US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY TACTICAL

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

US soldiers are patrolling Afghanistan with a new tool that lets them see the battlefield like never before — personal, pocket-sized drones.

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division has deployed to Afghanistan with Black Hornet personal reconnaissance drones — a small, lightweight unmanned aerial vehicle produced by FLIR Systems that can be quickly and easily deployed to provide improved situational awareness on the battlefield.


US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

A 3rd BCT paratrooper prepares to launch a Black Hornet in Kandahar, Aug. 9, 2019.

(US Army photo by Maj. Thomas Cieslak)

Soldiers are taking these nano drones on patrol in combat zones.

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team deployed to Kandahar province in Afghanistan in July from Fort Bragg in North Carolina to replace the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Stars and Stripes reports.

Army paratroopers have been “routinely” using the Black Hornets, recon drones that look like tiny helicopters, for foot patrols, the Army said in a statement.

“The Black Hornet provided overhead surveillance for the patrol as it gauged security in the region and spoke to local Afghans about their concern,” a caption accompanying a handful of photos from a recent patrol in Kandahar explained.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

A 3rd BCT paratrooper with a Black Hornet drone.

(US Army photo by Maj. Thomas Cieslak)

These UAVs offer “immediate situational awareness of the battlefield,” the Army said previously.

The Army awarded FLIR a multimillion-dollar contract earlier this year to provide Black Hornet drones to US troops.

A little over 6 inches in length and weighing only 1.16 ounces, these drones are “small enough for a dismounted soldier to carry on a utility belt,” according to FLIR Systems.

These UAVs offer beyond-visual-line-of-sight capability during day or night out to distances of up to 1.24 miles and have a maximum speed of about 20 feet a second.

These drones, which are able to transmit high-quality images and video, can also be launched in a matter of seconds and can quietly provide covert coverage of the battlefield for around half an hour, Business Insider saw firsthand at an exclusive FLIR technology demonstration.

The Black Hornets “will give our soldiers operating at the squad level immediate situational awareness of the battlefield through its ability to gather intelligence, provide surveillance, and conduct reconnaissance,” Lt. Col. Isaac Taylor, an Army public affairs officer, previously told Business Insider.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Paratroopers on patrol in Kandahar province in Afghanistan.

(US Army photo by Maj. Thomas Cieslak)

These drones have the potential to be a real “life-saver” for US troops.

Soldiers in the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division were the first troops to get their hands on the new Black Hornet drones, part of the Soldier Borne Sensor (SBS) program.

Back in the spring, soldiers trained for a week at Fort Bragg with the new drones, getting a feel for the possibilities provided by this technology.

“This kind of technology will be a life-saver for us because it takes us out of harm’s way while enhancing our ability to execute whatever combat mission we’re on,” Sgt. Ryan Subers, one of the operators, said in a statement.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of March 27

No matter where you look, there’s only one thing in the news – COVID-19. And as a comedic military writer, I feel a certain sense of duty to help others by trying to put a smile on the faces of our community in these trying times.

Even as we speak, all five thousand plus service members onboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt are to be tested for the Coronavirus as a precaution and won’t allow any sailors to leave while it’s docked in Guam. You read that right, folks. No one is going anywhere until the Navy gets its 5,000 seaman samples.


Stay safe out there, you dirty animals. Anyway, here’s some memes.

