America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14 - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY TRENDING

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Russia may have a major buyer interested in its next generation T-14 Armata battle tank.

Indian Army Chief General Bipin Rawat is currently on an official visit to Russia, where he will tour several military facilities and discuss defense deals worth over $10 billion, according to Russian and Indian media.

One of the topics of conversation will be the T-14 Armata battle tank and other platforms part of the Armata universal chassis system, according to The Diplomat, which cited Indian defense sources.


Russia’s Armata Universal Combat Platform is based on a single chassis that can be used for other Armata vehicles, such as the T-14 tank, the T-15 (or Terminator 3) Infantry fighting vehicle and the Koalitsiya-SV self-propelled howitzer.

In November 2017, India announced it was looking for 1,770 combat vehicles to replace its aging arsenal of Soviet armored vehicles, made up mostly of Soviet T-72s tanks.

New Delhi plans to build whichever vehicles it ends up choosing in India with help from the manufacturer.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

A 2S35 Koalitsiya-SV.

But a US law known as the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, which President Donald Trump signed in August 2018, could throw a wrench in any future deals.

CAATSA sanctions any country trading with Russia’s defense and intelligence sectors, but sanctions could be avoided by a new provision in the National Defense Authorization Act that allows the president to exempt sanctions on any purchases.

Initially, Moscow said it would put 2,300 T-14s into service by 2020, but has massively scaled back procurements due to budget constraints.

Moscow signed a contract for 132 T-14 and T-15 platforms in late August 2018, with the first nine getting delivered in 2018, and the rest by 2021, Russian state-owned media outlet TASS reported.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY TRENDING

South Korea’s special ops wants to kill Kim Jong Un with suicide drones

South Korea is planning to arm its newly-formed special forces unit, known as the “decapitation unit,” with suicide drones and other lethal weapons to take out North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, according to the Korea Herald.


The South Korean Defense Ministry announced on Dec. 6 that the decapitation unit was allocated $310,000 for weapons and equipment, and an anonymous Defense Ministry official told the Herald that the unit will receive $24 million altogether.

The “equipment includes suicide drones, surveillance drones, and grenade machine guns,” the defense ministry official told the Herald.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
Concept imagery of a weaponized drone. (Image: YouTube)

The decapitation unit is an army brigade consisting of 1,000 special operators. It was established on Dec. 1 with the aim of assassinating Kim and his top leaders.

It’s expected to be modeled off SEAL Team 6, but it’s not yet operational as it requires more equipment, such as low-flying aircraft to take the operators into North Korea, the Herald reported.

South Korean officials have been openly discussing the formation of the unit since summer 2015. It’s considered strange for a government to freely talk about assassinating world leaders.

Read Also: Future Marine mega-drone may carry same weapons as F-35

But the New York Times reported in September that the South is doing so in the hopes of scaring Kim Jong Un back to the negotiating table.

“The best deterrence we can have, next to having our own nukes, is to make Kim Jong Un fear for his life,” Shin Won-sik, a retired South Korean three-star general, told the Times.

The South’s allocation of $310,000 to the unit is part of the its nearly $40 billion defense budget for 2018, which has increased 7% since 2016 and is the highest since 2009, according to Newsweek.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Why I’m strong: How one military daughter feels about deployment

The day my dad left for deployment brought me hard feelings – feelings that were hard for me to process. The thought of him being in harms way made me afraid. Knowing how much I would miss him made be unbelievably sad. All that I knew for sure is that I did not want to take him to the drop off point.

I wanted him to stay.


America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Military Spouse)

Once we arrived at the squadron, I tried to convince myself to hold everything together, hiding how I was feeling and I put on a brave face. I certainly did not want to lose control of my emotions in front of a room full of strangers. But when I heard the loud slam of the van door closing and I realized that my Daddy was about to drive away, I stopped caring about who was around.

I sprinted toward the vehicle, wildly yanking at the door handle. “I just want you to stay. Please. Please stay.” I started to cry. The feeling of dread loomed over me. He opened the door and gave me one last hug. My Dad held me close and promised that everything would be okay.

But it wasn’t okay.

Living without my Dad was harder than I thought. I wanted to talk to him -to tell him about all the things I was learning and fun things I was doing. He missed a lot. He missed Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. It was awful. Christmas was not the same. I was glad we could open presents over video chat, but all I wanted for Christmas was to have him home.

Everything about life without him stressed me out and I began to be overly anxious. There were several times where my head felt like it was spinning. I was overwhelmed with worry. Many nights, I wouldn’t sleep. I cried a lot. Living life without my dad home just made me feel blue.

Nothing felt normal. When Dad is home, he takes me out to dinner and spends time with me. I can tell him all about what is happening and how I feel. I really missed these nights. We could really only talk for a few minutes because there was a seven-hour time difference. Night time was the worst. I feel safer when he is here.

It wasn’t all bad. We went on a few family vacations and even went to Great Wolf Lodge. I mean, we only went to Great Wolf because of the eight million delays for dad’s homecoming- making Dad miss my brother’s birthday. But it was fun.

If I had to do all over again (which I hope won’t be for a while), I would do a few things differently. Maybe, if you are a kid in the middle of a deployment -or getting ready for one – here are a few things I learned.

You can’t control everything. Don’t try. Stop trying to make everything perfect. You can’t. Recognize the things that you can control, like yourself or how clean your room is, and control what you can. I organized my books, made slime, and did things that made me feel comfortable.

Be patient with your family. Everyone is sad or stressed. Emotions are running hot and even the littlest things feel more annoying. Do your best to give people a break and stay calm. When I got overwhelmed, I would retreat to my room and count backwards from sixty. I would count colors or patterns in my room. Also, I bout “Pinch Me” dough, which smelled like the beach. Find something that brings you joy and peace.

Have lots of comfort food. (Oreos are always a good choice.) Nothing beats a snack. Snacks are wonderful, and sharing them with a friend is even better. When I was feeling sad or frustrated, I would invite my next-door neighbor over for a snack and a chat. It always made me feel better.

Lastly, call your friends. The beauty of military life is that you have friends everywhere. When I needed to, I would call my best friends, Talia and Aurea. They would cheer me up, help me think through what I feel, and give me encouragement. They know what this is like. Both of them, like me, are military kids.

Deployment seasons might not always be “okay,” but they are only temporary. They don’t last forever. I know that my dad does hard things, like being away, because he wants to serve our country. I can do hard things, too. He believes in freedom and he tells me that I can do my part too. I’m strong because he is strong. I love you, Daddy. Thank you for all you do.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Military Spouse)

This article originally appeared on Military Spouse. Follow @MilSpouseMag on Twitter.


MIGHTY TRENDING

Watch Kim Jong Un’s charlie foxtrot of a red carpet entrance

Tension and confusion gripped a train platform in Russia’s far-eastern city of Vladivostok on April 23, 2019, when North Korean Kim Jong Un’s bullet-proof armored train pulled in for a summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Both Putin and Kim are known for making grand entrances and power moves like showing up late to meetings with world leaders. But Kim on April 23, 2019, appeared delayed due to a gaffe.

Kim arrived via train, as is his family’s custom and perhaps a clever way to avoid admitting his country has few working aircraft — but something was amiss.


When Kim’s train pulled into the station, it slightly overshot a red carpet laid out in advance for his big stepping-out moment.

While Kim maintains a horrific human rights record at home, he has been increasingly courted by world leaders looking to curb his country’s growing nuclear capabilities.

Apparently, Kim’s security detail found it unacceptable that he should walk on anything besides the red carpet, and had to stand there awkwardly holding a ramp while the train repositioned.

The meeting between Putin and Kim represents just the fourth official summit with a world leader for Kim. Putin, however, has met with most national leaders across Asia.

Russia and North Korea have historical ties of friendship, though the relations became strained during North Korea’s long nuclear breakout.

Upon arrival, Kim appeared to shake off any embarrassment from the train gaffe and quickly spoke to Russian media, a rare step from a leader who previously only spoke through North Korean state outlets.

Kim’s visit to Russia comes at a time when US-North Korean talks have stalled over a basic misunderstanding over the pacing of denuclearization steps and sanctions easing.

North Korea recently publicized the testing of a “tactical” weapon, potentially as a warning to the US that if talks collapse, missile launches and “fire and fury” could again become the norm.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Gina Elise knows how to make a first impression

I’m in an Uber driving north, passing by the Hollywood Sign. I am supposed to be headed south. My driver swears he knows a shortcut. Ok, Raffee, we’ll see, bro — but my land nav skills are telling me we’re headed towards a disaster and I’m late.


Really late, and this is not the impression I want to send to the woman waiting for me at the famous Hollywood American Legion. I’ve just arrived, thanks to Raffee’s shortcut. He earned his 5 stars today. As I rush to the entrance of the historic building that rightfully looks like a bunker defending the Hollywood Hills, I realize that I’ve just traveled back in time.

Before me is a marvelous Pin-Up model posing before a row of flags and one large cannon. She’s got it all. Hair perfectly curled, a vintage-inspired 1940s dress, and a smile that is making our cameraman blush. This is an image that could sell war bonds or find its way onto the nose cone of a B-24. Wow, I just learned that Pin-Ups For Vets‘ Founder, Gina Elise, really knows how to make a first impression.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Pin-Ups for Vets Founder Gina Elise at the Hollywood American Legion.

