Widgets Magazine

102-year-old WWII Navy WAVES vet would 'do it again'

When the Navy called on women to volunteer for shore service during World War II to free up men for duty at sea, 102-year-old Melva Dolan Simon was among the first to raise her hand and take the oath.

"I went in so sailors could board ships and go do what they were supposed to be doing," said Simon. She recalled her military service as "something different" in an era when women traditionally stayed home while men went off to war. "I helped sailors get on their way."

Simon was 25 years old in October 1942 and working as an office secretary at the former Hurst High School in Norvelt — a small Pennsylvania town named for Eleanor Roosevelt — when she joined the Navy's Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, or WAVES.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
2nd Lt. Kaylin Hankerson

Meet the first all-female aircrew of the Air Force's 'Combat King'

For some people, making history is not about what they're doing but instead why they're doing it.

On Sept. 6, 2019, six airmen from the 347th Rescue Group completed the HC-130J Combat King II's first flight to be operated by an all-female aircrew.

While most would be excited just to make history, this crew's "why" is less about the recognition but more about representation.

"We don't want to be noticed for being women," said Senior Airmen Rachel Bissonnette, 71st Rescue Squadron (RQS) loadmaster. "Any person who meets the bar can be an aircrew member. What we want is for the girls who think they can't do it, to know that they can."

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Sinéad Baker

US Navy confirms mysterious videos of pilots spotting UFOs are genuine

The US Navy has confirmed videos showing pilots confused by two mysterious flying objects over the US contained what it considers to be UFOs, after years of speculation since their release.

Joseph Gradisher, the Navy's spokesman for the deputy chief of naval operations for information warfare, confirmed that the Navy considered the objects in the videos to be unidentified.

"The Navy designates the objects contained in these videos as unidentified aerial phenomena," he said in a statement to The Black Vault, a civilian-run archive of government documents.

He also later gave the statement to the news outlet Vice.

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Why troops love the overpowered MICLIC

For starters, it's 1,750 pounds of C4 plastic explosive that can clear mines from over 9,000 square feet of ground in seconds. These bad boys can open the way through a North Korean minefield or an insurgent IED belt almost instantly, allowing infantry and other maneuver forces to bring the pain.

It's time to go take out the enemy position. Whether it's North Korean artillerymen raining rounds down on Seoul or an insurgency bomb factory, your most important targets can be protected by mines and IEDs that will slow down even the most determined force. But there's a tool made of 1,750 pounds of C4 that will get you through in a hurry: the MICLIC.

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Borne the Battle: Army veteran Nathan Goncalves

On this week's episode, Borne the Battle features guest Nathan Goncalves, who shares his story of struggle and perseverance.

While Goncalves didn't have the intrinsic calling to join the military, he enlisted at 23, seeking reform and discipline. It was in the Army that Goncalves sharpened his focus and developed lifelong friendships and mentors.

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Never miss the drop zone when the Unit Cartoonist is watching

(Feature cartoon: Delta's Marinus Pope is grilled for missing his intended touch down point by a significantly wide margin East by Northeast [E/NE]. His reconnaissance brothers approached me about roasting him for all eternity in the Unit Cartoon Book; an ask I joyfully accepted.)

My Special Mission Unit did a lot of parachute training, almost exclusively jumping from very high altitudes pulling out our parachutes at low altitudes, a technique called High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) drops. The technique leverages the high altitude to help cover the presence of the delivery airframe, and the low opening to keep the view of parachutes in the sky at a minimum.

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New study suggests Loch Ness Monster may actually be a giant eel

The first recorded sighting of the Loch Ness Monster dates all the way back to 565 A.D. when a writer named Adomnan recounted a tale about Saint Columba coming upon local residents burying a man near River Ness. According to the tale Adomnan recounted, the man had died as a result of being attacked by a "water beast" from the loch. Later, in the 1870s, the first modern sighting of the Loch Ness Monster was reported by a man named D. Mackenzie, though his report wouldn't see publication until decades later.

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'1917' is going to be the coolest World War I movie ever

After a century, World War I is finally getting the treatment in American cinema it so richly deserves. While some of the best war movies were World War I movies, Paths of Glory, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Lawrence of Arabia, there were also many misses. What's surprising is that there are relatively few WWI movies, when compared to those depicting other wars.

No longer. 1917 is a new movie based on the Great War, coming in December. And it looks like it could be the definitive WWI movie.

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'Midway' looks like it's everything 'Pearl Harbor' was supposed to be

Remember the collective crushing disappointment we all felt as we got settled in to watch Pearl Harbor in 2001, expecting a Saving Private Ryan-level war movie on a grander scale and suddenly realizing it was a love story and that the attack on Pearl Harbor was actually just part of the backstory? The bad news is that Pearl Harbor is still on television.

The good news is that the director of Independence Day just made a movie about the World War II Battle of Midway. And he even remade the attack on Pearl Harbor to get started.

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