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Fkw3QutpgsaiBCDFvVc686Ir1emgFkOulmSd0TL9n67V28ZJq4shiWUUvvZ2NuBXjHHsDbPH3LoNT3UgoFA7cJalTiDSkqcIXn_gRMmaflXVUV62vTwwsL8vmxxKY6vVr2ws2m4P3WCn4EQkw5A&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=726&h=244ee819714e56b813f50d392e9bc9db7b72dea1757537625481f4af83175864&size=980x&c=748705079 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Fkw3QutpgsaiBCDFvVc686Ir1emgFkOulmSd0TL9n67V28ZJq4shiWUUvvZ2NuBXjHHsDbPH3LoNT3UgoFA7cJalTiDSkqcIXn_gRMmaflXVUV62vTwwsL8vmxxKY6vVr2ws2m4P3WCn4EQkw5A%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D726%26h%3D244ee819714e56b813f50d392e9bc9db7b72dea1757537625481f4af83175864%26size%3D980x%26c%3D748705079%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via The Salty Soldier)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FcnTLzrsz7d2QRzu8-oMz-5HDUHpqfTGN0KBA7rQJxyl0ujOx5NVWpERz750rhML0v_Irf0N8GofBZ0Bb-sA6M190XYlsxmOAgtQKvLh6&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=474&h=07e29999117bb1e0fabf11ddfd6c89ae3e4b20b589340b83d1d83956b886a7b9&size=980x&c=2107624224 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FcnTLzrsz7d2QRzu8-oMz-5HDUHpqfTGN0KBA7rQJxyl0ujOx5NVWpERz750rhML0v_Irf0N8GofBZ0Bb-sA6M190XYlsxmOAgtQKvLh6%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D474%26h%3D07e29999117bb1e0fabf11ddfd6c89ae3e4b20b589340b83d1d83956b886a7b9%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2107624224%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Disgruntled Vets)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F_ZRC4pmYJ_5ydQpKqvF1gAVCBXzfgk4oJIhRQALgPY2UVzRoLRoW4gPJcPy2aLkjDLbp55NedPa2eeIWvkF92OMWBL3qUo1F0ZuApX4TlRK4fSVniy3wg9M0LbvdJcHKnv8fiXlCsyvv5R54PQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=57&h=a021350c847fba78117f365f8c9d3d9ef284cabccc3e41ab15922a41aa3f9bd1&size=980x&c=2833180680 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F_ZRC4pmYJ_5ydQpKqvF1gAVCBXzfgk4oJIhRQALgPY2UVzRoLRoW4gPJcPy2aLkjDLbp55NedPa2eeIWvkF92OMWBL3qUo1F0ZuApX4TlRK4fSVniy3wg9M0LbvdJcHKnv8fiXlCsyvv5R54PQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D57%26h%3Da021350c847fba78117f365f8c9d3d9ef284cabccc3e41ab15922a41aa3f9bd1%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2833180680%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via US Army WTF Moments)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FnmGjLkI01UoN5DF2QZmsS6QtYpbfuiE06fe_Ejh-NioWf0l2CzKDqr0qePPGV-v8N1uD3izimQj1RCamDuy0YCJIdOmJMxJ5GGDGKKpHx9edU9KmNU5fiQ75Zvvzs0RcKvFT_P-YqFgdyxkBaQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=681&h=0f9417de5af9cfc1aa65a514b162b440f5519f85c3090938cf452731248007c5&size=980x&c=38713566 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FnmGjLkI01UoN5DF2QZmsS6QtYpbfuiE06fe_Ejh-NioWf0l2CzKDqr0qePPGV-v8N1uD3izimQj1RCamDuy0YCJIdOmJMxJ5GGDGKKpHx9edU9KmNU5fiQ75Zvvzs0RcKvFT_P-YqFgdyxkBaQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D681%26h%3D0f9417de5af9cfc1aa65a514b162b440f5519f85c3090938cf452731248007c5%26size%3D980x%26c%3D38713566%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Call for Fire)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FA5A9ovP6q9_mhsNhWQWV7M4B78Lu6_mKk3-MFBYJuUs9affT3pG-_BjiajdGu73eY-hmH0O20PeJ92PpxmHP8Ar69vTd3xoF4CXYJtiw&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=710&h=658618f048c27ed1a98cd50fdf92eb7fcc79725121929889b01ab4e187ac9004&size=980x&c=1775226212 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FA5A9ovP6q9_mhsNhWQWV7M4B78Lu6_mKk3-MFBYJuUs9affT3pG-_BjiajdGu73eY-hmH0O20PeJ92PpxmHP8Ar69vTd3xoF4CXYJtiw%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D710%26h%3D658618f048c27ed1a98cd50fdf92eb7fcc79725121929889b01ab4e187ac9004%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1775226212%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Infantry Follow Me)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2F6LFHFfG_ZYUqM4-Lbkdol_CsiLRZbCPbVRWh-C_9BbrM1bLkfcUbJ9aMCwulgKItSo1a4ocnpB7rgWGarZZhanWcSV32wiEin0DVt72C&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=471&h=496db1eb993011b7d4867565992ef1953013b8d238c3424f89da9b999ef62987&size=980x&c=3979691725 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252F6LFHFfG_ZYUqM4-Lbkdol_CsiLRZbCPbVRWh-C_9BbrM1bLkfcUbJ9aMCwulgKItSo1a4ocnpB7rgWGarZZhanWcSV32wiEin0DVt72C%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D471%26h%3D496db1eb993011b7d4867565992ef1953013b8d238c3424f89da9b999ef62987%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3979691725%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via The Army’s Fckups)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FUPIxbtdVfL3f3XxujiAymEBpfxbMjhkGMeP0hXbC5gjlwlmsBIkTWd8iu4LP6N1NlFcp51ULXkCI8onngZY8lIhXqP6ZlGzAGrD9JCebgzKwSHeN9U-yMdOAVyBQf0g2HqsYzZ3QK7Ae9XMoEA&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=809&h=133dbde2c3ae73e5930b07709916827beb8cdf12b2ad7ee4a1f89ebfc9a62b70&size=980x&c=4023709039 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FUPIxbtdVfL3f3XxujiAymEBpfxbMjhkGMeP0hXbC5gjlwlmsBIkTWd8iu4LP6N1NlFcp51ULXkCI8onngZY8lIhXqP6ZlGzAGrD9JCebgzKwSHeN9U-yMdOAVyBQf0g2HqsYzZ3QK7Ae9XMoEA%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D809%26h%3D133dbde2c3ae73e5930b07709916827beb8cdf12b2ad7ee4a1f89ebfc9a62b70%26size%3D980x%26c%3D4023709039%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Valhalla Wear)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Fw8guRgJm2s2zTRzCZi9DsBrOh-ir4Y29_Ge7LWVrOe_Bjigz34xrn2DHhCLq4NfH4nV4AC4SlGY091sZWAVMkbDqdjzzsxGoAtFm8eeP7wqtXkTLow4IZ2KWW2vEdO9fZYA_BrdEYbF91psK2g&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=730&h=27ecbc6791d76fac02c0f0efb8a71b6bffbf6e38c8680715410f8cb1ba68b60f&size=980x&c=2447655748 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Fw8guRgJm2s2zTRzCZi9DsBrOh-ir4Y29_Ge7LWVrOe_Bjigz34xrn2DHhCLq4NfH4nV4AC4SlGY091sZWAVMkbDqdjzzsxGoAtFm8eeP7wqtXkTLow4IZ2KWW2vEdO9fZYA_BrdEYbF91psK2g%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D730%26h%3D27ecbc6791d76fac02c0f0efb8a71b6bffbf6e38c8680715410f8cb1ba68b60f%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2447655748%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via ASMDSS)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FYLMps3Bvka3pUz-aP6f_bsGKRrMJjmJNL4zI5ABK73ireqZ0p4H8QV61Y_7AQVyqQbeZrUDmz9rI-H01n0f98SEVo4F03XSEgDUVTd-CbaUl5WQ3UDML3J3x757EuW3166sth2AmbkVLndck7Q&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com&s=379&h=7a15ac5b490a46e325f318971178da01bb68b89b739f2802e0444bc8701bc05c&size=980x&c=1787017625 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FYLMps3Bvka3pUz-aP6f_bsGKRrMJjmJNL4zI5ABK73ireqZ0p4H8QV61Y_7AQVyqQbeZrUDmz9rI-H01n0f98SEVo4F03XSEgDUVTd-CbaUl5WQ3UDML3J3x757EuW3166sth2AmbkVLndck7Q%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh5.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D379%26h%3D7a15ac5b490a46e325f318971178da01bb68b89b739f2802e0444bc8701bc05c%26size%3D980x%26c%3D1787017625%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Do You Even Comm, Bro?)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FNMvmdjzBU3Hso2l2EQ8NFdgqHNHJCfufqXJlzQ0ipnMp6Ii5WH97uPhLgFfKx4WBnvtKh-m-BTS8H15A_QTmbbOFSsq6uMMwXveQyQJdD3055Fw9YSwaxcnxVRMWWOQfyENUncM5tTMaTpKtwA&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=872&h=fbffd55f704cf40008474f74d4fca0d7334b957e7af3908cff192447de3d72f6&size=980x&c=167450354 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FNMvmdjzBU3Hso2l2EQ8NFdgqHNHJCfufqXJlzQ0ipnMp6Ii5WH97uPhLgFfKx4WBnvtKh-m-BTS8H15A_QTmbbOFSsq6uMMwXveQyQJdD3055Fw9YSwaxcnxVRMWWOQfyENUncM5tTMaTpKtwA%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D872%26h%3Dfbffd55f704cf40008474f74d4fca0d7334b957e7af3908cff192447de3d72f6%26size%3D980x%26c%3D167450354%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Decelerate Your Life)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FfTjpGXBD020qaBMaZjL7ny_q6uwPoXChKb6J3M9mbmeD9gugbjf_fIDuRjDetxpTWU9huRmOsweo7-gBHS2xe6ULKN-1Bh7SyuapuHS-wB9_LFvNc-_r87rV0nDlWCzeu7QkPHlXrJdaYXyjtQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh4.googleusercontent.com&s=830&h=3f250890ba8d57c54083a8007e935120933e4e1abd15a710e1445749955bfb35&size=980x&c=914388412 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FfTjpGXBD020qaBMaZjL7ny_q6uwPoXChKb6J3M9mbmeD9gugbjf_fIDuRjDetxpTWU9huRmOsweo7-gBHS2xe6ULKN-1Bh7SyuapuHS-wB9_LFvNc-_r87rV0nDlWCzeu7QkPHlXrJdaYXyjtQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh4.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D830%26h%3D3f250890ba8d57c54083a8007e935120933e4e1abd15a710e1445749955bfb35%26size%3D980x%26c%3D914388412%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Army as F*ck)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2Fr1E7ePBAPQff7mGc_Pv1eBm1haLKgaeFkN-velmmim6HhSoiJY0tUZC99-r_nLIuiimD2FB6q7LkjLDtJPr761XTptCoYIrd33TOqC_tzp9SQ2ULOgqX0ak92ddvp_8iK70_hjOaJQIiY6kJJg&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com&s=536&h=01de4a67ab22fa2d96366b0cdc5f815593150e4890e795b97a3ce4c5f1b84314&size=980x&c=3839417368 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252Fr1E7ePBAPQff7mGc_Pv1eBm1haLKgaeFkN-velmmim6HhSoiJY0tUZC99-r_nLIuiimD2FB6q7LkjLDtJPr761XTptCoYIrd33TOqC_tzp9SQ2ULOgqX0ak92ddvp_8iK70_hjOaJQIiY6kJJg%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh6.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D536%26h%3D01de4a67ab22fa2d96366b0cdc5f815593150e4890e795b97a3ce4c5f1b84314%26size%3D980x%26c%3D3839417368%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Air Force amn/nco/snco)