(Photo courtesy of @markharper147)

Here I am, nervous and fumbling with my bag as Gina takes photo after photo almost effortlessly. She’s a pro. It’s been 13 years since Gina founded Pin-Ups For Vets, a non-profit organization that supports active military and veterans by producing an annual fundraiser pin-up calendar. The Pin-Ups For Vets Ambassadors visit ill and injured veterans in VA hospitals across the country (Gina’s volunteered in 31 of the 50 states). The organization also purchases thousands of dollars of rehabilitation equipment for VA therapy departments.

The photoshoot is coming to end when Gina tells me she has a surprise. She’s baked an eight-layer brownie for me and the cameraman. Seriously, is there anything that Gina can’t do? Right now, she’s off to change before our chat. As I bite into the absolutely delicious snack, it hits me that Gina, like the brownie, has many layers that only get sweeter and sweeter.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Pin-Ups for Vets Founder, Gina Elise, at the Hollywood American Legion.

(Photo courtesy of @markharper147)

I’m downstairs at the American Legion. It’s dark and the smell of cigars lingers. This is definitely a place for veterans and is home to some pretty amazing movie history. Just out of the corner of my eye is the long bar where Jack Nicholson had a conversation with a ghost bartender in The Shining. And, just like old Jack, I wonder if my eyes are playing tricks on me as Gina approaches in a fresh new dress.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Pin-Ups for Vets Founder, Gina Elise, at the Hollywood American Legion.

(Photo courtesy of @markharper147)

You ready?

GE: [She smiles]. Yes.

So, what were you doing before you came here?

GE: Today?

Totally. I am curious about what you do when you aren’t owning photoshoots?

GE: I was wrapping up some details for our upcoming visit with hospitalized veterans! I was also trying to see if our CBS News clip was up online yet, so I could share it on our Facebook page. I like to keep our supporters up-to-date about things that we’re doing.

And baking Brownies?

GE: I wanted to bring dessert for you guys. These bars have seven ingredients with a chocolate glaze on top.

Thank you. [I can still taste the glaze]

GE: I was also planning a morale-boosting pin-up makeover for a female Air Force veteran. We have multiple projects going on all the time. I have to be a multi-tasker.

Makeovers?

GE: It’s one of the things that we’ve been doing for a while. We do makeovers for female veterans and military wives as a fun way to give back to them and pamper them. I also just released a casting call for our 2020 calendar. It’s our 14th edition! We’ve received more submissions this year than ever before!

What does it take to be a Pin-Up in the calendar?

GE: Well, we look for female Veterans who have great stories to share. We ask them to submit their picture, tell us a bit about their military service and why they would like to be in our next calendar and what that would mean to them.

Last year’s calendar at the Queen Mary was amazing. It’s still hanging in my office. How do you find these places?

GE: The 2019 Pin-Ups For Vets calendar was photographed on the Queen Mary. Producing the calendar every year is like making a film — from location scouting to casting to styling to pre-production to photography to post-production to editing and printing. It takes months. I want it to be top notch so people want to order it year after year. Many of our supporters collect them, and some have the entire calendar collection — all the way from 2007, our first edition.

And you do this all yourself?

GE: I have a lot of amazing volunteers, many of whom are female veterans.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Pin-Ups pose on the Queen Mary for the 2019 Pin-Ups for Vets Calendar.

(Photo courtesy of @pinupsforvets)

Really? Are you recruiting an army of Pin-Ups?

GE: It’s really a sisterhood of volunteers. They are coming together, after their military service, to give back to their brothers and sisters. One of our volunteers recently told me, “I came for the service. I stayed for the sisterhood.” I think that having images of female veterans in the calendar is a starting point to tell their story. Images are powerful. People want to know, “Who is she?” Then, they find out that she is a veteran. It makes people think twice, as it is a common assumption that veterans are only men. The ladies constantly tell me that they are often mistaken for being a military spouse. They are not assumed to be a veteran because their gender. I think that the calendars have started changing peoples’ minds on what a veteran is.

You’ve definitely changed my mind. What’s the craziest place you’ve seen your pictures?

GE: They’ve gone all over the world. We are constantly shipping care packages to deployed units.

I have to ask: has anybody painted you on the side of their Humvee?

GE: Soldiers put my name on a helicopter!

Ok, that’s pretty cool. I mean, not a lot of people get their name on a helicopter.

GE: It was a great picture.

Yeah, I have to get that picture. OK?

GE: Of course.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Gina Elise painted on the side of an AH-64 Apache Helicopter.

(Photo courtesy of @pinupsforvets)

It’s pretty amazing that you’ve used an iconic 1940s fashion style to embrace femininity within the military culture. How do the ladies even start to learn how to be a Pin-Up?

GE: The ladies who volunteer with us have adopted the 1940s style so well. They watch YouTube tutorials about how to do their hair and makeup. There’s something about presenting yourself in this vintage style that makes you feel really confident. It’s a beautiful celebration of a woman. It’s really about embracing our femininity. I love how I feel when I get dressed up. It gives me confidence.

Really? Confidence doesn’t seem to be hard for you at all. You’re a natural leader.

GE: I was shy growing up. Being involved in leadership classes in junior high and high school were life-changing for me. They gave me a sense of responsibility at a very early age, and showed me what I was capable of doing. Maybe that is why I connected so well with the military community — because there is such a focus on strong leadership.

A little bird told me that you are a Colonel?

GE: Honorary. The American Legion made me an Honorary Colonel. It was incredible. We are so grateful to the American Legion. They’ve been so supportive of what we do.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

Pin-Ups for Vets Founder, Gina Elise, at the Hollywood American Legion.

(Photo courtesy of @markharper147)

Roger that, Colonel. So, when do we get to see the book of all the Pin-Up pictures?

GE: A coffee table book? I’ve thought about that! Our supporters have asked me to do a coffee table book before. I would love to see that!

Have the fans asked for anything else?

GE: Yes! I actually have an idea for a television show.

Oh really? Let’s talk about that later after I finish this amazing brownie.

GE: Any time.

Be sure to visit www.pinupsforvets.com for more info.

Articles

Engine falls off Air Force B-52 bomber while in flight

One of the eight engines powering a Boeing B-52 bomber flying over Minot Air Force Base on Wednesday quite literally fell right off the aircraft.


The unarmed aircraft, which was on a training flight at the North Dakota base, landed safely and none of the crew were injured, an Air Force spokesman told Defense News.

The service has already initiated an investigation into what went wrong. All crew members of a B-52 that crashed in May 2016 escaped without injury, though a 2008 crash killed all six crew members on board.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class J.T. Armstrong

The B-52 is a long-range, heavy bomber jet aircraft powered by eight Pratt Whitney engines. It was first introduced in 1955, though it has continually been upgraded and maintained.

The Air Force has just over 75 B-52s still in service today, which are slated to last into 2040, according to Defense News.

The B-21 Long Range Strike Bomber is expected to replace the aging B-52 fleet once it’s introduced some time in the mid-2020s.

MIGHTY TRENDING

GNC is closing 248 stores after filing for bankruptcy. Here’s the full list.

GNC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Tuesday night, announcing that it expects to close between 800 and 1,200 stores while on the hunt for a buyer for its business. The vitamins and supplements retailer had about 7,300 stores as of the end of March.

In a letter to shoppers, GNC said the COVID-19 pandemic “created a situation where we were unable to accomplish our refinancing and the abrupt change in the operating environment had a dramatic negative impact on our business.”


GNC identified 248 stores that would close imminently as part of the restructuring process. Stores are closing in 42 states, as well as in Puerto Rico and Canada.

Here are the first of the locations GNC plans to close, arranged alphabetically by state: 

Alabama:

Quintard Mall, 700 Quintard Drive, Oxford, AL

Arizona:

Flagstaff Mall, 4650 E 2 N Hwy 89, Flagstaff, AZ

Arrowhead Town Center, 7700 West Arrowhead Towne, Glendale, AZ

Madera Village, 9121 E. Tanque Verde Rd, Suite 115, Tucson, AZ

Arkansas:

Benton Commons, 1402 Military Road, Benton, AR

Northwest Arkansas Plaza, 4201 North Shiloh Dr, Fayetteville, AR

The Mall at Turtle Creek, 3000 East Highland Ave, Space # 309, Jonesboro, AR

Park Plaza, 6000 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR

North Park Village Shopping Center, 103 North Park Dr, Monticello, AR

McCain Mall Shopping Center, 3929 McCain Blvd, North Little Rock, AR

California:

Brawley Gateway, Brawley, CA

Rancho Marketplace Shopping Center, Burbank, CA

La Costa Town Square, 7615 Via Campanile Suite, Carlsbad, CA

Centrepointe Plaza, 1100 Mount Vernon Ave, Suite B, Colton, CA

Mountain Gate Plaza, 160 W. Foothill Parkway, #106, Corona, CA

Town Place, 787 1st Street, Gilroy, CA

Victoria Gardens, 12379 S Main St., Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Monterey Marketplace, Rancho Mirage, CA

