What Russia's deadliest nuclear sub could do to the US

Russia has two classes of nuclear submarines that could absolutely annihilate American military installations and cities if even a single one of the submarines attacked us at home. So, what would happen if these submarines attacked, and what keeps them from doing so?

In the inky black water, a predator slowly rises from the depths of the Gulf of Mexico like an Old God or Godzilla, but even more devastating and lethal: The Russian submarine Yuri Dolgoruky with 16 nuclear-tipped Bulava cruise missiles on board. When it begins ripple-firing its missiles, it could send 96 warheads into American cities and military installations.

It's a real submarine that's in service right now, and it could annihilate American cities in a surprise attack.

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A sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier stood watch for 23 hours during a hurricane

"A soldier never dies until he is forgotten; a Tomb Guard never forgets."

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier has been guarded for 24 hours a day, seven days a week, nonstop since July 2, 1937. The Tomb Sentinels that protect the site are the best of the best the U.S. Army has to offer and nothing short of Armageddon is going to break that discipline. By the time Hurricane Sandy hit the D.C. area in 2012, it was a "superstorm," expected to kill more people and cause more damage than any hurricane since Katrina in 2005.

That didn't faze Sgt. Shane Vincent one bit.

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Why the US military needs to seriously rethink 'recruiter goals'

Each year, the United States Armed Forces projects the amount of troops that will exit the service and how many new bodies it needs to fill the gaps in formation. This number is distributed accordingly between the branches and then broken down further for each recruiting station, depending on the location, size of the local population, and typical enlistment rates of each area.

This is, at a very basic level, how recruiter quotas work. If the country is at war, the need for more able-bodied recruits rises to meet the demand. When a war is winding down, as we're seeing today, you would reasonably expect there to be less pressure on recruiters to send Uncle Sam troops — but there's not. Not by a long shot.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Senior Airman Mya M. Crosby

These are the 'American Choppers' of the Air Force

With the eight 13 hour flights the aircraft of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing have on a daily basis, some parts of the aircraft can wear down, crack or break over periods of time.

The 380th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron fabrication flight, also known as "Fab Flight" or the "American Chopper" of aircraft maintenance at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, is in charge of identifying and repairing aircraft structural damage. They fix whatever can be broken, from a metal panel off the side of a KC-10 Extender to a tiny cracked screw the size of a fingernail.

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This is what troops do when they're wintered over in Antarctica

Winter sucks everywhere. Sure, the bugs have finally frozen over and you can finally break out that coat you like, but it's cold, you're always late because your car won't defrost in time, and no one seems to remember to tap their brakes when stopping at intersections.

But, as any optimist might tell you, things can always get worse! While it sucks for us up here in the middle of December, it's actually the nicest time to be in Antarctica — nice by Antarctic standards anyway.

It doesn't last, though, as the winters there begin in mid-February and don't let up until mid-November. And don't forget, we have brothers and sisters in the U.S. Armed Forces down there embracing the suck of the coldest temperatures on Earth.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Ryan Pickrell

Check out awesome National Guard photos on its 382nd birthday

The National Guard, a unique part of the American military, traces its origins to the birth of the first organized colonial militia regiments on December 13, 1636.

The Guard, which includes some of the oldest units in the US military, is a reserve component that can be called up on a moment's notice to respond to domestic emergencies or participate in overseas combat missions.

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3 ways to maintain OPSEC while deployed

The United States has numerous enemies abroad who are itching to steal state secrets or decipher troop movements. We live in an age where your phone, computer, or a friendly software update can betray you within seconds — without you knowing it. While the average serviceman may not be the target of a Russian honeypot, we are susceptible to human error.

Using these 3 tips, service members and their families can reduce the risk of OPSEC (Operational Security) violations. The consequences of violating OPSEC can range from being non-rec'd (not recommended for promotion) to court-martial under the Uniformed Code of Military Justice.

This list is by no means a way to inspire fear, but rather to orient you in the technical use of geotags, metadata, and VPNs.

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9 Hobbies that turns your MOS experience into money

Veterans that have made the transition into the civilian workforce can sometimes find themselves jaded by the repetitiveness of it all. Wake up, go to work, come home, go to bed, and repeat. There's not too much variety in the daily routine.

The good news is that the experiences and skills gained through military service can be used in finding a new hobby — one that'll break up the monotony. If you're looking to pick up something new — and make a little cash doing it — use this list to kickstart your brainstorming.

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Check out this awesome photo of a sniper and snake

A photo from Army ghillie suit testing shows a sniper maintaining his discipline even as a snake slithers across his barrel. It's awesome on its own, but it's also a great illustration of a lot of the stresses that snipers have to overcome to do their jobs.

It's no secret that being a sniper requires a lot of discipline and a high tolerance for discomfort, but one photo of a sniper taking this to an extreme level is making the rounds because the sniper maintained position so well that a snake slithered across his barrel.

Thankfully, an Army photographer was there to capture the moment.

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