[rebelmouse-proxy-image https://media.rbl.ms/image?u=%2FytTUO4VuWCf6RsHk-w3ZHzGPyl4BS2GK51H4_AzJVKHlBVqmiVj7ODwCFV2b7MLK6f6xkM9uy6lFvXNu7ChHwHll11713KpYU7MdGFJLj7x0_yWNDbXacYOGAACetdsNwxsI5nTBhfqokFKZNQ&ho=https%3A%2F%2Flh3.googleusercontent.com&s=381&h=bbcebcc26d8d3efbdc55c9b3e7a13e18093dd1c47c6df738c123bbc651dbceba&size=980x&c=2206794480 crop_info=”%7B%22image%22%3A%20%22https%3A//media.rbl.ms/image%3Fu%3D%252FytTUO4VuWCf6RsHk-w3ZHzGPyl4BS2GK51H4_AzJVKHlBVqmiVj7ODwCFV2b7MLK6f6xkM9uy6lFvXNu7ChHwHll11713KpYU7MdGFJLj7x0_yWNDbXacYOGAACetdsNwxsI5nTBhfqokFKZNQ%26ho%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Flh3.googleusercontent.com%26s%3D381%26h%3Dbbcebcc26d8d3efbdc55c9b3e7a13e18093dd1c47c6df738c123bbc651dbceba%26size%3D980x%26c%3D2206794480%22%7D” expand=1]

(Meme via Pop Smoke)

Articles

How to handle sleep deprivation, according to a Navy SEAL

Everybody always says the same thing when you announce you’re expecting: “Better catch up on your rest!” Or, “Sleep in while you still can!” Or even worse, “I’m your carefree single friend who stays out until two AM and then goes to brunch!” All of them also think they’re sharing a secret, as if they’re frontline soldiers watching new recruits get rotated to the front. These people are incredibly annoying. Or maybe they’re not. Who knows, you’re in a groggy, sleep-deprived haze.


Related: What you need to know about the Navy SEAL Trump picked for his cabinet

How you deal with sleep deprivation defines your first years as a parent. If there’s anyone who knows a thing or two about propping up sagging eyelids, it’s John McGuire. A Former Navy SEAL, he not only survived Hell Week — that notorious 5-day suffer-fest in where aspiring SEALs are permitted a total of only four hours of sleep — but also the years of sleep deprivation that come with being a father of five. McGuire, who’s also an in-demand motivational speaker and founder of the SEAL Team Physical Training program, offered some battle-tested strategies on how to make it through the ultimate Hell Week. Or as you call it, “having a newborn.”

Get Your Head Right

It doesn’t matter if it’s a live SEAL team operation or an average day with a baby, the most powerful tactic is keeping your wits about you. “You can’t lose your focus or discipline,” McGuire says. In other words, the first step is to simply believe you have what it takes best the challenge ahead. “Self-doubt destroys more dreams than failure ever has.” This applies to CEOs, heads of households, and operatives who don’t exist undertaking missions that never happened taking out targets whose the Pentagon will not confirm.

 

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
U.S. Navy photo

Teamwork Makes The Lack Of Sleep Work

“In the field, lack of communication can get someone killed,” says McGuire. And while you might not be facing the same stress during a midnight diaper blowout as you would canvassing for an IED, the same rules apply: remain calm and work as a team. Tempers will flare, but the last thing that you want, per McGuire, is for negativity to seep through.

One way to prevent this? Remind yourself: I didn’t get a lot of sleep but I love my family, so I’m going to really watch what I say. At least that’s what McGuire says. And when communicating, be mindful of your current sleep-deprived state: “If you are, you’ll be more likely say something along the lines of, ‘Hey, I’m not feeling myself because I didn’t get enough sleep,'” he says.

Put The Oxygen Mask On Yourself First

The more you can schedule your life – and, in particular, exercise – the better, says McGuire. And this is certainly a tactic that’s important with a newborn in the house. “It’s like on an airplane: You need to place the oxygen mask on yourself first before you can put one on your kid.” Exercise reduces stress, helps you sleep better, and get the endorphins pumping. “You can hold your baby and do squats if you want,” he says. “It’s not as much about the squats as making sure you exercise and clear the mind.” Did your hear that, maggot!?

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
U.S. Navy SEAL candidates from class 284 participate in Hell Week at the Naval Special Warfare Center at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego, California. U.S. Navy photo

Don’t Try To Be A No-Sleep Hero

McGuire has heard people say that taking naps longer than 20 minutes will make you more tired than before you nap. Tell that to a SEAL (or a new dad). McGuire has seen guys sleep on wood pallets on an airplane flying through lightning and turbulence. He once saw a guy fall asleep standing up. The point is, sleep when you can, wherever you can, for as long you can. “Sleep is like water: you need it when you need it.”

Know Your Limits

Lack of proper sleep effects leads to more than under-eye bags: your patience plummets, you’re more likely to gorge on unhealthy foods, and, well, you’re kind of a dummy. So pay attention to what you shouldn’t do as much as what you should. “A good leader makes decisions to improve things, not make them worse,” says McGuire. “If you’re in bad shape, you could fall asleep at the wheel, you can harm your child. You’ve got to take care of yourself.”

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Students in Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL class 279 participate in a surf passage exercise during the first phase of training at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado. Surf passage is one of many physically strenuous exercises that BUD/S class 279 will take part in during the seven weeks of first phase. The Navy SEALs are the maritime component of U.S. Special Forces and are trained to conduct a variety of operations from the sea, air and land. U.S. Navy photo by Kyle Gahlau

 

Embrace The Insanity

It would be cute if this next sentiment came from training, but it’s probably more a function of McGuire the Dad than McGuire the SEAL: Embrace the challenge because it won’t last long. Even McGuire’s brood of five, which at some point may have seemed they may never grow up, have. “You learn a lot about people and yourself through your children,” he says. “Have lots of adventures. Take lots of pictures and give lots of hugs,” he says. It won’t last forever — and you’ll have plenty of time to sleep when it’s over.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY TACTICAL

The Navy is putting ‘the proper equipment’ back on its ships to operate in harsh Arctic conditions

The Navy continues to adapt to harsh Arctic conditions, Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis, head of the Navy’s 2nd Fleet, said Tuesday.

After decades focused on other regions, the Navy has been increasing its presence in the Arctic as it grows more accessible to economic activity and, in turn, to broader strategic competition with rivals like Russia and China.


The latest venture north began Tuesday, when Navy and Coast Guard ships joined Canadian, Danish, and French vessels for the annual Canadian-led exercise Operation Nanook in the waters between Canada and Greenland.

The exercise consists of “basic tactical operating in the higher latitudes,” elements of which are “significantly different than how we operate” elsewhere, Lewis said.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

An MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter takes off from Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Thomas Hudner, August 2, 2020. (US Navy/MCS Seaman Apprentice Sawyer Connally)

“If you fall in the water where they’re going to be operating, you’re not going to survive very long unless you have the proper equipment on board, which is something that we have taken off our ships in recent years, and now we’ve put it back in,” Lewis said.

Other lessons are being relearned, Lewis said, citing the USS Harry S. Truman, which sailed into the Arctic in 2018 — the first such trip by a carrier in decades — with “a bunch of baseball bats to knock ice off the superstructure.”