Red Bluff Shopping Center, 925 South Main Street, Red Bluff, CA

Tierrasanta Town Center, San Diego, CA

Grayhawk Plaza, 20701 N. Scotsdale Rd, Suite 105, Scottsdale, AZ

Buena Park Mall, 8312 On The Mall, Buena Park, CA

East Bay Bridge Center, 3839 East Emery Street, Emeryville, CA

Vintage Faire Mall, 3401 Dale Road, Modesto, CA

Huntington Oaks Shopping Center, 514 W. Huntington Drive, Box 1106, Monrovia, CA

Del Monte Shopping Center, 350 Del Monte S.C., Monterey, CA

Antelope Valley Mall, 1233 Rancho Vista Blvd, Palmdale, CA

Town Country Village, 855 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, CA

Rancho Bernardo Town Center, Rancho Bernardo, CA

Rocklin Commons, 5194 Commons Drive 107, Rocklin, CA

Westfield Shoppingtown Mainplace, 2800 North Main Street, Suite 302, Santa Ana, CA

Gateway Plaza Shopping Center, 580b River St, Suite B, Santa Cruz, CA

Santa Rosa Plaza, 600 Santa Rosa Plaza, Suite 2032, Santa Rosa, CA

The Promenade Mall, 40820 Winchester Road, Temecula, CA

West Valley Mall, 3200 N. Naglee Rd., Suite 240, Tracy, CA

Union Square Marketplace, Union City, CA

Riverpoint Marketplace, West Sacramento, CA

Yucaipa Valley Center, 33676 Yucaipa Blvd, Yucaipa, CA

Colorado:

Chapel Hills Mall, 1710 Briargate Blvd at Jamboree Drive, Colorado Springs, CO

The Citadel, 750 Citadel Drive East, Space 1036, Colorado Springs, CO

River Landing, 3480 Wolverine Dr, Montrose, CO

Monument Marketplace, 15954 Jackson Creek Pkwy, Monument, CO

Central Park Plaza, 1809 Central Park Dr., Steamboat Springs, CO

Larkridge Shopping Center, 16560 N. Washington St, Thornton, CO

Woodland Park Plaza, 1115 E US Hwy 24, Woodland Park, CO

Connecticut:

The Plaza At Burr Corners, 1131 Tolland Pike, Manchester, CT

Delaware:

Dover Mall, 1365 N. Dupont Highway, Dover, DE

Gateway West Shopping Center, 1030 Forest Ave, Dover, DE

Rockford Shops, 1404 North Dupont St, Wilmington, DE

Florida:

Boynton Beach Mall, 801 N Congress St, Suite 763, Boynton Beach, FL

Clearwater Plaza, 1283 S. Missouri Ave, Clearwater, FL

Coral Square, 9295 West Atlantic Blvd, Coral Springs, FL

Dupont Lakes Shopping Center, 2783 Elkcam Blvd, Deltona, FL

The Shops @ Mission Lakes, 5516 South State Rd 7, Space # 128, Lake Worth, FL

Wickham Corners Shopping, 1070 North Wickham Road, Unit 106, Melbourne, FL

Shoppes Of River Landing, Miami, FL

Coastland Mall, 2034 Tamiam Trail North, Naples, FL

Orlando Fashion Square, 3451 E Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL

Oviedo Marketplace, 1385 Oviedo Marketplace B, Oviedo, FL

Gulf View Square Mall, 9409 Us 19 North, Port Richey, FL

University Mall, 12232 University Square C, Tampa, FL

Georgia:

The Mall @ Stonecrest, 8000 Mall Parkway, Lithonia, GA

Walnut Creek Plaza, 1475 Gray Highway, Macon, GA

Horizon Village, 2855 Lawrenceville Suwanee, Suite 740, Suwanee, GA

Merchant’s Square, 414 South Main Street, Swainsboro, GA

Idaho:

Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd. Suite 1206, Nampa, ID

Illinois:

Bannockburn Green, 2569 Waukegan Rd, Bannockburn, IL

University Mall, 1225 University Mall, Carbondale, IL

244 State Street, Chicago, IL

Stony Island Plaza, 1623 E 95th St, Chicago, IL

Country Club Plaza, 4285 W 167th St, Country Club, IL

South Shoppes, 2725 IL Route 26 S, Freeport, IL

Lincolnwood Town Ctr, 3333 West Touhy Av, Lincolnwood, IL

Cross County Mall, 700 Broadway East, Mattoon, IL

McHenry Plaza, 1774 N. Richmond Road, McHenry, IL

Orland Square Mall, 852 Orland Square, Orland Park, IL

Peru Mall, 3940 Rt 251, Space #E-9, Peru, IL

Northland Mall, 2900 E Lincolnway, Sterling, IL

Eden’s Plaza, 3232 Lake Avenue, Wilmette, IL

Indiana:

Putnam Plaza, 35 Putnam Place, Greencastle, IN

Nora Plaza, 1300 East 86th Street, Indianapolis, IN

Fairview Center, 556 Fairview Center, Kendallville, IN

South Point Plaza, 3189 State Rd 3 S, New Castle, IN

Iowa:

Asbury Plaza, 2565 Northwest Arterial, Dubuque, IA

Old Capitol Center, 201 Clinton Street, Iowa City, IA

Crossroads Center, 2060 Crossroads Blvd, Waterloo, IA

Kansas:

Walmart Center, 2504 South Santa Fe Dr, Chanute, KS

E 17th Ave Retail, Hutchinson, KS

Hy Vee Shops, 4000 W 6th Street, Lawrence, KS

Town Center Plaza, 4837 West 117th Street, Leawood, KS

West Ridge Mall, 1801 Wanamaker Rd., Topeka, KS

Kentucky:

Florence Mall, 2122 Florence Mall Space #2124, Florence, KY

Louisiana:

Piere Bossier Mall #520, 2950 East Texas Ave., Bossier City, LA

Broussard Village Shopping Center, 1212 D Albertson Pkwy, Broussard, LA

Prien Lake Mall, 484 West Prien Road, Space G-17b, Lake Charles, LA

Maine:

Bangor Mall, 663 Stillwater Avenue, Bangor, ME

Maryland:

Brandywine Crossing, 15902 E Crain Hwy, Brandywine, MD

Washington Center, 20 Grand Corner Avenue, Suite D, Gaithersburg, MD

St. Charles Towne Ctr, 1110 Mall Circle, Suite 6194, Waldorf, MD

Massachusetts:

Auburn Mall, 385 Southbridge St, Auburn, MA

Liberty Tree Mall, 100 Independence Way, Danvers, MA

Walpole Mall, 90 Providence Hwy, East Walpole, MA

Riverside Landing, New Bedford, MA

Emerald Square Mall, 999 South Washington Street, Box 111, North Attleboro, MA

Eastfield Mall, Boston Rd, Unit B11, Springfield, MA

Michigan:

Briarwood Mall, 850 Briarwood Circle, Ann Arbor, MI

Caro Shopping Center, 1530 West Caro Road, Caro, MI

The Marketplace Shoppes, Greenville, MI

Livonia Plaza, 30983 Five Mile Road, Livonia, MI

The Village Of Rochester Hills, 136 N Adams Road, Space #B136, Rochester Hills, MI

Forum @ Gateways, 44625 Mound Road, Mound M-59, Sterling Heights, MI

Minnesota:

Andover Marketplace, Andover, MN

Burnsville Center, 1030 Burnsville Center, Burnsville, MN

Southdale Center, 2525 Southdale Center, Edina, MN

Five Lakes Center, 334 South State St, Fairmont, MN

Midway Shopping Center, 1470 University Ave W, St. Paul, MN

Kandi Mall, 1605 1st St S, Willmar, MN

Mississippi:

Northpark Mall, 1200 East County Line Road, Space 159, Ridgeland, MS

Missouri:

West Park Mall, 3049 Route K, Cape Girardeau, MO

Chesterfield Commons, 204 THF Blvd, Chesterfield, MO

Battlefield Mall, Space #337, 2825 South Glenstone, Springfield, MO

Nebraska:

One Osborne Place, Hastings, NE

Nevada:

The Summit Sierra, 13987 South Virginia Street, Space 700, Reno, NV

New Hampshire:

Walmart Plaza, 1458 Lakeshore Rd, Gilford, NH

New Jersey:

Diamond Springs, 41 Diamond Spring Rd., Denville, NJ

The Shoppes At Union Hill, 3056 State Route 10, Denville, NJ

American Dream, 1 American Dream Way, East Rutherford, NJ

Menlo Park Shopping Center, 29 Menlo Park, Edison, NJ

302 Washington St, Hoboken, NJ

The Wall Towne Center, 2437 Route 34, Manasquan, NJ

Town Brooks Commons, 840 ROUTE 35 S, Middletown, NJ

Mall @ Short Hills, Rt 24 J.f. Kennedy Pkw, Short Hills, NJ

Tri-City Plaza, Toms River, NJ

Willingboro Plaza, 4364 Route 130 North, Willingboro, NJ

New Mexico:

Cottonwood Mall, 10000 Coors Bypass Nw, Space #d205, Albuquerque, NM

New York:

Deer Park Commons, 506 Commack Road, Deer Park, NY

Genesee Valley Shopping Center, 4290 Lakeville Rd, Geneseo, NY

Northgate Plaza, 3848 Dewey Ave, Greece, NY

Johnstown Mall, 236 North Comrie Ave, Johnstown, NY

Chautauqua Mall, 318 East Fairmont, Lakewood, NY

360 Eighth Ave, New York, NY

100 Elizabeth Street, New York, NY

163 E 125th St, New York, NY

Staten Island Mall, 2655 Richmond Avenue, Staten Island, NY

Green Acres Mall, 1134 Green Acres Mall, Valley Stream, NY

Eastview Mall, 7979 Victor-Pittsford Road, Victor, NY

North Carolina:

The Arboretum Shopping Center, 3339 Pineville Matthews, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC

Blakeney Shop Center, Charlotte, NC

Southpark Mall, 4400 Sharon Rd, Charlotte, NC

Four Seasons Town Center, 346 Four Seasons Mall, Greensboro, NC

Cross Pointe Center, 1250-l Western Blvd, Jacksonville, NC

Ohio:

Dayton Mall, 2700 Miamisburg Centerville Rd, Dayton, OH

Ohio River Plaza, 13 Ohio River Plaza, Township Road 11 Sr 7, Gallipolis, OH

Indian Mound Mall, 771 S 30th St, Heath, OH

The Shoppes Of Mason, 5220 Kings Mills Road, Mason, OH

Heritage Crossing, 3113 Heritage Green, Monroe, OH

The Town Center At Levis, 4135 Levis Commons Blvd, Perrysburg, OH

Miami Valley Centre, 987 E. Ash Street, Piqua, OH

Sandusky Mall, 4314 Milan Road, Sandusky, OH

Southpark Mall, 500 Southpark Center, Strongsville, OH

Crocker Park, 137 Market Street, West Lake, OH

Meadow Park Plaza, 1659 Rombach Ave, Wilmington, OH

Oklahoma:

Neilson Square, 3322 W Owwn K Garriott Road, Enid, OK

Oregon:

Cascade Station, 10207 NE Cascades Pkwy, Portland, OR

Seaside Factory Outlet, 1111 North Roosevelt, Seaside, OR

Pennsylvania:

South Mall, 3300 Lehigh Street, Allentown, PA

Logan Valley Mall, 300 Logan Valley Mall, Bk 4, Altoona, PA

Clearview Mall, Route 8, Butler, PA

Clearfield Mall, 1800 Daisy Street, Clearfield, PA

Neshaminy Mall, 707 Neshaminy Mall, Cornwell Heights, PA

Cranberry Mall, 20111 Route 19. Freedom, Cranberry, PA

Oxford Valley Mall, 2300 E Lincoln Highway, Langhorne, PA

Hyde Park Plaza, 451 Hyde Park Road, Leechburg, PA

Monroeville Mall, Monroeville, PA

Shoppes At Montage, 2105 Shoppes Blvd, Moosic, PA

Edgmont Square Shopping Center, Newtown Square, PA

Pine Creek Center, 195 Blazier Drive, Unit 6, Pittsburgh, PA

Springfield Mall, 1200 Baltimore Pike, Springfield, PA

Lehigh Valley Mall, 215 Lehigh Valley Mall, Whitehall, PA

3097 Willow Grove Mall, 2500 Moreland Road, Willow Grove, PA

Wynnewood Shopping Center, 50 East Wynnewood Road, Wynnewood, PA

York Galleria, 2899 Whiteford Rd, York, PA

Rhode Island:

Hunt River Commons, 72 Frenchtown Road, North Kingston, RI

Diamond Hill Plaza, 1790 Diamond Hill Road, Woonsocket, RI

South Carolina:

Anderson Mall, 3139 N Main, Anderson, SC

Haywood Mall, 700 Haywood Road, Greenville, SC

North Hills Shopping Center, 2435 E North Street, Suite 1115, Greenville, SC

Myrtle Beach Mall, Myrtle Beach, SC

Shoppes At Stonecrest, 1149 Stonecrest Blvd, Tega Cay, SC

Tennessee:

University Commons, 2459 University Commons W, B160, Knoxville, TN

Three Star Shopping Center, 1410 Sparta Road, McMinnville, TN

Southland Mall, 1215 East Shelby Drive, Memphis, TN

Wolfchase Galleria, Memphis, TN

Texas:

Alamo Corners, 1451 Durenta Avenue, Suite 3, Alamo, TX

Barton Creek Square, 2901 Capital Of Texas Hwy, Austin, TX

Sunland Park Mall, 750 Sunland Park Drive, Space J4, El Paso, TX

North East Mall, 1101 Melbourn Road, Suite #3090, Hurst, TX

Sheppard Square, 2055 Westheimer, Suite 160, Houston, TX

Ingram Park Mall, 6301 Northwest Loop 410, San Antonio, TX

Rivercenter Mall, 849 East Commerce Street, San Antonio, TX

Virginia:

Charlottesville Fashion Square, 1588 Fashion Square Mall, Charlottesville, VA

Franklin Commons, 144 Council Drive, Franklin, VA

Dulles 28, 22000 Dulles Retail Plaza, Ste 154, Sterling, VA

Maple Avenue Shopping Ctr, 335 Maple Avenue East, Vienna, VA

Washington:

Everett Mall, 1402 SE Everett Mall, Suite #225, Everett, WA

Village At Redmond Ridge, Redmond, WA

The Joule, 509 Broadway, Seattle, WA

Jefferson Square, 4722 West 42nd Ave SW, Seattle, WA

Spokane Valley Mall, 14700 E Indiana Avenue, Spokane Valley, WA

Green Firs Shopping Center, University Place, WA

Vancouver Plaza, 7809 Vancouver Plaza #160, Vancouver, WA

Wisconsin:

Bay Park Square, 311-a Bay Park Square, Green Bay, WI

East Town Mall, 2350 East Mason Street, Green Bay, WI

Janesville Mall, 2500 Milton Ave, Space 117, Janesville, WI

The Shops Of Grand Avenue, Milwaukee, WI

West Virginia:

Greenbrier Valley Mall, 75 Seneca Trail US Route 219, Fairlea, WV

Puerto Rico:

Plaza Guayama, Guayama, PR

Condominio Reina De Casti, 100 Paseo Gilberto, San Juan, PR

Centro Gran Caribe, Carretera #2 Km 29.7, Vega Alta, PR

Canada:

Marlborough Mall, Calgary, AB, Canada

Shawnessy Town Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada

Bonnie Doon Shopping Centre, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Bower Place, Red Deer, AB, Canada

Sevenoaks Shopping Centre, 32900 South Fraser Way, Abbotsford, BC, Canada

Brentwood Towne Centre, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Eagle Landing Sc, 706-8249 Eagle Landing Pk, Chilliwack, BC, Canada

Dawson Mall, 11000 8th Street, Dawson Creek, BC, Canada

Willowbrook Shopping Center, Langley, BC, Canada

Queensborough Landing, New Westminster, BC, Canada

Mayfair Shopping Centre, Victoria, BC, Canada

Brandon Shoppers, 1570-18th St Unit 87, Brandon, MB, Canada

Smartcentres Corner Brook, Corner Brook, NL, Canada

Georgian Mall, 509 Bayfield Street, Barrie, ON, Canada

Lynden Park Mall, 84 Lynden Road, Brantford, ON, Canada

Cataraqui Town Center, 945 Gardiners Rd, Kingston, ON, Canada

Williamsburg Town Centre, Kitchener, ON, Canada

Masonville Place, London, ON, Canada

Markham Town Centre, 8601 Warden Ave, Markham, ON, Canada

Creekside Crossing, 1560 Dundas St E, Mississauga, ON, Canada

Erin Mills Town Centre, Mississauga, ON, Canada

Westside Market Village, 520 Riddell Road, Orangeville, ON, Canada

Markham Steeles Shopping Centre, 5981 Steeles Avenue East, Scarborough, ON, Canada

Morningside Crossing, Scarborough, ON, Canada

New Sudbury Centre, 1349 Lasalle Blvd, Sudbury, ON, Canada

St Claire Runnymede Rd, 2555 St Clair Ave West, Toronto, ON, Canada

Colussus Centre, 31 Colussus Dr, Vaughan, ON, Canada

Laurier Quebec, 2700 Laurier Boulevard, Quebec, PQ, Canada

Galeries Rive Nord, 100 Boulevare Brien, Repentigny, PQ, Canada

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY HISTORY

This Vietnam War bridge raid was a lesson in adaptive air combat

It was like trying to hit a needle in a haystack, kill a fly with a sledgehammer, or whatever analogy you prefer for using brute force to apply surgical precision in the middle of a swirling ambush.

By analogy and history, the attack on Dragon’s Jaw is a bizarre mismatch of weapons to mission. It is another hard lesson for U.S. air power in the ’60’s. Several decades of evolving doctrine and aircraft development have led the U.S. Air Force in a different direction from how air wars will actually be fought in the future. Instead of long range strategic nuclear attack, tactical precision anti-insurgent strike is the emerging mission. The U.S. will continue to learn that hard lesson on this day.


By any measure this is an impressive air armada: Sixty-six advanced supersonic fighters and strike aircraft from America’s “Century Series”. The main strike package is 46 Republic F-105 Thunderchiefs with massive bomb loads. The defensive escort is 21 North American F-100 Super Sabres holstering a covey of air-to-air missiles. The strike and escort fighters are supported by an enormous number of tanker, surveillance, rescue and reconnaissance planes. They all have one objective: to kill “The Dragon”.

The Dragon is the Thanh Hóa Bridge, near the geographic center of North Vietnam. The North Vietnamese nicknamed the bridge “Hàm Rồng” or “Dragon’s Jaw” since its massive steel and concrete construction seem like a row of sturdy teeth set in the mouth of a deadly dragon. The Dragon itself is made up of one of the most sophisticated integrated air defense networks on earth modeled closely after the most sophisticated, the Soviet Union’s.

