Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE
Airman Brooke Moeder

How the Air Force's 'Dirt Boyz' keep bases working and jets soaring

Continuously working out in the sweltering Arizona heat, pouring concrete and maintaining the flight line, the airmen assigned to the 56th Civil Engineering Squadron here are nicknamed the "Dirt Boyz" — and for a good reason.

"We get dirty and run heavy equipment," said Tech. Sgt. John Scherstuhl, 56th CES horizontal construction section chief. "We have stockpiles of dirt and many dump trucks. We do a lot of ground work for building pads and sidewalks."

For Luke's mission of training the world's greatest fighter pilots and combat-ready airmen, the runways have to be clear for the jets to takeoff and land. "Dirt Boyz" assist in keeping the runways clear of foreign objects. They also continuously monitor for cracks in the runway's concrete, repairing any damage they discover in approximately three hours.

"Our main priority is the airfield," said Airman 1st Class Anibal Carrillo-Farias, 56th CES constructions and pavement heavy equipment craftsman. "We have to keep those jets in the air. Our mission to keep the runway in perfect condition so it doesn't hurt the jets in any way, shape or form."

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Army recruit gets first haircut in 15 years before shipping out to basic training

A 23-year-old California native received his first haircut in 15 years to enlist in the US Army.

US Army Pvt. Reynaldo Arroyo of Riverside donated 150 inches of hair to Locks of Love and enlisted in the Army as an infantryman on Aug. 15, 2019.

"I'm just really excited to be enlisting in the US Army," Arroyo said in a Facebook video. "Hopefully, some lucky little girl's going to get it."

Locks of Love is a non-profit organization that donates hair to disadvantaged people with long-term medical conditions resulting in hair loss, such as cancer and severe burns.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Richard Rice

After 45 years, Green Beret faces his past in Vietnam — part seven

Da Lat, Vietnam
April, 2017

My "one night in Da Lat" was a pleasant reprieve from the war and normal combat operations that we had been conducting. I'd heard of the city, but never believed all of the stories I'd heard. Stories about the beautiful architecture, the green and lush gardens, cool weather, and about the graceful people — certainly a Shangri-La such as this couldn't exist in the Vietnam I'd come to know. But low and behold, it did.

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Army celebrates anniversary of the 'first successful military jump'

As the national anthem played, the audience held hands over hearts and watched as a U.S. Army parachutist glided down from an unbroken blue sky, pulling a U.S. flag behind him.

So opened the Maneuver Center of Excellence and Fort Benning's National Airborne Day observation Aug. 16, 2019, at Fryar Drop Zone at Fort Benning. The first paratrooper test jump took place 79 years ago, Aug. 16, 1940, at Fort Benning.

The first test of a U.S. Army paratrooper drop occurred at Fort Benning Aug. 16, 1940, when Lt. (later Col.) William T. Ryder and Lt. (later Lt. Col.) James A. Bassett led the Airborne Test Platoon. The platoon jumped onto Lawson Field (later Lawson Army Airfield), completing the first successful military parachute jump.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Ryan Pickrell

How this Marine Corps sniper took one of the toughest shots of his life

US military snipers have to be able to make the hard shots, the seemingly impossible shots. They have to be able to push themselves and their weapons.

Staff Sgt. Hunter Bernius, a veteran Marine Corps scout sniper who runs an advanced urban sniper training course, walked INSIDER through his most technically difficult shot — he fired a bullet into a target roughly 2.3 kilometers (1.4 miles) away with a .50 caliber sniper rifle.

The longest confirmed kill shot was taken by a Canadian special forces sniper, who shot an ISIS militant dead at 3,540 meters, or 2.2 miles, in Iraq in 2017. The previous record was held by British sniper Craig Harrison, who shot and killed a Taliban insurgent from 2,475 meters away.

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How this operation is guarding the nation's skies

Following the events of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Department of Defense identified flaws in its security procedures within the airspace surrounding the National Capital Region. In response, Operation Noble Eagle was created to protect the skies of North America.

An important training element of Noble Eagle, Fertile Keynote exercises utilize the Air Force's civilian auxiliary, Civil Air Patrol.

With the combined support of the Air National Guard's 113th Wing at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, the CAP's Congressional Squadron, 1st Air Force and North American Aerospace Defense Command, Fertile Keynote missions simulate responses to unauthorized aircraft intruding into the restricted airspace surrounding the U.S. capital.

Other Fertile Keynote exercises take place every week across the country, with aerospace control alert fighter units and CAP squadrons participating.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Dave Mosher

NASA executive says a US-China Mars mission is not in the cards

NASA is pressing to return astronauts to the moon in just five years, then launch the first crew to Mars in the 2030s.

The latter journey may cost the US hundreds of billions of dollars. But an agency executive says the US has no plans to share the hefty cost — and the immortal glory — of such a feat with China, a nation that has similar ambition and resources to put people on the red planet.

"There is still a space race where we want our country to do it first," Jeff DeWit, NASA's chief financial officer, recently told "Business Insider Today," a top daily news show on Facebook, in July 201.

Right now, at the direction of the Trump administration, NASA is focusing on sending people back to the moon for the first time since 1972 . The agency's current goal is to land the Artemis mission, as it's known, in 2024.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Ryan Pickrell

How America's top snipers fire from helicopters with deadly accuracy

It can be hard to take a precision shot on the ground. It can be even harder to do in the air. Helo-borne snipers are elite sharpshooters who have what it takes to do both.

"There are a million things that go into being a sniper, and you have to be good at all of them," veteran US Army sniper First Sgt. Kevin Sipes previously told Business Insider. When you put a sniper in a helicopter, that list can get even longer.

"Shooting from an aircraft, it is very difficult," US Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Hunter Bernius, a native Texan who oversees an advanced sniper training program focused on urban warfare, told BI.

"Getting into the aircraft is a big culture shock because there are more things to consider," he added. "But, it's just one of those things, you get used to it and learn to love it."

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Chris Ward

Vehicle scams are targeting service members

According to a recent Better Business Bureau study, service members are more susceptible to fraud than average consumers. In fact, scammers using the name "Exchange Inc." have been attempting to fool soldiers and airmen into thinking they are working with the Army & Air Force Exchange Service to broker the sale of used cars, trucks, motorcycles, boats, and boat engines.

"For years, scammers have used the Exchange's trademarked logo and name without permission to purportedly sell vehicles in the United States," said Steve Boyd, the Exchange's loss prevention vice president. "Some military members have sent money thinking they're dealing with the Exchange, only to receive nothing in return."

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