“You have to have the flexibility and the timing built into your scheme of maneuver … because the weather has a huge impact on your ability to make it through straits or going through a certain chokepoint,” Lewis said.

US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Thomas Hudner will also do rigid-hull inflatable boat operations as part of the exercise. “It is the first time that we’re putting a boat in the water recently in these temperature climates,” Lewis said.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

US Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Thomas Hudner the Atlantic Ocean, August 2, 2020. (US Navy/MCS MC2 Sara Eshleman)

“It’s by nature a fairly challenging environment anyway,” Lewis added. “But then you throw the temperature and the potential sea state being higher — that’s something we need to kind of take a crawl-walk-run approach to.”

Nanook will have gunnery and other drills, such as tracking vessels of interest. “A lot of it has to do with basic warfare serials … and then basic security tasks and operating together,” Rear Adm. Brian Santarpia said Tuesday.

Santarpia, who commands Canadian naval forces in the Atlantic and Arctic, said it was “great” to get sailors into unfamiliar surroundings.

“Once we put them up there, they’re going to solve all the problems on their own,” Santarpia said. “They just have to recognize that there is a challenge and then they tend to get after it.”

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

US Coast Guard cutter Willow transits near an iceberg with a Danish naval vessel in the Nares Strait, August 23, 2011. (US Coast Guard/PO3 Luke Clayton)

‘We’re going to learn a lot’

The Canadian military has conducted Operation Nanook since 2007, working with local and foreign partners to practice disaster response and maritime security across northern Canada. There will be no operations ashore this year because of COVID-19.

The Canadian ships left Halifax on Tuesday with US Coast Guard medium-endurance cutter Tahoma. They will meet USS Thomas Hudner and sail north to meet French and Danish ships and operate around the Davis Strait, off Greenland’s west coast.

“This will be the farthest north that we have deployed this class of cutter, so we’re excited to showcase the agility of our fleet,” Vice Adm. Steven Poulin, the Coast Guard’s Atlantic Area commander, said Tuesday.

Lewis and Poulin both said Nanook is a chance to practice adapting to challenges in the Arctic, such as communications interference.

“That’s one of the reasons we wanted to push this medium endurance cutter so far north. We’re going to learn a lot about our own operations” and about “the logistics chain that’s required to support our Coast Guard assets that are so far north,” Poulin said.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Search and rescue technicians on a CH-149 Cormorant conduct a hoist-rescue exercise with Canadian coastal defense ship Shawinigan during Operation Nanook, August, 22, 2014. (Joint Task Force (North)/LS Mat1 Barrieau)

The Canadian military adjusted Nanook in 2018 to include “everything we did in the Arctic,” Santarpia said. “It demonstrates … to anybody who is interested in the Arctic that Canada knows … how to take care of its own security and sovereignty in that area.”

Santarpia said more activity in the Arctic, facilitated by a warming climate, underscores the need to be present there for strategic reasons as well as emergency response.

“Last year was the warmest year in the Arctic that they’ve ever had. This year’s on pace to be warmer yet. It allows us to operate [there] for a little bit longer,” Santarpia said, adding that Canada’s navy didn’t “have any [Arctic] ability until just Friday, when the very first Canadian Arctic offshore patrol ship was delivered.”

That ship, HMCS Harry DeWolf, arrived two years late, but five more are to be delivered to Canada’s navy and two to its coast guard in the coming years.

“Next year, it’ll be part of the of the exercise, and that vessel can operate actually in the first-year ice that’s a meter thick,” Santarpia said. But until then the Canadian navy “is limited to where the ice is not pack ice.”

As those waters become navigable for longer periods, “we will slowly be able to spend more time in the north,” Santarpia added. “As the new capability comes online … we’ll be up there for the majority of year eventually.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.


popular

Watch the F-22 take on 5 F-15s — and dominate

The F-22 Raptor is an expensive plane. While some critics pegged its cost at over $300 million a plane, the actual fly-away cost could go down to $116 million per Raptor, according to a 2006 Air Force release.


US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
An F-22 deploys flares. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The F-22 was slated to replace the F-15A/B/C/D Eagles as the premier air-superiority fighter. But the Raptor’s production was halted at 187 airframes. Let’s go through a tale of the tape on these planes, before we see what happens when five Eagles jump a Raptor.

According to Joe Baugher, the F-15 has a top speed of Mach 2.5, a cruising speed of 570 knots, can carry eight air-to-air missiles (usually four AIM-120/AIM-7 and four AIM-9), and has a 20mm M61 cannon with 940 rounds. It has a range of 3,450 miles.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Baugher notes that the F-22 has a top speed of Mach 2.2 slightly slower than the F-15. But the F-22 cruises at Mach 1.6. It carries four AIM-120 and four AIM-9 missiles. It also has a 20mm M61 cannon. It has a combat radius of up to 800 nautical miles.

Here’s the video showing how the five Eagles fared against the Raptor. Warning: This was not a fair fight.

Articles

This is the most powerful sidearm ever issued by the US military

In 1846, American firearms legend Samuel Colt teamed with Capt. Samuel Hamilton Walker to produce the most powerful sidearm ever issued to the U.S. military – the Colt Walker 1847.


Walker, a Texas Ranger (no joke) and officer in the militaries of both the Republic of Texas and the United States when Texas entered the Union, served in the American West’s many armed conflicts. He fought the Indian Wars and the Texian War of Independence as well as the Mexican-American War.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

After he was discharged from the Texas Rangers, Walker self-funded a trip to New York to meet Colt. The duo based their design on the five-round Colt Paterson revolver. Walker and Colt would add a sixth round to the chamber, along with a stationary trigger and guard. With that, they created the most powerful black powder handgun ever made.

With a 9-inch barrel and .44 caliber round, this weapon had an effective range of 100 yards and the muzzle energy of a .357 Magnum. At only 4.5 pounds, the Colt Walker 1847 was the most powerful U.S. military sidearm ever issued and the most powerful pistol until the introduction of the Magnum .357 in 1935. Walker himself carried two of his own pistols into Mexico during the war with the U.S. mounted rifles.

When one of his troops killed a Mexican soldier with the pistol at Veracruz, a medical officer reportedly remarked that the hand cannon shot hit with equal force and range as a .54-caliber Mississippi Rifle.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
(Warner Bros.)

There were some drawbacks to the design, including that sometimes the cylinders blew up in the shooter’s hand due to the amount of powder used — which was twice the amount used in similar weapons of the time. Colt recommended using 50 grains of powder, instead of the prescribed 60. Lard was sometimes used to keep all the cylinders from exploding at once.

Walker was killed leading troops through Huamantla, Mexico, during the Mexican-American War. Colt, who was bankrupt when he met Walker, rebuilt his business and reputation beginning with the Colt Walker 1847.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

The Colt Walker’s legacy lives on in the hearts of firearms enthusiasts and American historians. In 2008, an original model, with original powder flask, fetched $920,000 at auction. That model was sold by Montana’s John McBride, whose great-great uncle was a Mexican War veteran.

Watch below as two European enthusiasts load and shoot a reproduction of the Colt Walker 1847.

Articles

Future Marine mega-drone may carry same weapons as F-35

The Marine Corps is on the hunt for a mega-drone that can take off and land vertically and deploy aboard ship — all while carrying a serious amount of firepower.


The service is asking a lot as it develops its MUX platform, short for Marine air-ground task force unmanned expeditionary capabilities, with plans to reach initial operational capability by 2026.