Ironically, if this same task force had been attacking the Soviet Union with nuclear weapons their results would have almost certainly been better. That is the mission these aircraft were actually designed for. But the Dragon is a small, critical target, and an elusive one. Even though it’s not an all-out nuclear war with the Red Menace, the Dragon must be slayed in the ongoing proxy war that is Vietnam.

The Thanh Hóa Bridge would be a tough target to hit even without an advanced, integrated network of radar guided anti-aircraft guns, SAMs and MiGs surrounding it. The bridge has only a single one-meter wide railroad track on its deck. It is 540 feet long and 54 feet wide at its widest point. From the attack altitude of about 10,000 feet it is difficult to see well at high-speed.

The flight of F-105 Thunderchiefs break into sections of four aircraft each. Today they are armed with 750 pound “dumb” bombs. The day before a nearly identical strike also failed to destroy the Dragon’s Jaw when the Thunderchiefs attacked with crude AGM-12 Bullpup guided missiles and 750 pound dumb bombs. The AGM-12 missiles, an early attempt at “smart” weapons, failed significantly. Remarkably, even though some of the 750 pounders did hit the bridge, they had little effect. The first attempt at breaking the Dragon’s Jaw on April 3rd failed spectacularly. The bridge proved sturdier than expected, the weapons less precise than hoped.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
Front view of the F-105.
(US Air Force photo)

Having abandoned the AGM-12 Bullpup missiles from the day before the F-105 Thunderchiefs would strike with only dumb bombs today.

The F-105 was originally designed to carry a nuclear weapon enclosed within its streamlined fuselage using an internal bomb bay. It was supposed to attack a target from low altitude at Mach 2, “toss” the nuclear weapon at the target in a pop-up attack, and escape at twice the speed of sound.

Today the big F-105 “Thuds” lug a junkyard of dumb bombs under their sleek swept wings and below their sinewy Coke-bottle curved fuselage. The yardsale of external bombs and bomb racks creates enormous drag on the needle-nosed “Thud”, slowing it to below supersonic speed and making it vulnerable.

As predictably as a firing line of advancing redcoat soldiers facing off against Native American insurgents in the Revolutionary War, the Thunderchiefs returned the very next day, marching across the aerial battlefield in broad daylight. The North Vietnamese had been ready the day before. Today they were angry, battle hardened and ready.

According to historical accounts ranging from Air Force Magazine to Wikipedia, four of eight lightweight, nimble, subsonic MiG-17s (NATO codename “Fresco”) of the North Vietnamese 921st “Sao Do” (Red Star) Fighter Regiment led by North Vietnamese flight leader Trần Hanh visually acquired an attack formation of four F-105Ds at 10:30 AM.

The Thunderchiefs were just starting to drop their bombs and already committed to their attack run. Flight leader Trần Hanh ordered his wingman, Pham Giay, to cover his attack on the F-105s. Hanh dove in through light cloud cover, achieving complete surprise. He opened fire on the F-105 with his heavy 37mm cannon at extremely close range, only 400 meters. Having attacked from above and behind in a classic ACM (Air Combat Maneuvering) scenario, Hanh preserved energy and positioning. The hapless F-105, piloted by USAF Major Frank E. Bennett of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, was pummeled by the MiG’s cannon shells. It erupted in a comet of plunging fire and hurtled downward toward the Gulf of Tonkin. Major Bennett did not survive.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
North Vietnamese MiG-17 pilot Tran Hanh shown after the war.

A small, nimble, lightweight fighter had just gotten the better of a large, heavily loaded fighter-bomber despite having a substantial escort from F-100 Super Sabres. The Super Sabre fighter escort was out of position to respond to the MiG-17 ambush. A brutally hard lesson in the future of air combat was in session.

The melee continued when another North Vietnamese MiG-17 pilot reportedly named “Le Minh Huan” downed a second F-105D, this one piloted by USAF Capt. J. A. Magnusson. Capt. Magnusson reportedly radioed that he was heading for the Gulf of Tonkin after being hit. He struggled to maintain control of his heavily damaged Thunderchief as he tried to escape North Vietnam. Capt. Magnusson was forced to eject twenty miles from the island of Hon Me, and was eventually listed as missing in action, then killed in action after a 48-hour search turned up nothing.

Painfully, the U.S. Air Force confirmed they had lost two F-105s and pilots in the second attack on the Dragon’s Jaw. Even worse, the bridge remained intact, a straight, iron grin at the futile attack of the Americans.

After the failed F-105 strikes and aircraft losses the Americans were desperate to destroy the Dragon’s Jaw bridge. Author Walter J Boyne wrote in Air Force Magazine that the U.S. developed a bizarre, massive pancake-shaped bomb weighing two and a half tons and measuring eight feet in diameter but only thirty inches thick. The gigantic, explosive Frisbee was dropped from the back of a lumbering C-130 Hercules transport and was intended to float down river toward the bridge where it would be detonated by a magnetic fuse. Several of the weapons were actually dropped, one C-130 was lost.

The bridge remained intact.

Early laser guided bombs were also employed against the Dragon’s Jaw with modest success. An attack on May 13, 1972 by a flight of 14 F-4 Phantoms used early “smart” bombs and actually knocked the bridge surface off its pilings, briefly rendering it inoperable and forcing repairs.

But the bridge still stood.

Attacks on the Dragon’s Jaw continued until October 6, 1972. A flight of four Vought A-7 Corsair attack aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS America (CV-66) was finally successful in breaking the bridge in half. They used the AGM-62 Walleye guided bomb and 500-pound Mk.84 general purpose “dumb” bombs. The bridge was finally severed at its center piling.

Author Walter Boyne wrote about the final strike, “At long last, after seven years, 871 sorties, tremendous expenditure in lives, 11 lost aircraft, and a bewildering array of expended munitions, the Dragon’s Jaw was finally broken.” The key lesson from the brutal campaign to destroy the Dragon’s Jaw was that tactics and equipment need to be adaptable and precise in the modern battlespace.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
USAF reconnaissance photo of the Thanh Hu00f3a Bridge in North Vietnam.
(US Air Force photo)

The F-105 Thunderchief was an impressive aircraft, but was forced into a brutal baptism of fire over Vietnam during an era when air combat was in transition. As a result, the F-105 suffered heavy losses. The history of the aircraft went on the include an unusual accident with the U.S. Air Force Flight Demonstration Team, The Thunderbirds. On May 9, 1964 Thunderbird Two, an F-105B piloted by USAF Captain Eugene J. Devlin, snapped in half during the pitch-up for landing at the old Hamilton Air Base in California. The Thunderchief only flew in six official flight demonstrations with the Thunderbirds.

Interestingly, and perhaps ominously, the U.S. Air Force’s F-35A Lightning II shares a remarkable number of similarities with the Republic F-105 Thunderchief used in the raid on the Dragon’s Jaw in 1965.

According to author Dr. Carlo Kopp, the F-35A dimensions are oddly similar to the F-105. But among several critical differences is the wing surface area, with the F-35A having larger wing surface area and the resultant lower wing loading than the F-105. Other major differences are the F-35A’s low observable technology and greatly advanced avionics, data collecting, processing and sharing capability. Finally, the F-35A is purpose-built for a wide range of mission sets, whereas the F-105 was predominantly a high-speed, low-level nuclear strike aircraft poorly suited for conventional strike.

Lessons learned from the F-105 strike on the Dragon’s Jaw, the success of the nimble, lightweight North Vietnamese MiG-17s and the need for better precision strike capability are now deeply ingrained in U.S. Air Force doctrine. But revisiting this story is a vital part of understanding the evolving mission of the air combat warfighter and the high cost of failing to adapt in the constantly evolving aerial battlespace.

MIGHTY TRENDING

The Air Force needs a new A-10 mechanic

The U.S. Air Force is searching for a new company to rebuild wings on the A-10 ground-attack plane after ending an arrangement with Boeing Co., officials said.


The service plans to launch a new competition for the re-winging work and award a contract sometime after Congress appropriates full-year funding for fiscal 2018, which began Oct. 1, they said. (The government is currently running on a short-term funding measure known as a continuing resolution, which lasts through Feb. 8.)

During a speech in Washington, D.C., Gen. Mike Holmes, the head of Air Combat Command, touched on the contract with Boeing and the planned future deal.

“The previous contract that we had was with Boeing, and it kind of came to the end of its life for cost and for other reasons,” he said. “It was a contract that was no longer cost-effective for Boeing to produce wings under, and there were options there that we weren’t sure where we were going to go, and so now we’re working through the process of getting another contract.”

When contacted by Military.com for additional details, Ann Stefanek, a spokeswoman for the Air Force at the Pentagon, confirmed the planned contract will be “a new and open competition.”

Also read: Everything you need to know about the A-10 Thunderbolt II

Boeing has been upgrading A-10 wings for the Air Force since June 2007, according to Cassaundra Bantly, a spokeswoman for the Chicago-based company. The contract calls for replacing up to 242 sets of wings, and the company has so far received orders to replace 173, she said.

“Boeing stands ready with a demonstrated understanding of the technical data package, tooling, supply chain, and manufacturing techniques to offer the lowest risk option and quickest timeline for additional wings for the A-10 Warthog,” Bantly said in an email.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

She added, “The ordering period on the current contract has expired, so the U.S. Air Force is working on an acquisition strategy for more wings. Boeing would welcome a follow-on effort for additional A-10 wings.

