Here’s how Michael Bay involved veterans in ‘Transformers: The Last Knight’

We Are The Mighty was invited to check out an early screening of “Transformers: The First Knight” — and we just couldn’t resist.


Michael Bay kills it when it comes to directing action scenes, which makes it even more exciting when he portrays military assets looking sh*t hot (A-10 Warthogs in the original “Transformers,” anyone?).

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

“Michael Bay is a big fan of veterans,” Alan Pietruszewski told We Are The Mighty. A U.S. Navy Commander turned filmmaker and actor, Pietruszewski has an invested interest in veterans in the entertainment community.

He has also witnessed first-hand how much the blockbuster director respects the military — Pietruszewski was one of the vets sought out by Bay to work on the “Transformers” films. Bay goes out of his way to hire and cast veterans on his sets, in front of and behind the camera.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

There’s a big difference between the military and the depiction of the military onscreen, but with Hollywood’s tendency to perpetuate military myths, it’s nice to know that big directors like Bay are leading the way in including the military in their films.

And it shows. “Transformers: The Last Knight” had some great military moments, including some fantastic F-35 Lightning II action.

Check out how they shot it in this video of Josh Duhamel on set at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona:

 (Transformers: The Last Knight | YouTube)

Catch Transformers: The Last Night in theaters June 21, 20017 — and keep an eye out for World War II Bumblebee, which should just become the next film in the franchise.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves

Articles

Iran plans post-2020 naval expansion

Iran is planning for a bigger navy as soon as provisions of the 2015 nuclear deal expire. Planned purchases include new warships and submarines much more advanced than vessels currently in the theocracy’s inventory.


According to the Times of Israel, the United States Navy’s Office of Naval Intelligence issued a report on Iran’s naval strength. The SS-N-26 Yakhont, already in service with Russia, was mentioned as one system Iran was seeking to acquire.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
Iranian fast-attack boats during a naval exercise in 2015. (Wikimedia photo by Sayyed Shahaboddin Vajedi)

According to a website maintained by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Yakhont, which has a range of just under 162 nautical miles, has already been exported to Indonesia, Vietnam, and Syria. A variant of the SS-N-26, the BrahMos, is in service with India. CSIS noted that most of Syria’s missiles were destroyed in a July 2013 air strike by the Israeli Defense Force.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
SS-N-26 at at MAKS Airshow in Zhukovskiy, 1997. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

According to the 16th Edition of Combat Fleets of the World, Iran’s most modern combat vessels are three Kilo-class submarines acquired from Russia in the 1990s. The Kilos have six 21-inch torpedo tubes and can hold up to 18 torpedoes.

Modern versions of that sub in service with the Russian Navy can fire the SS-N-27/SS-N-30 Sizzler cruise missile. The SS-N-26, SS-N-27, and SS-N-30 have both land-attack and anti-ship variants.

The Times of Israel report comes just as the United States Navy announced a close encounter between a Military Sealift Command vessel and an Iranian frigate. According to CBSNews.com, an Iranian frigate came within 150 yards of the missile range instrumentation ship USNS Invincible (AGM 24).

The encounter was described as “unprofessional, but not unsafe” due to the fact that the frigate was not approaching the MSC vessel, but was instead on a parallel course.

This new ‘Surf Rifle’ is built to benefit wounded vets who like to hit the waves
USNS Invincible (T AGM 24). (MSC photo)

The Military Sealift Command website notes that USNS Invincible displaces 2,285 tons, has a top speed of 11 knots, and a crew of 18. The vessel is unarmed, and is used for collecting data on missile launches. It is one of two in service.

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