Also read: The Marine Corps wants an ‘R2D2’ robot for every squad

The Corps’ deputy commandant for aviation, Lt. Gen. Jon “Dog” Davis, said Wednesday at the Unmanned Systems Defense conference in Arlington, Virginia, that this future platform — a Group 5, the largest class of military drone — will be equipped to fight from sea as well as land.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Bell Helicopter’s planned V-247 Vigilant unmanned, single-engine armed tiltrotor platform may be a candidate for the Marine Corps’ plan for a mega-drone. | Illustration courtesy Bell Helicopter, a unit of Textron

“I would say we’re very aggressive with what we want that Group 5 to be,” Davis said. “I want my airplane to go off a seabase and, frankly, I think the Group 5 [unmanned aircraft system] for the Marine Corps will have [AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile] on there, will have AIM-9X [Sidewinder missile], will have all the weapons that an F-35 will carry, maybe even the sensors the F-35 will carry.”

This future drone will not be a competitor with the Corps’ new F-35B Lightning II 5th-generation fighter but a collaborator, able to team with the aircraft on missions, he said.

“It’s about … making sure that the Marines have the very best protection wherever they go, whatever they do, and manned-unmanned teaming is not just with attack helicopters — it’s with jets, it’s with grunts,” Davis said.

In the Corps’ 2016 aviation plan, the MUX is described as filling an extremely broad range of missions, including electronic warfare; reconnaissance and surveillance; command, control, communications and computers [C4]; aircraft escort; persistent fires; early warning; and tactical distribution.

“It will be a multi-sensor, electronic warfare, C4 bridge, [anti-air warfare] and strike capability at ranges complementary to MV-22 and F-35, giving MAGTF commanders flexible, persistent, and lethal reach,” the document states. “It will provide scalable MAGTF support deploying as detachments or squadrons supporting commanders at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels.”

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Lockheed Martin’s F-35A aircraft displays its weapons load-out at Edwards Air Force Base in California. | Lockheed Martin photo by Matt Short

Call it a mega-drone, if you will.

Prominent candidates for such a role include the Bell-Textron V-247, an unmanned, single-engine armed tiltrotor platform designed to operate from the sea; the Lockheed Martin K-Max built by Kaman, an optionally manned cargo chopper used to transport gear in Afghanistan and now being developed to accommodate sensors; and the Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node, or Tern, an aircraft developed by DARPA and the Office of Naval Research that sits on its tail so it can launch and recover on a ship’s deck.

Davis said he wants the Marines’ Group 5 UAS to be able to fly at 30,000 feet, the typical cruising altitude for an airliner, and to carry weapons internally to maximize efficiency and time on station. Ultimately, he said, he wants an unmanned aircraft that can do everything a manned aircraft can.

“Do I think it will replace manned platforms? No, but I think we have to integrate, look for capabilities, cover down our gaps, our seams, that are out there,” he said. “Frankly, no matter how many airplanes I have, I don’t get 24/7 coverage with my manned platforms, especially from my seabase. If we do distributed operations, we’re going to need all the game we can bring.”

Davis said he wants to see a tech demonstration flight of the MUX by 2018 and early operational capability for the system by 2024.

That timeline puts development of the mega-drone slightly ahead of the joint Future Vertical Lift program, which will select a next generation of helicopters for services including the Army and Marine Corps.

MIGHTY HISTORY

7 worst military defeats in modern history

It’s easy, when you’re one of the world’s great powers, to think that most battles will go your way. And the ones that won’t? Well, you can only lose so badly when you’ve got better technology, larger formations, and/or God on your side. Unfortunately, that’s not true, and even great powers can get themselves curb stomped in surprising ways.

Here are seven military defeats where someone thought they could be the big dog in a fight only to find out they were facing a bear:


US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Painting depicting the final minutes, and Russian losses, at the Battle of Tsushima Strait where a Russian fleet was annihilated by a larger, better prepared Japanese fleet in 1905.

Battle of Tsushima

It’s sometimes hard to remember that Russia once fielded a top-tier navy that made enemies around the world quiver in their boots. That actually changed during the Battle of Tsushima, when Russia sent a massive fleet to defend their claims in and around Korea from a growing Japanese Navy. The Japanese Navy used their better ships, tactics, and telegraphy (think ship-to-ship Morse code) to demolish the Russians.

The two fleets closed with each other on May 27, 1905, and the Japanese ships were in better condition, allowing them to sail slightly faster. Even better for the Japanese, there was a heavy fog that their telegraph traffic could penetrate, but the Russians couldn’t communicate as well with their lights and flags.

Japan’s five battleships and 84 other ships and boats were able to twice “cross the T” of Russia’s 38 ships, pounding the Russians with broadsides while the Russians could only reply with forward guns. The Russians were forced to flee, sinking only three Japanese torpedo boats while losing 28 ships.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Ottoman soldiers man machine guns in 1916, similar to the troops that maintained the Siege of Kut.

(Library of Congress)

Siege of Kut

The Siege of Kut took place in 1915 in what is now Iraq. British-Indian forces, retreating from a defeat at the hands of the Ottoman Empire, decided to stop at Kut, a position easily defended, but difficult to resupply. Since we’re talking about a siege, you can probably guess how that went.

Approximately 11,000 British and Indian infantrymen reached the fortress on December 3, and the Ottomans arrived four days later with 11,000 troops of their own — and with more reinforcements on the way. The British sent away cavalry and other forces that could escape and then settled in for the siege. The Ottoman forces, under command of a German adviser, cut off river and land access to the city.

British forces outside the city attempted to relieve it three times, but all three attempts failed dismally. While the Ottomans suffered approximately 10,000 casualties, the British were eventually forced to surrender after suffering 30,000 casualties and the capture of an additional 10,000 troops, including six generals.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Australian troops man captured Italian tanks during the capture of the port city of Tobruk in 1941 after Italian forces spread themselves too thin.

(Australian War Memorial)

Italian Western Desert Campaign — World War II

The Italian invasion of Egypt in 1940 was a fine if uninspired victory for the Italian fascists. They moved forward about 12 miles per day for about a week in September, 1940. During the campaign, the Italians failed to keep their troops close enough together to properly support one another, and the British took advantage of that fact the following December in Operation Compass.

The British planned a five-day raid in response. The goal was simply to push the Italians back a little, but the British made a note before the first attacks stating that they should be prepared to keep pushing, just in case — and this came in handy. The British forces quickly made much more progress than expected.

The Italians were occupying a series of fortified camps and, one after another, they fell to a force of 36,000 British soldiers. The British attacked from December 9 to February 9, 1941, and lost less than 600 troops killed and missing while inflicting over 5,000 kills and capturing over 125,000 Italian soldiers, 420 tanks, 564 aircraft, and multiple cities, including the key port of Tobruk.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

​Colorized photo of French artillerymen during the defense of France in 1940 as the German blitzkrieg thunders towards Paris.

(Cassowary Colorizations)

Battle of France

As we head into this one, let’s take a quick break to say that WATM actually really respects the performance of the French military from conflicts like the 100 Years War to the American Revolution to World War I. But the Battle of France in World War II was, uh, not France’s finest moment.

The French military knew that an invasion by Germany was likely in 1940, and they tried to prepare through modernization efforts and training. But, they made two big assumptions that would turn out to be false: The Ardennes Forest’s challenging terrain would prevent an invasion through there, and Belgium would last for weeks or months, allowing France to re-deploy troops as necessary if the Germans invaded through there.