“We’re currently in the process of delivering the remaining wings on our contract,” Bantly said.

During a briefing at the Brookings Institution, Holmes said the Air Force requested funding in the fiscal 2018 budget to continue rebuilding wings on the A-10 Thunderbolt II, also known as the Warthog. The aircraft, popular among ground troops though a budget target for previous leaders, recently returned to Afghanistan to conduct close air support missions.

Stefanek recently told Military.com the Air Force plans to use $103 million authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act, which sets policy goals and spending limits for the fiscal year, to award a contract for the A-10 work, establish a new wing production line and produce four additional wings.

That work “is all that money funds,” she told Military.com last week.

Further reading: The Air Force seems to have persuaded Congress to pay up for the A-10

Once the Air Force receives the funding, the competition can be announced. Whichever defense contractor wins the contract will pay for the startup to include four sets of new wings.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
An A-10 Thunderbolt II returns to mission after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker over the skies of Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, May 8, 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. William Greer)

However, because the wings will be considered a “new start” program, the work can’t begin under a continuing resolution — the program is dependent on the fiscal 2018 and succeeding 2019 appropriations.

“In the [FY]19 program that we’re working, we also buy more wings,” Holmes said.

With a new contract, like “all new contracts” the first set of wings will be expensive as engineers work through the design phase, Holmes said, referring to working through the production line kinks that come at the start of programs.

How many more A-10s will get new wings still remains in limbo.

Air Force officials have said the service can commit to maintaining wings for six of its nine A-10 combat squadrons through roughly 2030.

“As far as exactly how many of the 280 or so A-10s that we have that we’ll maintain forever, I’m not sure, that’ll depend on a Department of Defense decision and our work with Congress,” Holmes said.

On the exact squadron number, he clarified, “It’s not a decision that we have to make right away. It’ll depend on what we have, what we need and what’s useful on the battlefield year-to-year as we go through it.”

Of the 281 A-10s currently in the inventory, 173 have already been outfitted or are in the process of being outfitted with new wings (though one of the newly re-winged planes was destroyed in a crash), Stefanek said. That leaves 109 aircraft remaining in the inventory still slated to receive the upgrades, she said.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14
US Air Force members troubleshoot an electronic error on an A-10 Thunderbolt II on April 25, 2007, on the flightline at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The service has struggled with its message on how it plans to keep the fleet flying since the aircraft’s retirement was delayed until at least 2022.

Facing financial pressure, the Air Force — driven by spending caps known as sequestration — made multiple attempts in recent years to retire the Warthog to save an estimated $4 billion over five years and to free up maintainers for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the stealthy fifth-generation fighter jet designed to replace the A-10 and legacy fighters.

Holmes added that as more F-35 amass themselves across U.S. bases, “I won’t be able to just add those on top of the [fighter] squadrons that I have.”

Related: Watch how the A-10 Warthog’s seven-barrel autocannon works

The service is looking to grow its fighter fleet to stay competitive against near-peer threats such as Russia and China. To do so, it believes it needs to increase its number of fighter squadrons from 55 to 60.

But that means it needs a variety of aircraft to sustain the fight, not just a regurgitation of old planes. Whether this means the Air Force is still weighing retiring its F-15C/D fleet sometime in the mid-2020s is unclear. Holmes did not speak to specific aircraft fleets when addressing fighter requirements.

“We’ll have to make some decisions” of what kind of aircraft to move or divest, he said. Preferred basing for F-35 bases is old F-16 Fighting Falcon bases, he said. The Air Force has been moving Vipers around various bases or into new training units since the F-35 has come online.

More BRRRRRT: Here’s what’s next for the A-10

— Editor’s note: This story was updated to add comments from the Boeing spokeswoman beginning in the sixth paragraph.

— Oriana Pawlyk can be reached at oriana.pawlyk@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at Oriana0214.

MIGHTY TACTICAL

The ‘ribbon gun’ inventor answers our top questions

So, we wrote about that “four-barrel” rifle last week and posed a few questions to the inventor, Martin Grier, in an email. He got back to us that day with our initial query and has now responded to some more of the questions we posited in the original article. His answers make us even more excited about the weapon’s promise, assuming that everything holds true through testing in Army labs and the field.


America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

The FD Munitions L5 rifle prototype has five bores and few moving parts. The Army has requested a four-bore version for testing.

(YouTube/FD Munitions)

First, a bit of terminology. The weapon is a rifle. Most people have described it as having four barrels, but it’s really a barrel with four bores (the original prototype had five). The inventor prefers to call it a “ribbon gun,” which we’ll go ahead and use from here on out.

Just be aware that “ribbon gun” means a firearm with multiple bores that can fire multiple multiple rounds per trigger squeeze or one round at a time. The bullets are spinning as they exit the weapon, stabilizing them in flight like shots from a conventional rifle.

If you haven’t read our original article on the weapon, that might help you get caught up. It’s available at this link.

So, some of our major questions about the rifle were how the design, if adopted, would affect an infantryman’s combat load, their effective rate of fire, and how the rounds affect each other in flight when fired in bursts. We’re going to take on those topics one at a time, below.

Weight

How much weight would an infantryman be carrying if equipped with the new weapon? Grier says it should be very similar, as the charge blocks which hold the ammunition are actually very light

“In practice, Charge Block ammo, shot-for-shot, is roughly equivalent to conventional cartridge ammo,” he said, “depending on which caliber it’s compared to. It’s lighter than 7.62 and slightly heavier than 5.56. It outperforms both.”

Since the weapon fires 6mm rounds, that means the per-shot weight is right where you would expect with conventional rounds. The prototype weapon weighs 6.5 pounds. That’s less than an M16 and right on for the base M4.

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The L4m ammo blocks feature four firing chambers and their rounds, stacked vertically. The blocks can clip together in stacks and be loaded quickly. Excess blocks able to be snapped off and returned to the shooter’s pouch easily.

(Copyright FD Munitions, reprinted with permission)

And those blocks of ammo provide a lot of benefits since they can withstand 80,000 PSI. That lets designers opt for higher muzzle velocities if they wish, extending range and increasing lethality. For comparison, the M4 and M16 put out about 52,000 PSI of chamber pressure.

Even better, the blocks snap together and can be loaded as a partial stack. So, if you fire six blocks and want to reload, there’s no need to empty the rifle. Just pull the load knob and shove in your spare stack. The weapon will accept six blocks, and you can snap off the spares and put them back into your pouch.

Rate of fire

But what about effective rates of fire?

Well, the biggest hindrance on a rifle’s effective rate of fire is the heat buildup. Grier says that’s been taken care of, thanks to the materials used in the barrel as well as the fact that each chamber is only used once per block.

“In the L4, … the chamber is integral with the Charge Block,” he said. “Every four shots, the Block is ejected, along with its heat, and a new, cold one takes its place. The barrel is constructed with a thin, hard-alloy core, and a light-alloy outer casing that acts as a finned heat sink. In continuous operation, the barrel will reach an elevated temperature, then stabilize (like a piston engine). Each bore in the L4 carries only a 25 percent duty cycle, spreading the heat load and quadrupling barrel life.”

FD Munitions expects that the military version of the L4 would have a stabilized temperature during sustained fire somewhere around 300-400 degrees Fahrenheit, but they took pains to clarify that it’s a projected data point. They have not yet tested any version of the weapon at those fire rates.

But, if it holds up, that beats the M16 during 1975 Army tests by hundreds of degrees. The M16 barrels reached temperatures of over 600 degrees while firing 10 rounds per minute. At 60-120 rounds per minute, the barrels reached temperatures of over 1,000 degrees. That’s a big part of why the military tells troops to hold their fire to 15 rounds per minute or less, except in emergencies.

All of this combines to allow an effective rate of fire somewhere between 60 and 100 shots per minute. That’s about five times more rounds per minute than a M4 or M16 can sustain. And that’s important; paratroopers in a 2008 battle died as their weapons malfunctioned. One soldier had three M4s fail while he was firing at an average rate of 14 rounds per minute.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

The guts of the weapon feature very few moving parts, a trait that should reduce the likelihood of failures in the field.

(YouTube/FD Munitions)

Do rounds affect one another mid-flight?

Sweet, so the combat load won’t be too heavy, and the weapon can spit rounds fast AF. But, if rounds are fired in volleys or bursts, will they affect each other in flight, widening the shot group?

Grier says the rounds fly close together, but have very little effect on each other in flight, remaining accurate even if you’re firing all four rounds at once.

And, four rounds at once has a special bonus when shot against ceramic armor, designed for a maximum of three hits.

“The projectiles do not affect each other in flight,” he said. “Even when fired simultaneously, tiny variations in timing because of chemical reaction rates, striker spring resonances, field decay rates, electric conductor lengths etc., ensure that the projectiles will be spaced out slightly in time along the line of sight. The side effect is that the impacts will be likewise consecutive, defeating even the best ceramic body armor.”

Meanwhile, for single shot mode, each bore can be independently zeroed when combined with an active-reticle scope. With standard mechanical sights, Grier recommends zeroing to one of the inside bores, ensuring rounds from any bore will land close to your zeroed point of impact.

Some other concerns that have arisen are things like battery life, which Grier thinks will be a non-issue in the military version. It’s expected to pack a gas-operated Faraday generator that not only can power the rifle indefinitely, but can provide juice for attachments like night vision scopes or range finders.

There’s also the question of malfunctions, which can happen in any weapon. Failure to fire will be of little consequence since you’re going to eject that chamber quickly anyway. If a barrel becomes inoperable due to some sort of fault, the fire control can simply skip that barrel, allowing the shooter to still fire 75, 50, or 25 percent of their rounds, depending on how many barrels are affected.

So, if everything goes well, this weapon could shift the balance of power when the U.S. goes squad vs. squad against other militaries. Here’s hoping the final product lives up to the hype and makes it into the hands of service members.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Coffee or Die’s very unbiased 2019 holiday gift guide

We don’t mean to alarm you, but Christmas is right around the corner. We know many of you are out there defending our freedoms on the streets of U.S. cities or in foreign countries, which makes it easy to lose track of the holidays. At Coffee or Die, we understand that time is a valuable commodity, so we took the liberty of highlighting some must-have items (coffee!) from badass companies (Black Rifle Coffee Company!) that should satisfy everyone on your list (everyone!).

Save the sweat for when your New Year’s resolution kicks in — here’s our easy-to-follow holiday gift guide.


America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Photo courtesy of Black Rifle Coffee Company.)

BRCC Holiday Bundle

Nothing says “Happy Holidays” like an image of America’s rifle decked out in twinkle lights and a hot cup of America’s coffee in a freedom-loving mug. There are other holiday coffee packages, but we can pretty much guarantee that if your loved one opens up anything besides the BRCC Holiday Bundle, they’ll be disappointed. Don’t be that guy. BRCC, or die.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Photo courtesy of Beyond Clothing Facebook page.)

Prima Loche Reversible Jacket from Beyond Clothing

For the outdoor enthusiast, staying warm in an outlayer that can withstand extreme activity is a must. Beyond Clothing has all the options for the adventure-seekers on your holiday shopping list. The Prima Loche Jacket is made of 70-denier quilted micro ripstop with durable water repellent (DWR) finish to withstand the elements. It’s also fully reversible, compressible for easy packing, and features a sweat-wicking Poloratec Alpha Insulation.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Photo courtesy of @wrm.fzt on Instagram.)

Wrm.fzy “Cowboy Advice” Tee

Our friends over at WRMFZY make some of the most unique lifestyle apparel around, with something for the whole family including kids tees and bodysuits. All of their shirts are made from 50 percent polyester, 25 percent ring-spun combed cotton, and 25 percent rayon for maximum comfort. One of our favorites is the “Cowboy Advice” Tee.

America might need to derail an Indian purchase of the T-14

(Mat Best, center, on deployment. Photo courtesy of Mat Best.)

Books by Army Rangers

Contrary to popular belief, U.S. Army Rangers are capable of stringing words together to form coherent — and even intelligible — sentences. Need proof?

This year, Black Rifle Coffee Company co-founder and vice president Mat Best added “best-selling author” to his impressive resume with the release of “Thank You For My Service.” The memoir topped several best-seller lists, including the New York Times, USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and Wall Street Journal. Best’s timely memoir provides fresh insight into the minds of the men and women on the front lines of the Global War on Terrorism. But don’t worry, this is still Mat Best we’re talking about — you’ll also be laughing your ass off.

Luke Ryan, BRCC’s social media manager, has also authored a book — or three. The former Army Ranger currently has three books available: “The Gun and the Scythe: Poetry by an Army Ranger,” “The Eighth: A Short Story,” and “The First Marauder,” which is the first installment of a three-part series. “The First Marauder” is set in a post-apocalyptic U.S. after a deadly virus wreaks havoc on the planet. The story follows Tyler Ballard, a 15-year-old boy who seeks revenge for the death of his older brother. “The Gun and the Scythe” is a poetry book written for veterans, and it explores various facets of war in a way simple narratives cannot.

Coffee or Die executive editor Marty Skovlund Jr. has also been known to put pen to paper occasionally, and his seminal work makes a worthy addition to anyone’s library. “Violence of Action” is much more than the true, first-person accounts of the 75th Ranger Regiment in the Global War on Terror. Between these pages are the heartfelt, first-hand accounts from, and about, the men who lived, fought, and died for their country, their Regiment, and each other.

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(Jack Carr’s “The Terminal List” was released in 2018; “True Believer” in July 2019.)

… and a book by a Navy SEAL

Former U.S. Navy SEAL sniper and author Jack Carr has written books so badass that even Chuck Norris can’t put them down. Jack Carr uses his 20-plus years of experience operating as a Navy SEAL to write some of the most thrilling fiction books we’ve ever read. Protagonist James Reece is on a quest for vengeance after he discovers that the ambush that claimed the lives of his SEAL team and the murder of his wife and daughters was all part of a conspiracy. The first two installments, “The Terminal List” and “True Believer,” will have you on the edge of your seat. If you can’t get enough of James Reece, Carr’s third book, “Savage Son,” is coming in April 2020.

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(Photo courtesy of Evers Forgeworks.)

The Maverick EDC from Evers Forgeworks

For the true blade lover in your life, check out Evers Forgeworks. Veteran John Evers has a passion for all things with a blade, which is apparent in his work. His hand-forged blades are as functional as they are beautiful. We are particularly impressed with the Maverick EDC, which is the perfect blade to add to your battle or duty belt, and the Maverick Hunter — fast, lightweight, and ready to serve whatever purpose you have in mind.

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(Photo courtesy of Activision.)

“Call of Duty: Modern Warfare” Reboot

The anticipated reboot of the popular “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare” video game was released in October and features new characters, new storylines that are eerily similar to real-world events, and new play modes. Developers Infinity Ward brought in Tier 1 operators to consult on the game, upping the realism and exciting for players. This is a no-brainer for the FPS gamer on your holiday shopping list.

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(Photo courtesy of Kifaru International Facebook page.)

A Kifaru International Woobie

The USGI poncho liner (woobie) is quite possibly the most popular piece of government-issued equipment on the planet. And it’s basically a baby blanket for some of our nation’s most hardened warriors. Kifaru International took this fan favorite and enhanced it to meet their demanding standards. With their proprietary RhinoSkin coating with DWR for water resistance, this woobie‘s durability is unmatched. Their Apex insulation is a continuous filament that requires no quilting, unlike the USGI version. This lack of quilting or stitching anywhere but the edges eliminates cold spots. We never leave home without ours.

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(Photo courtesy of Combat Flip Flops Facebook page.)

The Shemagh from Combat Flip Flops

Combat Flip Flops has a righteous reputation for their durable products and mindful philanthropy. While their signature product makes a great gift, this time of year isn’t exactly flip flop season in many parts of the country. The shemagh (square scarf), however, is a versatile item that can be used in many different environments. It’s perfect for that person on your list who is always looking for new and unique accessories — or is always cold.

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(Photo courtesy of High West Distillery Facebook page.)

A bottle of High West Whiskey

For the whiskey connoisseur, our friends at High West Distillery have something for everyone. From American Prairie Bourbon to Double Rye to Rendezvous Rye to Campfire — which is a blend of scotch, bourbon and rye whiskeys — there are plenty of options, and they’re all good. You may even inspire the recipient to visit the distillery in Park City, Utah, for a tour. While they’re there, they can also stop at the saloon or the Nelson Cottage, which offers coursed dinners and whiskey pairings.

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(Courtesy of STI International’s Facebook page.)

STI Staccato C pistol

STI pistols are made in America with their own unique pistol platform called the 2011. Every STI handgun is backed by a lifetime warranty and unmatched performance. We recommend the Staccato C for the everyday carrier in your life — it contains all the speed, power, and accuracy that STI is known for in a compact, easy, and comfortable-to-carry firearm.

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(Photo courtesy of Bison Union.)

Bison Union 16-oz. Buffalo Mug

Bison Union is a veteran-owned company that started out making awesome T-shirts but have added other products to their lineup over the years — like this no-nonsense 16-ounce Buffalo Mug. Each mug is handmade in Sheridan, Wyoming, by a friend of the company, who also happens to be the mother of a U.S. Army veteran. From their website, “At Bison Union Company we firmly believe coffee is one of the best ingredients for hard work each day… so stop talking and earn your coffee!”

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(Photo courtesy of Sitka Gear.)

Kelvin Active Jacket from Sitka Gear

Sitka’s motto — “Turning Clothing into Gear” — holds true in every piece that we have worn. Sitka makes the most highly functional technical hunting clothing we have ever used. One of our favorite pieces is the Kelvin Active Jacket, which can be used as a quiet outlayer to ease the chill on mild mornings or as an insulating layer in frigid temps. It’s lightweight and easily compressible, so it won’t take up much space in your pack. If you’re shopping for an outdoorsman, you can not go wrong with anything from Sitka.

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The Mission Flannel contributes to helping our furry friends find forever homes.

(Photo courtesy of Dixxon Flannel Facebook page.)

Dixxon Flannel’s Mission K-9 Charity Flannel

Check out the BRCC office on any given day of the week and there’s a good chance you’ll catch someone in Dixxon Flannel. Their flannels feature their signature D-TECH material, which makes them breathable yet durable and minimizes wrinkling. Dixxon Flannel offers apparel for men, women, and children — flannel for the whole family! Plus the Mission K-9 Charity Flannel supports an incredibly worthy cause.