Instead, the Germans proved the many of their tanks could make it through the Ardennes Forest, and Belgium fell within days. France, despite having more modern equipment and slightly more troops, fell to Germany in only 46 days with 1.9 million troops taken prisoner, thousands of tanks and aircraft destroyed or captured, and most of their country under German control.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Oil tanks burn on Midway Atoll after a Japanese air attack at the outset of the Battle of Midway on June 4, 1942.

(U.S. Navy)

Battle of Midway

The Battle of Midway was supposed to be Pear Harbor: The Sequel. It was an ambush set only six months after the attacks at Pearl. The Japanese goal was to draw the American fleet into a battle the Americans would think they could win, then slam them with additional forces and wipe out much America’s remaining carrier and capital ship strength.

Instead, America captured Japanese communications traffic and set an ambush of their own. Japan was working on the assumption that America would only have two carriers and a fleet full of demoralized sailors. Instead, America intercepted the plans and showed up with an extra carrier and prepped over 120 aircraft on Midway itself to join the battle.

On June 4, 1942, the fleets clashed, and Japanese aircraft were outnumbered by a vengeful U.S. presence in the air. Japan would lose three carriers and almost 250 aircraft in the fight while sinking one U.S. carrier and downing approximately 150 U.S. aircraft. The battle tipped the balance of power in the Pacific in World War II.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Soviets celebrate holding the city of Stalingrad in February 1943 after the German assault failed.

Battle of Stalingrad

The German invasion of Soviet Union relied on a number of horrible assumptions, including the idea that Soviets, especially the Slavs, were racially inferior and part of an uncoordinated system that would crumble at the first real assault from German armor. Unfortunately for them, racism and hope aren’t viable strategies.

Instead, the Soviets forced Germany to fight for nearly every foot of Soviet territory they took, and Stalingrad was arguably the worst of all. For nearly six months, German forces slogged their way through the city, street by street, and some of the streets were impossible to take. At “Pavlov’s House,” an infantry platoon turned an apartment building into a fortress and wiped out German armored formations for weeks.

The Germans threw well over 1 million men against the city and lost over 800,000 of them killed, captured, and wounded. The Soviets actually lost more (over 1.1 million), but they bled the German formations dry of food, ammo, and in some cases, men, allowing the Soviet Union to take the offensive and begin pushing the enemy back towards Berlin.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

The Bridge at Arnhem stands after British paratroopers were pushed back by a German counterattack in 1944.

(Imperial War Museum)

Operation Market Garden

In 1944, the allies hoped they could end the war in Europe before Christmas — push into the German heartland, take out industry, and push into Berlin by December and give all the Allied citizens the world’s best Christmas present. The plan called for a two-force approach, airborne assaults to take key bridges and a ground campaign to envelope portions of the Ruhr River.

The assault on Sep. 17, 1944, didn’t go as planned. German forces had learned lessons from previous Allied offensives, like a little thing called D-Day, and they made sure to reinforce bridges where possible and blow them up when they couldn’t hold them.

In a series of nine key bridges, the capture of most of them was either delayed or prevented. So, the airborne forces remained isolated as the armored forces couldn’t punch through the German defenders without bridges. Over 15,000 troops were killed, captured, or wounded while inflicting somewhere around 10,000 casualties and failing to take the key terrain, guaranteeing that the war would continue into 1945.

MIGHTY TRENDING

America’s legendary gun maker will file for bankruptcy

Remington Outdoor Co., the oldest gunmaker in America, is reportedly planning to file for bankruptcy protection.


The company has reached a deal to give lenders ownership over the firearms maker, Bloomberg reported on Feb. 12. On Feb. 8, Reuters reported that Remington had reached out to banks and credit investment funds in an attempt to acquire the funding necessary to file for bankruptcy.

In recent years, Remington has faced serious backlash after accidents and violent incidents related to the company’s guns.

In 2014, Remington settled a class-action lawsuit, agreeing to replace the triggers on 7.5 million allegedly defective guns free of charge. While Remington maintains that the guns are safe, the lawsuits linked the guns “to hundreds of serious injuries and at least two-dozen deaths,” CNBC reports.

Also Read: US Army simulation will prep teachers for school shootings

The company also faced backlash after a Remington rifle was among the weapons in the arsenal used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012. Twenty-six people were killed in the shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.

Bloomberg reports that a final nail in Remington’s coffin may have been a counter-intuitive one: the election of President Donald Trump.

Trump’s candidacy was supported by the National Rifle Association, and his two eldest sons are hunting enthusiasts. However, firearms sales fell after Trump’s election.

“Hillary Clinton’s defeat meant customers became less worried about losing access to weapons,” Bloomberg reported. “Sales plummeted, and retailers stopped re-ordering as they found themselves stuffed with unsold inventory they’d built up in anticipation of a Clinton presidency.”

MIGHTY TRENDING

Oracle founder backs nemesis Amazon in supporting US military

In a wide-ranging interview with Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo, Oracle founder and executive chairman Larry Ellison had a few choice things to say about Google’s newfound disdain for the U.S. military.

“Well I think it’s actually kind of shocking. Here Jeff Bezos and I absolutely agree,” Ellison said, in a rare show of kind words for the competitor that Ellison spends most of his time these days trash-talking.


Bartiromo had asked Ellison about the fight going on in the cloud computing industry over a massive cloud contract from the Department of Defense. The DoD will award the whole contract, worth about billion, to just one company. By all accounts the winner is expected to be Amazon Web Services. Oracle is one a handful of cloud competitors fighting tooth and nail to grab a portion of the contract away from AWS.

In recent weeks, cloud competitor Google dropped its bid for the contract. Google cited a new policy not to use its technology for military purposes., a policy that came about after an employee uprising on the matter. Google also admitted it was dropping the bid because its cloud hadn’t yet achieved all the government certifications that the DoD was asking for.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

(Flickr photo by Nguyen Hung Vu)

Fox’s Bartiromo suggested that there’s some hypocrisy with Google’s policies: it doesn’t want to do work for the US DoD but Google is reportedly trying to return to the Chinese market with a search engine that the Chinese government can sensor.

Ellison agreed.

“I think U.S. tech companies who say we will not support the U.S. Military, we will not work on any technology that helps our military, but yet goes into China and facilitates the Chinese government surveilling their people is pretty shocking,” he said.

To be fair, numerous Google employees are also protesting the company’s plans to return to China, just as they protested the military work. So the situation is more about whether Google yields to employee protests about China rather than a double-standard in the company’s business ambitions. If Google’s management had its way, it would presumably be doing business with both the military and China.

Bezos has also spoken out against Google’s policies.”If big tech companies are going to turn their back on the Department of Defense, this country is going to be in trouble,” Bezos told Wired in October 2018.

Bezos doubled down by donating million to With Honor, a political action committee fund trying to get more veterans elected to Congress.

Ellison also told Bartiromo, “I think it’s very important that U.S. technology companies support our country, our government. We are a democracy. If we don’t like our leaders, we can throw them out. If you don’t like the leaders in China, you can … fill in the blank.”

He went on to say he views China as a big threat to the U.S. these days.

“I think our big competitor is China, and that if we let China’s economy pass us up — if we let China produce more engineers than we do, if we let China’s technology companies beat our technology companies, it won’t be long that our military is behind technologically also,” he warned.

Here’s a segment of the interview where he discusses China.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

7 must-read books about the Global War on Terror

Wars are as culturally defining for a nation as its pop culture and politics. Each generation of war veterans breeds a new generation of writers who are willing to expose their scars and bleed them onto the page. The act itself violates a warrior-culture taboo: breaking the quiet professionalism ethos.

The Global War on Terrorism began when the twin towers fell on Sept. 11, 2001, and it continues to this day. It has been operating in the background of American life for the past two decades. Over 2.77 million men and women have deployed in direct support of it, creating a new generation of veterans and war correspondents who have seen fit to share their experience and knowledge through literature. What follows are seven of the most defining books of the Global War on Terror.


US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Maximilian Uriarte is the creator of the popular comic “Terminal Lance” and the author/illustrator of the graphic novel “The White Donkey.”

1. “The White Donkey” by Maximilian Uriarte

A beautifully illustrated and written graphic novel by the creator of the “Terminal Lance” comic strip, “The White Donkey” follows the story of Lance Corporal Abraham “Abe” Belatzeko, who joins the U.S. Marine Corps in the later stages of the Iraq War. In search of something he can’t explain, he trudges through the mundanity and physical discomfort of being a boot infantryman. Abe yearns for the opportunity to prove himself as a man and find enlightenment through spilling the blood of the enemy. But then the irreversible horrors of combat show him that war ain’t as glamorous as it’s portrayed in the movies.

When Abe returns home, the demons that were spurred from his experiences and regrets on that deployment cause him to disassociate from his fellow Marines, friends, and family. Uriate’s attention to detail in his realistic imagery is striking. He captures the essence of mid-2000s military and civilian life: The flip phones. The protests. The general population’s misunderstanding of the Iraq war. Through the story of this single Marine, “The White Donkey” takes us back to a war that has almost been forgotten.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Sebastian Junger is an American journalist, author, and filmmaker. In addition to writing “War,” he is noted for his book “The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men Against the Sea,” which became a bestseller and for his documentary films “Restrepo” and “Korengal,” which won awards.

2. “War” by Sebastian Junger

What’s it like at the edge of the world? “War” follows the paratroopers from the U.S. Army’s 173rd Airborne Brigade as they establish a forward operating base in the Korengal Valley in Afghanistan. The valley is a route used by the Taliban to smuggle in fresh troops and supplies for their Jihad against the Americans. The area has been left alone in the past because it was too remote to conquer, too poor to intimidate, and too autonomous to buy off.

Private First Class Juan Restrepo is amongst the first casualties of the platoon on this deployment. His death leaves such a rift that they name their FOB after him. Aside from the occasional resupply helicopters and their sister platoon in the valley, the men are completely cut off from the rest of the world, deep in hostile territory. Facing the ever-present threat of being overrun by a determined and skillful enemy, they eagerly await their next firefight, as the boredom and repetition of war sets in.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Evan Wright is an American writer known for his extensive reporting on subcultures for Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. He is best known for his book on the Iraq War, “Generation Kill.”

3. “Generation Kill” by Evan Wright

In March 2003, on the dawn of the invasion of Iraq, Evan Wright (a reporter from Rolling Stone magazine) joined the Marines of 1st Reconnaissance Battalion. Taking a passenger seat in the lead Humvee full of colorful Marines, Wright followed them on a road trip to war. What makes this book so captivating is not the war itself, but rather how Wright was able to capture the personalities of the Marines he was with.

The dialogue between Sergeant Colbert and Corporal Person are masterful examples of how humor is amplified by and transcends the chaos of war. The mean-street-influenced philosophy of Sergeant Espera offers surprising insight into human nature and how the white overloads really control the people. Trombley’s cavalier eagerness to get his first kill is strangely relatable.

Wright also captures many of the shortcomings of the chain of command, from overly strict enforcement of the grooming standards to its recklessness in abandoning a supply truck carrying the colors that their battalion had taken into combat since Vietnam. In a vivid scene, the company commander, known as “Encino Man,” attempts to call in artillery fire that is danger close to his men, only to be stopped by his subordinates because it may get them killed. The internal strife and politics alongside the basic discomfort of life in a combat zone wears thin on the morale of the unit.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Sergeant First Class Nicholas Moore served in the United States Army for 14 years and went on 13 deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. His military awards include the Purple Heart, two Bronze Stars, and the Army Commendation Medal with “V” device.

4. “Run to the Sound of the Guns: The True Story of an American Ranger at War in Afghanistan and Iraq” by Nicholas Moore

The true, firsthand account of Sergeant First Class Nicholas Moore, who has spent more than a decade preparing for and going to war with the U.S. Army’s 75th Ranger Regiment. When 9/11 occurred, Moore was a young private going through Ranger School. He was not scared of going to war — he was afraid of missing out on the action. Everyone thought that the war in Afghanistan would end quickly, similar to the more recent conflicts in Grenada, Panama, and Somalia. Little did he know that he’d be taking part in some of the war’s most famous events, such as rescuing Jessica Lynch and Operation Red Wings, the latter involving the search for a U.S. Navy SEAL element that had been pinned down.

The foul-mouthed nature of Rangers is softened considerably in Moore’s account, which is due to the fact that Moore is a family man who wanted to set a positive example for his children. However, he has no qualms with friendly criticism of his fellow special operations units. In these pages, you’ll catch a glimpse of the intense operation tempo of the 75th Ranger Regiment. Moore’s personal and professional development from lower-enlisted to senior noncommissioned officer is in direct parallel to the changes the GWOT and Ranger Regiment underwent.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Fred Kaplan is an American author and journalist. His weekly “War Stories” column for Slate magazine covers international relations and U.S. foreign policy.

(Author photo by Carol Dronsfield)

5. “The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War” by Fred Kaplan

The post-Vietnam War American military had adopted a “never again” philosophy toward fighting an indigenous guerilla force. The hard lessons it acquired in Vietnam through bloodshed were tossed aside as it returned to the Cold War-era of mass manpower military in a superpower conflict like World War II. The collapse of the Soviet Union and the destruction of Saddam Hussein’s vast tank columns during the first Gulf War left the U.S. the only super left on the planet. When the invasion of Iraq in 2003 ousted Hussein from power, a power vacuum occurred as the civil service administration run by the Ba’ath Party also collapsed.

General David Petraus, commander of the 101st Airborne Division during the invasion, found that he was fighting off an insurgency in Mosul, which was unthinkable to the top military commanders at the Pentagon. Petraus’ academic studies and military career had prepared him for such a mission. While his fellow field commanders were doing what the military does best — destroying the bad guys and asking questions later — Petraus knew that was counterproductive in terms of winning over the hearts and minds of the Iraqi people. To defeat an insurgency, the U.S. military needed officers who were well-versed in politics, diplomacy, economics, and military strategy.

There was a loose network of officers in the military who sought to fundamentally change the way America conducted its war. They argued that the small wars the U.S. had been reluctant to engage in would be the wars of the 21st century, and that there was a need for a deep and comprehensive counterinsurgency plan in order to win them. The military would be its own worst enemy during this period because of the bureaucratic pushback that change and reform entails. It required a paradigm shift in the role of the military in these conflicts.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

Marty Skovlund Jr. is the senior editor of Coffee or Die Magazine. He is a journalist, author, and filmmaker, as well as a U.S. Army 1/75 Ranger veteran.

6. “Violence of Action” by Marty Skovlund Jr., Lt. Col. Charles Faint, and Leo Jenkins

The 75th Ranger Regiment really came into its own during the GWOT. Marty Skovlund Jr., a former batt boy himself, gives an ambitious and in-depth overview of the regiment’s transformation from 2001 to 2011. Skovlund captures details such as the evolution of the combat gear worn to the change in operating procedures and mission scope. “Violence of Action” adds a personal touch with essays written by Ranger veterans and a Gold Star mother.