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(Photo courtesy of Traeger.)

Traeger Signature BBQ Sauce

Specialty food items are a great go-to gift during the holidays. Need to fill a stocking? Need a host gift? Need to get something small for that ” or less” office gift exchange? There are plenty of options, but we like the idea of gifting something that requires a little more thought than a bottle of wine or meat-and-cheese box. In addition to their cooking implements, Traeger has a whole line of delicious sauces. We like to start with the Signature BBQ Sauce since it has the most broad appeal. If the recipient is a backyard pitmaster you know and love, there are also sweet and spicy options, depending on their taste … or you could just, you know, pony up the money to buy them a badass grill.

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(Photo courtesy of Black Rifle Coffee Company.)

BRCC Coffee Club subscription

The gift that keeps on giving, BRCC’s Coffee Club delivers high-quality coffee delivered to your door each month at a discounted rate and with free shipping. The Club keeps it simple — just choose whether you’re purchasing for home or office, pick a texture (ground, whole bean, or rounds), select your blend (or let us choose it for you!), the number of bags, and the frequency of delivery. Done! Coffee equals love, so if you really love someone, you should make sure they never run out of America’s Coffee again.

Nonprofit gifting

Want to buy awesome gifts for a loved one but also support a great cause? Check out these BRCC-favorite nonprofit store items:

Or maybe you just want to make a donation in someone’s name because they already have way more than they need and, let’s be honest, it’s just easier that way? We’re here for that, too.

Buy a Bag, Give a Bag: Our first donated bags arrive to deployed troops in Iraq

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This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.

MIGHTY HISTORY

Can you find proof of UFOs in the National Archives?

Ever wonder if we are alone in this universe?


Over the years, many researchers and scientists have scoured government documents at the National Archives in search of proof that life exists beyond Earth.

The National Archives and Records Administration is actually home to several collections of documents pertaining to unidentified flying objects (UFOs) or “flying disks.” And over the decades, those resources have been thoroughly probed and scrutinized for even a hint of more information and proof of alien existence.

One set of documents, known as Project Blue Book, includes retired, declassified records from the United States Air Force (USAF), currently in the custody of the National Archives. It relates to the USAF investigations of UFOs from 1947 to 1969.

Also read: The Navy keeps encountering mysterious UFOs

According to a US Air Force Fact Sheet, a total of 12,618 sightings were reported to Project Blue Book during this time period. Of those, 701 remained “unidentified.” The project — once headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio — officially ended in 1969.

The subject of UFOs has long fascinated National Archives staff members as well. In a July 15, 2017, National Archives The Text Message blog post, “See Something, Say Something”: UFO Reporting Requirements, Office of Military Government for Bavaria, Germany, May 1948 archivists Greg Bradsher and Sylvia Naylor share a brief history of Project Blue Book, the project’s alternative names over the course of its existence, and some information on the infamous Roswell, New Mexico, UFO incident.

 

 

All of Project Blue Book documentation is available on 94 rolls of microfilm (T1206) with the case files and the administrative records. These records are available for examination in the National Archives Microfilm Reading Room at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. Motion picture film, sound recordings, and some still pictures are maintained by the Motion Picture Sound Video Branch and the Still Picture Branch. There is even a Project Blue Book webpage so researchers can access online more than 50,000 official U.S. Government documents relating to the UFO phenomenon.

Richard Peuser, chief of textual reference operations at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland, said the agency has seen a steady amount of interest in files dealing with UFOs, responding to “a few hundred or so requests” over the years.

Related: This is what happened when a P-51 Mustang chased a UFO over Kentucky in 1948

“Sometimes the same person would write multiple times hoping for a different answer,” Peuser continued. “Many felt that the records were too benign and that the Government [must be] ‘hiding’ the real stuff. Often there were allegations of coverup, of deliberately hiding or destroying the documents.”

Peuser said, “The National Archives still gets a fair amount of inquiries relating to UFO’s and folks have come in looking for other records in accessioned US Air Force records in particular. So, Roswell, Area 51, Majestic-12, Projects Mogul, Sign, Grudge, and Twinkle continue to fascinate and draw researchers to examine our holdings for aliens.”

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The National Archives catalog yielded 37 catalog descriptions, organized under flying saucers, saucers, flying UFO phenomena, UFOlogy, or UFOs.

Over the years, as records have been processed and cataloged at the National Archives, other documents have come to light.

Just a few years ago, as archives technician Michael Rhodes was processing hundreds of boxes of Air Force records, he came across a drawing in the corner of a test flight report document that caught his eye.

The drawing — Rhodes said in the July 8, 2013 National Archives Pieces of History blog post, Flying Saucers, Popular Mechanics, and the National Archives — caught his attention because of its striking resemblance to the flying saucers in popular science fiction films made during that era. Researchers can look through the entire series in person or read the Project 1794 Final Development Summary Report of 1956 online.

More: Watch this crazy video of a Navy F-18 intercepting a UFO

The National Archives online catalog includes a series of records from the Federal Aviation Administration that document the sighting of a UFO by the crew of Japan Airlines Flight 1628 while in Alaskan airspace. National Archives records include simulated radar imagery and an article that appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine on May 24, 1987, about the incident.

Records in this collection also include notes from interviews with the three crew members who spotted the UFO and are available in the online catalog. The records were discovered as part of the Alaskan digitization project, according to Marie Brindo-Vas, a metadata technician at the National Archives in Seattle, Washington.

Another interesting record from National Aeronautics and Space Administration files includes the Air-to-Ground transcripts from Gemini VII. Found in the National Archives online catalog, the records include the transcript of a conversation between Houston control and astronauts who “have a bogey at 10 o’clock high.” Bogey was often the term used to refer to UFOs. The conversation goes on to explain that the astronauts are seeing in a polar orbit “hundreds of little particles going by from the left out about 3 or 4 miles.”

 

 

The National Archives also has audiovisual records pertaining to UFOs such as the video of Maj. Gen. John A. Samford’s Statement on “Flying Saucers” from the Pentagon, Washington, DC, on July 31, 1952, in which the military leader discusses the Army’s investigation of flying disks. Another video issued by the Department of Defense highlights USAF Lt. Col. Lawrence J. Tacker and Maj. Hector Quintanilla, Jr., discussing Project Blue Book and the identification of UFOs.

The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum possesses a document relating to UFOs composed by Ford when he was House Minority Leader and Congressman from Michigan. The original document is located in Box D9, folder “Ford Press Releases – UFO, 1966” of the Ford Congressional Papers: Press Secretary and Speech File at the Ford Library.

Read more: Boeing’s SR-71 Blackbird replacement totally looks like a UFO

In this memorandum, then-Congressman Ford proposed that “Congress investigate the rash of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects in Southern Michigan and other parts of the country.” An attached news release to that memorandum goes on to say “Ford is not satisfied with the Air Force explanation of the recent sightings in Michigan and describes the “swamp gas” version given by astrophysicist J. Allen Hynek as flippant.”

In October 1969, the then-Governor of Georgia, Jimmy Carter, saw a UFO over the skies of Leary, Georgia. The Jimmy Carter Presidential Museum and Library in Atlanta, Georgia, has the full report that he submitted into the International UFO Bureau.

As more documents are searched, processed, and declassified, what evidence might be found of alien and UFO existence at the National Archives? That remains to be seen, but based on past history, it’s clear that researchers and UFO enthusiasts will continue to dig for more information. The widespread fascination with the possibility of the existence of alien life forms and UFOs continues to arouse great passion and controversy all over Earth.

MIGHTY TRENDING

The 13 Funniest Military Memes Of The Week

Friday: When your boss is so busy on Facebook that you can surf WATM  without keeping your cursor over the minimize button. While you’re here, check out these 13 military memes.


Seriously, Air Force Dining Facilities, or DFACs, are like the promised land.

 

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Word is, Air Force cooks know twice as many ways to prepare chicken. That’s six! SIX!

They said see the world, not see the interesting parts.

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At least they’re not stationed on a sub, those sailors can’t even see the water.

Water conservation is the only conservation the military practices.

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Using two wipes is the equivalent of a bubble bath with candles and lavender.

They’re highly trained, HOOAH!?

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A doctor who can only prescribe ibuprofen and water.

 

“This is PT? Why is no one yelling at you?” A military truth.

 

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The Soldiers may make jokes, but you know they’re jealous of those fabulous PT uniforms.

It’s my combat laptop.

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Pilots: like pets but more expensive.

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Otherwise they’ll get out, and you’ll never catch them.

Skip one day of PT, and you’re shamming …

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… skip all the days of PT, and you’re an embarrassment to your branch.

It only takes one.

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He was behind the wheel. Now, he’s in front of first sergeant, swearing that the ravine came out of nowhere.

Seriously, they’re using zero of the fundamentals of marksmanship.

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That bandage on her finger probably garners a Purple Heart, Combat Action Medal, and promotion.

After Red Rover resulted in too many visits to the medic …

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It’s not as easy as it looks. Those PT belts are heavy.

Airmen are the most devoted …

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… civilian supporters of the military.

There’s more than one way to be a blue falcon.

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Seriously, we’re within smelling distance of you at all times. WE KNOW.

NOW: 17 Photos That Show Why Troops Absolutely Love The .50 Caliber Machine Gun

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