What stands out is how different every individual Ranger’s experience is in their battalion, yet each seem to have an overwhelming eagerness to complete the mission. Many small stories that would otherwise be lost in time are captured in this collection. Readers will get a sense of Ranger humor and crassness as these elite warriors seek to make the best of otherwise heart-wrenching and painful situations.

Still, a strong sense of duty and pride radiates through the pages as each man recounts their experiences in the toughest infantry unit in the world. No other book on the 75th Ranger Regiment does as much for the average reader in terms of understanding this secretive and oft-misunderstood unit.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones

David Burnett is a U.S. Army veteran from Colorado. “Making a Night Stalker” is his first book.

7. “Making a Night Stalker” by David Burnett

In the special operations world, all the glory goes to the ground pounders — Rangers, SEALS, Special Forces, and the special missions units. Yet the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR), known as the Night Stalkers, is to aviation what Rangers are to infantry: an elite unit comprised of the best aviators in the Army.

Specialist David Burnett started his military career as a CH-47 Chinook mechanic, but found the assignment unfulfilling. While he did maintain the helicopters in his unit, he didn’t feel like he was personally doing anything to fight the war. That changed when he saw a group of crew chiefs preparing their helicopters for a mission. Impressed by their professionalism and that they didn’t miss out on the fun of riding on the birds, he applied for selection for the 160th SOAR while deployed in Afghanistan. A good omen appeared to him that day when he saw, for the first time in his life, a Night Stalker’s signature black Chinook on the airfield.

A five-week smoke fest known as Green Platoon is the selection process that each candidate must endure to test their mental fortitude and commitment. Burnette graduated, earned the maroon beret, and was assigned to Alpha Company, which is a Chinook Flight Company.

When he reported to the 160th, his new platoon sergeant handed him a stack of manuals and a list of schools, including Dunker School and SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape) School, that he had to complete before he would be allowed to fly. Getting used to the high operational tempo of his unit, Brunette learned that remaining a Night Stalker during the GWOT was harder than becoming one.

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.

Articles

Trump picks controversial general for National Security Advisor post

President-elect Donald Trump named three members of his national-security team Nov. 18, including his pick for Attorney General, CIA director and National Security Advisor.


US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Army Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn previously led the Defense Intelligence Agency. He retired after political backlash from his harsh criticism of the Obama administration’s war on terrorism. (Photo from Defense Department)

According to multiple media reports, retired Army Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn was selected to be Trump’s National Security Advisor, while Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions was chosen for the Attorney General slot.

Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo was asked to serve as director of the Central Intelligence Agency.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo was picked to head the Central Intelligence Agency. (Official congressional portrait)

Flynn, who had been a strong supporter of Trump on the campaign train and was a former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, served in a number of posts during his Army career. He took part in Operations Urgent Fury and Restore Democracy, then served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan prior to taking charge of the DIA.

Flynn’s service decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Bronze Star with three oak leaf clusters, the Meritorious Service medal with five oak leaf clusters, and the Army Commendation Medal with five oak leaf clusters.

Flynn’s tenure as DIA director was marked by controversy, leading him to retire in August 2014.

Representative Pompeo was first elected to Congress in 2010 and was re-elected to his fourth term in 2016. Prior to entering Congress, Pompeo served for five years in the United States Army, reaching the rank of captain, then went to Harvard Law School before founding an aerospace firm and becoming president of an oilfield equipment company.

Pompeo has been an advocate of a hard line with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Pompeo has served on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Select Committee on Benghazi.

Senator Sessions is in his fourth term, having first been elected in 1996. Prior to his election, he served as a United States Attorney for 12 years.

During his service as a U.S. Attorney, his 1986 nomination as a federal judge was derailed. Sessions later ran for Attorney General of Alabama serving two years before winning his seat in the U.S. Senate.

While best known for his tough positions on illegal immigration and border security, Sessions was the sponsor of the HEROES Act of 2005, which boosted the death gratuity benefit to $100,000, and upped Serviceman’s Group Life Insurance coverage to $400,000. The legislation became law later that year.

Sessions served on the Senate Committee on Armed Services, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, the Senate Committee on the Budget, and the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Sessions also served in the Army Reserve from 1973-1977, reaching the rank of captain.

Both Flynn and Sessions had been reportedly under consideration to serve as Secretary of Defense in a Trump administration. Had Flynn been nominated for that post, he would have needed a special exemption from rules mandating civilian leadership of the Pentagon.

Lists

6 planes the Air Force should bring back

We’ve talked about some planes that the United States Navy would probably want to have back in service. Well, the Air Force has a few planes they’d probably want back as well.


Let’s take a look at a few of them.

6. F-117 Nighthawk

The first operational stealth fighter was really more along the lines of a light bomber. They were retired in the mid-2000s as the F-22 Raptor came online. F-22 production, however, was stopped at 187 airframes by the Obama Administration. The Raptor has been called on to carry out attack missions in Syria and Afghanistan — F-117s could do those jobs instead.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
F-117s on a flight line in Saudi Arabia after returning from a strike mission during the Persian Gulf War (U.S. Air Force photo)

5. A-37 Dragonfly

It’s interesting to see programs, like OA-X, that are arguably trying to re-invent the wheel. The A-37 was a good counter-insurgency plane that carried a decent payload and was used as a forward air control plane. Equipped with some modern weapons, like the AGM-114 Hellfire, it’d do the job of a Light Air Support aircraft, and the RD costs will be lower.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
OA-37B Dragonfly, the FAC version of the A-37. (U.S. Air Force photo)

4. F-111 Aardvark/FB-111 Switchblade

The Air Force has a small bomber force: 76 B-52H Stratofortresses, 62 B-1B Lancers, and 20 B-2A Sprits. Having only 158 aircraft for a job can result in a force being spread very thin. Thankfully, there’s be an option for supplementing that force. The F-111 and FB-111 didn’t have the long range of these heavy bombers, but they can carry one heck of a payload — just the thing to deal with a horde of Russian tanks.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
General Dynamics F-111F at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

3. MH-53 Pave Low

The V-22 Osprey is a very nice aircraft and marked a huge leap in technology. That being said, the MH-53 Pave Low had its own advantages as well. The Air Force had 41 of these helicopters, and currently has 46 CV-22 Ospreys. The Osprey was introduced to replace the Pave Low, but maybe it would have been better to have as a complement. We know this technically isn’t a “plane,” but it’s hard to deny this fantastic airframe.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
A U.S. Air Force MH-53 Pave Low. Thomas J. Task flew a similar helicopter within 30 miles of Baghdad to rescue a downed pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo)

2. A-7D Corsair

This little-known Air Force variant of a Navy attack plane could also be used to free up existing long-range bombers. The A-7D can carry up to 15,000 pounds of bombs and a M61 cannon with over a thousand rounds of ammo.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
Three USAF A-7Ds in formation. Air Force Corsairs flew thousands of sorties with only four losses. (U.S. Air Force photo)

1. OV-10D Bronco

If you think the OA-X program brings about good planes, take a look at what the OV-10 Bronco can do. It can carry four machine guns and 3,600 pounds of ordnance. Plus, it had a top speed of 244 knots and a maximum range of 1,200 nautical miles, according to Boeing.

US soldiers are patrolling with these awesome pocket-sized spy drones
OV-10G+ operated by SEAL Team 6. (U.S. Navy photo)

Which planes from the Air Force’s past would you like to see make a comeback?

Do Not Sell My Personal Information